Article Description
People Experiencing Anxiety See The World Differently The research could help explain why some people are more prone to anxiety. ** PsyBlog's new ebook is out now: "Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything" **
Unblocking Your Spiritual Inner Child The yearning soul-child inside you, the one who has a sense-memory of her connection to the Creator—this soul-child is your spiritual inner child. Your deepest, hidden inner child, the one … ...
The Hokey Pokey Way of Life Remember the timeless classic song called The Hokey Pokey? Performed in 1953 by Ray Anthony and Jo Ann Greer, it remains a favorite of children of all ages; including this 57 … ...
Study looks at why people may feel more helpless in stressful situations than others Some people are able to cope with stress much better than others. Some individuals are resilient, while others succumb to despair. The reason, scientists have discovered, is all in the brain.
5 Surprising Signs & Hidden Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder... We tend not to think of people with bipolar disorder as having any “hidden symptoms.” It may seem that individuals with bipolar are either engaged in their treatment — and therefore experience few extreme mood swings — or they are not. If not, they may seem very … ...
How I Know You Have What it Takes To... The first three decades of my life were a pretty rough ride. I just didn’t think I had what it takes to do a good job living life as “me.” … ...
Mild TBI linked to eye movement impairment Mild traumatic brain injuries (TBI) could be linked to eye movement impairment, even beyond the acute stage of injury, according to researchers. These findings indicate a potentially more effective way to identify long-term chronic effects on those with mild TBI.
Supporting Transgender Children Well beyond conversion therapy and news headlines, there remains real questions about how best to respond to gender nonconforming kids
3 Ways to Simplify Life With ADHD Life with ADHD can be chaotic and overwhelming. Being disorganized and having trouble planning ahead can result in things that shouldn’t be a problem spiraling out of control. One way … ...
Today I Love That Hazy Sun Today I love that hazy sun behind those blurry clouds that look like they are going nowhere and doing so really fast. I love that the crazy old sun is … ...
Lesser-Known Schizophrenia Symptoms Which Actually Have a Great Impact... When people think of schizophrenia, they often think of hallucinations and delusions. And these are debilitating for many people with the illness. Imagine that you can’t trust your own mind to tell you what’s real and what isn’t. One of Devon MacDermott’s clients asked her … ...
Experience My ADHD So you want to know what ADHD is like? I’ll tell you what it’s like. It’s like … but wait. Why should I tell you? If you want to know, … ...
Senior Dating: A Healthy Choice Dating is not just for the young, but for the young at heart.  From speed dating events to online dating forums, senior dating sites are emerging and folks of all ages are seeking companionship. As humans, we are wired for connection. Healthy partnering promotes healthy … ...
“Just Right” OCD If you or a loved one has obsessive-compulsive disorder, you know that OCD typically attacks what matters the most to you – your values. Is a loving relationship the most … ...
Why Psychiatry Should Discard The Idea of Free Will If psychiatry is a medicine of the mind, but our common ideas of the mind are wrong, where does that leave the medicine?
What Preschools Can Teach Universities Almost as soon as they begin school, children start getting tested. With the introduction of tests for four-year-olds and the explicit link between test results and school performance in the UK, education policies of successive governments have led to an increased emphasis on results at all levels of schooling. This focus has led to a stigmatization of failure, even though it is fundamental to the learning process from preschool all the way to university. This ill-prepares learners for real life, which does not provide set answers to problems with neat scores to gauge progress. The real world is messy and diverse, and young people need to be creative, resourceful, and resilient to succeed in it. One of the best ways to achieve this is through play. The best kind of learning is “intrinsically motivated,” where students want to learn because it is interesting, purposeful and personally relevant, not because it is assessed. Learning takes place through action, failure, reflection, and practice. But while making mistakes is an inevitable part of this process, our school system fails to recognize this. Exam grades are often seen as more important than fostering a love of learning—and as a result schools are overlooking the value of learning that does not fit into a specified curriculum. When students reach university, most have learned that grades (and their impact on job opportunities) are of prime importance. For many, the magic of learning out of interest and passion has been eclipsed. The introduction of tuition fees in the UK has only increased the expectation that the role of university is to provide qualifications rather than focus on the intrinsic value of education. This shift in expectation is hardly surprising given that students have to consider their personal investments and the returns they are likely to receive. This makes perfect sense for an individual student, but does not take into account what is best for society, which needs people to be creative and take risks, not simply focus on scoring highly on a test. The need to fail While many students fail university modules and drop out of courses, this is often seen as a last resort and universities are becoming increasingly averse to failing their students. A focus on one-shot assessments does not give students opportunities to fail regularly on a less catastrophic level. The ability to manage failure, both emotionally and practically, increases the ability to manage risk. It is only by taking risks that we can explore new possibilities and ways of thinking. We are in danger of creating a generation of risk-averse students. The possibility of failure can also actually increase a person’s intrinsic motivation: If success is certain, there is little challenge and so little motivation. One way to develop a generation who can take risks is through playful learning. Play supports socialisation and decreases stress, develops imagination and creativity, and enables learners to have new experiences and learn from their mistakes. While it is integral to early years education, a focus on assessment has all but driven play out of schools. The relative flexibility of higher education curricula and teaching approaches provide opportunities to give learners chances to play, experiment, experience, and fail—and, most importantly, learn from those failures. Playtime at university Several UK universities are already embracing elements of playful learning. For example, the University of Portsmouth uses “pervasive learning” activities, where courses are taught through playful, detailed simulations in which students work together to solve problems and make mistakes away from the real consequences of assessment. The Great History Conundrum at the University of Leicester, which runs every year for first-year students, uses an online puzzle-solving card game to teach critical historical literacy. Students play as long as they like to collect enough points to pass the course: If they fail on one puzzle they can move on to the next. Students at Manchester Metropolitan University play the Staying the Course game during orientation to highlight the range of university support available. The University of Brighton has also used alternate reality games during orientation, which allow students to work together to solve online and physical puzzles, and large-scale multi-player quizzes to engage new students and introduce them to university life in novel ways. These kind of approaches do not work in every context, and will inevitably meet resistance from some students and academics. We have to make the case that far from trivializing education, playful learning makes it richer, more purposeful, and more useful for life after education. Playful learning is not an easy option. It is more academically challenging, making students less reliant on rote learning and established ideas. To embrace playful learning, we need to create more opportunities for students to fail safely and focus on the development of intrinsic motivation, passion, and curiosity. Crucially, we must radically rethink how, and why, we assess our students. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.
10 Things You Should Not Do With A Delusional Person Do you know what a delusion is? If I were to ask you to define it would you be able to? If not, that’s okay. Many people struggle with the … ...
What Do 25% Men Do Wrong Before They Get Married? Twenty-five percent  of men get it wrong. Maybe they are just too progressive, or maybe it is too beneath them.  Maybe it’s fear, or maybe they have a legitimate reason. Hey, … ...
How To Be A Great Pal to Your Borderline Friend Having a friend with a mental illness like borderline personality disorder takes a bit more time. You'll want to learn about the disorder and be aware of the common pitfalls.
Brain imaging study examines how LSD changes the way people think about time Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) use causes changes in the way that people think about time that may help develop drug therapies for people suffering from depression, according to a study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. LSD is a synthetic hallucinogenic drug, which has long been used recreationally. Changes in the perception of time is a [...]