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Can The Mystics Tell Us What Personal Identity Is? Is personal identity the soul? The body? A combination? Does it change or stay the same?...
Being Anti-Racist, Not Non-Racist Some people are content to be non-racist. But is that enough? What about the importance of directly opposing prejudices you observe in others?
Genetics, environment impact familial depression Building on a 30-year, three-generation study of depressed individuals, their children and offspring, a new study provides a better understanding of the familial risk for depression and the role neuroplasticity might have in increasing the risk of developing depression.
Emotion-processing networks disrupted in sufferers of depression Regions of the brain that normally work together to process emotion become decoupled in people who experience multiple episodes of depression, neuroscientists report. The findings may help identify which patients will benefit from longterm antidepressant treatment to prevent the recurrence of depressive episodes.
Like air traffic, information flows through neuron 'hubs' in the brain 70 percent of all information within cortical regions in the brain passes through only 20 percent of its regions' neurons, report researchers. The scientists report these high-traffic "hub neurons" could play a role in understanding brain health since this sort of highly efficient network -- in which a small number of neurons are more essential to brain function -- is also more vulnerable to disruption. That's because relatively small breakages can cause the whole system to "go down."
An Open Letter from a Wife in Recovery Please note, this letter is my own and unrelated to any Al-Anon approved literature. After reading An Open Letter From an Addict, I took the liberty of writing a letter back early on in my own recovery. Yes, my recovery. After finding out my husband … ...
Treatment Can Be Harder Than You Think It may be easy to look from the outside at people who don’t receive treatment for schizophrenia, bipolar, or any other mental illness, and criticize those people, but the realities … ...
No evidence of seasonal differences in depressive symptoms A large-scale survey of US adults provides no evidence that levels of depressive symptoms vary from season to season, according to new research. The findings are inconsistent with the notion of seasonal depression as a commonly occurring disorder.
The Psychology of David Bowie’s Major Tom One of David Bowie’s most popular and memorable hits is the song ‘Space Oddity.’ Released in 1969, just before the launch of Apollo 11 and the first moon walk, it might be particularly important in launching Bowie’s career; it was his first UK Top 5 hit. The … ...
It's mom who sees troubles for teens with food allergies Mothers of teens with food allergies are more likely than the kids themselves to report that the youth have emotional and behavioral problems, a new study concludes.
Integrating You into Private Practice : Interview with Renee... I had met Renee online and just had an instant resonance with what she would share. She was kind enough to offer to meet for this interview where we talk about what it means to be out of the box as a therapist, how to … ...
New knowledge on why patients with type 2 diabetes present smelling problems In a study in type 2 diabetic rats, researchers have identified alterations in specific nerve cells that are important for odor identification. The findings might explain why type 2 diabetic patients often experience smelling problems and potentially open up a new research field to develop preventive therapies against neurodegenerative diseases in type 2 diabetic patients.
Note to Self: Remember How to Be YOU Today Dear Self, Since there is no way you can be anyone else today, remember to consciously be yourself. Keep the following pointers in mind so that you can have the … ...
Self-Esteem In Children: Recognizing Self-Esteem As parents we want our children to be happy and grow up to be successful individuals.  Developing and nurturing a healthy self-esteem in children is key in raising successful individuals. … ...
How are all those screens changing kids' behavior? More research is needed to know how the frequency or quality of our technology use is changing basic human interactions and behaviors.
5 Ways to Get Your Partner to Change Everyone says you can’t change another person, nor should you try. You have to accept him or her, flaws and all. While it’s fundamentally true that you can’t make someone change — they have to want to change themselves — there are ways to influence … ...
Here’s How Your Height Affects Who Is Attracted To You AND Who You’re Attracted To It's more than just taller is better for men... » Continue reading: Here’s How Your Height Affects Who Is Attracted To You AND Who You’re Attracted To Related articles:People Choose Spouses With Similar DNA Friends Share More Similar DNA Than Strangers Kissing: Its Vital Role in Choosing and Keeping Partners How We Learn: Reading and Math Ability Driven By The Same Genes Fear of Math: How Much is Genetic?
Research on worms reveals how the brain compensates for sensory loss and points to its early evolutionary roots A new study has revealed that the brain’s compensatory mechanism (known as cross-modal plasticity) -- when some senses are enhanced following the loss of other sensory input -- is a basic feature that also exists in less complex nervous systems. The study has also exposed the way the mechanism works in the brain through an inter-sensory signaling system.
Soldiers with PTSD more 'tuned' to angry faces because of over-connected brain circuits Soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more 'tuned' to perceive threatening facial expressions than people without PTSD because of more over-connected brain circuits, according to a new study. The researchers say understanding how this works could help researchers develop better ways to assess when soldiers are ready to be redeployed.
Why your brain makes you slip up when anxious Neuroscientists have identified the brain network system that causes us to stumble and stall just when we least want to. Previous research has shown that people tend to exert more force when they know they are being watched. For example, pianists unconsciously press keys harder when they play in front of an audience compared to when playing alone. The new research explores why.