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Surprise role for dopamine in social interplay The chemical signal dopamine plays an unexpected role in social interactions, new research shows. In mice, nerve cells in the brain that release dopamine became particularly active in animals kept on their own for a short time.
For Valentines Day: An Open Letter to Your Heart Dear Hearts: To and from You – we are grateful It is You that give us the gratitude we feel . . . For the pull of love’s calling For … ...
Novel neuroprotective therapy found to enhance memory New research highlights the neuroprotective potential of a peptide developed at the university, and the marked difference in nerve cell communication in male and female mice. If researchers come to understand how the protein acts differently in each sex, drugs for potential therapeutics can be optimized to treat both autism and Alzheimer's disease.
Social animals seek out the company of others because their brains are wired to find it rewarding Social animals are strongly motivated to seek out the company of others, especially after periods of isolation, because their brains are wired to find it rewarding. A study now reveals a neural circuit that mediates social seeking behavior driven instead by a loneliness-like state. By shedding light on the neuroscience of isolation, the findings could help our understanding of social anxiety and autism spectrum disorders.
Why smiles (and frowns) are contagious Smile! It makes everyone in the room feel better because they, consciously or unconsciously, are smiling with you. Growing evidence shows that an instinct for facial mimicry allows us to empathize with and even experience other people's feelings. If we can't mirror another person's face, it limits our ability to read and properly react to their expressions.
Memory ensembles: To preserve its memories, the brain must regulate its neural networks For over forty years, neuro-scientists have been interested in the biological mechanisms underlying the storage of the information that our brain records every day. Today, a team of researchers demonstrates how the brain regulates the size of the neuronal ensembles that reflect the memory trace to optimize performance. By targeting neurons in the hippocampus, the scientists show that it is possible to inhibit -- or on the contrary to resurface -- a memory.
Will you be turning left or right for that Valentine’s Day kiss: It’ll depend on who you’re kissing! As Valentine's Day approaches, love is in the air. One sure-fire way to express love towards someone, be it a partner or even a child, is with a kiss. A recent study in Laterality demonstrates how the direction turned during a kiss differs depending on whether the kiss is shared between romantic partners or between a parent and child.
When “I Can’t” Thoughts Run Your Mind and Life Everyone experiences “I can’t” thoughts — as in: I can’t go back to school. I can’t get a promotion. I can’t be successful. I can’t get that job. I can’t ace that test. I can’t write a long research paper. I can’t run that race. … ...
Spark: New Motivation eBook From PsyBlog Out Next Week Stay tuned for an exclusive discount code, just for PsyBlog's readers.
How Your Unconscious Mind Is Keeping You Single Many people are consciously and happily single. But if you are interesting in finding a mate, consider these unconscious factors which may be affecting your status.
Treating The Mentally Ill In Prisons Yesterday morning I was reading the financial news on CNN, and I came across an article on mental illness. Although it is a tragic story, I thought, “Wow, if mental … ...
To Feel Better, Start Focusing Outward I’m feeling good today. And it’s not because of anything that’s happened to me. It’s because I’m excited about the future. Bernie and Trump won New Hampshire. By a landslide. … ...
Your Brain in Love What does neuroimaging tell us about romantic love?
This Is Why Some Couples Differ So Much In Their Physical Attractiveness Are couples who are mismatched in physical attractiveness just as happy?
Understanding Anger as a Secondary Emotion One of the basic realities of being in a situation with angry, hostile people is that it is easy to become angry and hostile in return. Besides fear and panic, … ...
The Surprising First Step in Effective Child Discipline Programs to help parents overcome child defiance don't usually start with star charts or time-outs but rather the surprisingly simple but tricky skill of paying attention.
Does Experiencing Therapy Make a Better Therapist? The therapeutic alliance between client and therapist is affected by therapist well-being.
Neuroscience: Dark things are conveyed faster than light things ”Did something move over there?“ Everyone has experienced this situation. One is looking towards a sound source, but with the best will in the world, one cannot detect an object. Only its sudden movement, even if minimal, allows its immediate perception. Scientists have investigated this phenomenon and show for the first time how simultaneous counterchange of luminance at the borders between object and background triggers activity waves in the visual brain. These waves may constitute a sensitive signal for motion detection.
In Love with a Narcissist? 3 Pitfalls of Insecurity Don’t get me wrong: Anyone can fall for a narcissist’s easy charm and seductive ways, and, alas, an absolutely terrific childhood probably won’t help you much in those first moments … ...
Embracing Your Emotions For many years during many times I was disconnected from my emotions. I might’ve been terrified inside, but I pretended that I was OK. I might’ve been angry with how … ...