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Neuronal feedback system could explain mechanism behind optical illusions Ever see something that isn’t really there? Could your mind be playing tricks on you? The “tricks” might be your brain reacting to feedback between neurons in different parts of the visual system, according to a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Sandra J. Kuhlman [...]
#WorldBipolarDay I AM #MoreThanADiagnosis Today is  #WorldBipolarDay  to bring world  awareness to bipolar disorder and to eliminate social stigma. International Bipolar Foundation campaign year theme wanted peers to think about expressing, in a creative way … ...
Parents’ binge eating, restrictive feeding practices may be reactions to kids’ emotions A new study of more than 440 parents and their preschoolers offers insight into why some parents who binge eat also may try to restrict their children’s food intake, placing their children at higher risk for unhealthy eating habits and weight problems. Parents who reported feeling distress when their child was angry, crying or fearful [...]
White teachers more likely to doubt educational prospects of black boys and girls When evaluating the same black student, white teachers expect significantly less academic success than black teachers, a new study concludes. This is especially true for black boys. When a black teacher and a white teacher evaluate the same black student, the white teacher is about 30 percent less likely to predict the student will complete [...]
Teens are gambling online at a significantly higher rate than previously reported Nearly 10 per cent of teens in three Canadian provinces said they had gambled online in the past three months, according to a new study by researchers from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and the University of Waterloo. It’s the first Canadian-based study to find such high levels of online gambling among [...]
Long-acting treatment for opioid addiction reduces risk of relapse In a multicenter, randomized clinical trial, ex-prisoners who received six monthly injections of naltrexone–a long-acting medication that blocks opioid receptors in the brain–were significantly less likely to resume opioid use than those who received counseling and referrals to community treatment centers without naltrexone. The study was published online today in New England Journal of Medicine. [...]
What’s Your Name? What’s your name? My name is Thomas Winterman, and I used to be a fat guy. Whew! It feels good to say that. No really, it’s nice to be able to call a spade a spade. I used to speak in code with words like … ...
Link between Zika virus and fetal brain damage confirmed Zika virus can be detected in blood samples taken from a pregnant woman while brain damage is developing, as well as isolated in cell culture from the brain tissue of the fetus.
Right brain may help predict recovery of language after stroke The brain is divided into two hemispheres, the right and the left. The left side is dominant in language and speech-motor functions in most people, so when it is damaged by stroke, it can lead to aphasia. Aphasia is difficulty speaking, naming, repeating, and understanding language. Looking at structures in the right side of the brain may help predict who will better recover from language problems after a stroke, according to a new study.
Nightmares After Trauma At least half of PTSD patients suffer from intense nightmares that replay a traumatic event. How do these differ from normal nightmares, and how can we treat them?
Towards a new theory of sleep Research shines new light on what goes on in the brain when we're not awake. Contrary to the generally accepted theory of why we sleep, the new work shows that homeostatic rebalancing doesn't occur during sleep; instead, it happens exclusively when animals are awake and active, leading to the question of what actually happens, then, when we are sleeping.
How Guilt and Shame Affects What We Eat After a week of following your new healthy eating plan religiously, you find yourself facing a day of endless chores: Housework, followed by errands, and capped off with a trip … ...
World Bipolar Day and What Bipolar Means To Me Hi. I am ElainaJ and I have bipolar 1 with psychosis. That means that sometimes I see or hear things that aren’t really there. I do not have schizoaffective disorder. … ...
6 Reasons the Myth of Maternal Bonding is Damaging... Not long ago, during a discussion on my Author Facebook about toxic mothers and how to deal with them, a reader posted, suggesting that “ the lack of the moment … ...
The Difference between Obstinate Teenagers vs. Budding Narcissists... It can be difficult to discern the difference between obstinate teenage behavior and a budding narcissist. After all, narcissism cannot be officially diagnosed until a person reaches the age of eighteen. However, the person needs to have demonstrated narcissistic behavior for a period of five … ...
Are Authentic People Less Likely to Conform? Rarely mentioned in the textbooks is the remarkable fact that 24 percent of Asch's participants did not conform.
Stress Is 50% More Likely to Cause Depression In One Gender, Study Finds Stress contributes to depression but it all depends on how you cope with it. ** PsyBlog's new ebook is out now: "Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything" **
My Secular Easter Sunday What does a religious holiday look like when you’re non-religious?
Social Anxiety: 5 Truths and How to Relieve the... “Perfectionism is a twenty-ton shield that we lug around thinking it will protect us, when in fact, it’s the thing that’s really preventing us from being seen and taking flight.” — Brené Brown About fifteen million adults suffer from social anxiety according to the Anxiety … ...
Mental Health Combined With STDs Create a Crisis For...     Herpes, HIV, gonorrhea and syphilis. One thought that doesn’t come to mind is how having a sexually transmitted disease might affect a person mentally and emotionally. The impact … ...