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New analytical model for e-sports can predicts who will win — and why A new analytical model for e-sports developed by researchers in Sweden, Denmark and Germany, not only helps game developers better understand how players perform, but can also predict the outcome of the game. E-sports is the term used for the increasingly popular phenomenon of competitive computer and video gaming, where individuals or teams play against [...]
Study: Individual rewards can boost team performance at work Conventional wisdom has held that boosting team performance in the workplace should focus on rewarding entire teams that perform well – and that rewarding individuals increases competition rather than helping team performance. But new research published in the Journal of Applied Psychology finds that rewarding individual workers can boost performance both for other workers and for [...]
Antitrust laws may hinder socially-responsible business collaboration A new study suggests that U.S. antitrust laws could hamper the efforts of companies to collaborate on sustainable and socially-responsible business practices, even as consumers and businesses increasingly value them. Both the public and many businesses are worried about natural resource limitations and the threat of climate change. Current anti-trust laws don’t fit with today’s [...]
Practicing tai chi reduces risk of falling in older adults Recently, researchers compared the effects of tai chi to leg strengthening exercises (a physical therapy called “lower extremity training,” or LET) in reducing falls. Falls are a leading cause of serious injuries in older adults and can lead to hospitalization, nursing home admission, and even death. Arthritis, heart disease, muscle weakness, vision and balance problems, [...]
Rapid response for inflammation control in songbirds’ brains could lead to therapies in humans A biological process in the brains of zebra finches shows that the songbirds respond quickly to trauma and are capable of controlling the natural inflammation that occurs to protect the brain from injury. Understanding the process well enough could lead to therapies in humans to control inflammation and hasten recovery from brain injury such as [...]
4 Things I Learned in Trauma Group Therapy I never wanted to go to group therapy, especially for my trauma history. Child sexual abuse didn’t seem like something I was ready to share with a group of people, even if they had walked a mile in my shoes. As long as I didn’t … ...
Rewriting Stories that Spike Our Stress, Sink Our Mood... We are constantly spinning stories about ourselves. And many of these stories are negative to the bone. For instance, we might spin global stories like: No one will really love … ...
Making a List of Your Worries Can Help Things have been getting heavy recently, It seems like I’ve been bogging myself down in stress from my desire to move, from my inability to find more writing gigs and … ...
How teaching philosophy to children can improve their reading and math skills A programme to teach young children the basics of philosophical thinking in UK schools has been shown to help them progress in maths and reading. A new study evaluated the use of the Philosophy for Children (P4C) programme in which primary school children are guided through discussions of questions such as “Should a healthy heart [...]
Does Sexism Harm Women If It's Covert And Subtle? Research shows how subtle sexism in the workplace can harm women as much as the overt, blatant form.
Snake Venom Could Hold Key To Alzheimer’s Breakthrough The snake venom originally came from a pit viper, which is found in South and Central America. ** PsyBlog's new ebook is out now: "Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything (Ebook) **
Guest Blog: Biological Markers for Mental Illness By: Vincent M. Wales I am a person who lives with mental illness. I’m also a bit of a science geek. And I’m a writer, which means I’m also a … ...
Loneliness Has an Antidote and You’ll Never Guess What... I’m somebody who’s struggled with feelings of loneliness my whole life. It’s a big part of why I decided to become a relationship coach. I wanted to understand why some of my relationships felt more substantial than others. I wanted to understand why sometimes I … ...
Do You, or Your Partner, Have Relationship Blindness? Believing that your relationship is going well, and then having your relationship go well, may be two different things. It may benefit you to pay heed to these warning signs.
Today I Love The Frost on Roofs Today I love frost on roofs and cars. In winter there are few surfaces that will show frost here because they are all usually covered in snow, but here in … ...
Recurring ADHD Dreams Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. In the case of my ADHD, the equal and opposite reaction is anxiety. If you screw up enough times, you learn that … ...
Psychology Around the Net: March 12, 2016 Happy Saturday, sweet readers! I don’t know about your neck of the woods, but from where I’m sitting it’s a sunshine-filled, 70-degree day, and the last thing I want to do is be indoors! Still, I suggest you take your phone or tablet or laptop … ...
Advice from a Friend Going Through Chemo I must admit that when my friend shared she had cancer, it evoked vast amounts of fear mostly because my understanding was lacking in this area. But now with the advancement of many medications, surgical procedures, types of chemotherapy or radiation, various treatment options, and … ...
The depression gender gap Struggling with clinical depression can be especially challenging for men who don't have strong social support.
Stockholm Syndrome: Loving Our Abuser Reading old emails exchanged with my captors makes me sick. Nauseated. Loquacious lovey-dovey’s and toe-curling coo’s drip from our email conversations. The contrast between our communication back then is in … ...