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Mind Games What does your morning shower feel like? “Come again, Matt?” Yes, what does your morning shower feel like? “Why? Before work, I typically hop in and hop out. Can’t be late for boss — he’s a real jerk. I rinse off in 10 minutes. Why? … ...
This Creative Pursuit Lowers Cortisol And Relieves Stress Study could explain why colouring books are becoming so popular. > Use code "10OFF" for 10% off PsyBlog's latest ebook: "Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything" **
Natural molecule could improve Parkinson's A natural molecule shows benefit in a preliminary clinical trial for Parkinson’s Disease, report scientists. Current treatments for Parkinson's disease are generally limited to temporarily replacing dopamine in the brain as well as some medications designed to slow the progression of the disease process.
Impaired decision-making may contribute to motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease People with Parkinson's disease have a form of impaired decision-making that may be a major contributor to the movement problems that characterize the disease. This finding suggests that the neurological factors underlying Parkinson's, which currently affects nearly 1 million people in the United States, may be more complex than commonly believed.
Cerebral microbleeds in MS are associated with increased risk for disability Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study.
Genetic mutation causes ataxia in humans, dogs Cerebellar ataxia is a condition of the cerebellum that causes an inability to coordinate muscle movements. A new study describes a new genetic mutation as an additional cause of ataxia in humans and mice. The mutation, in the gene CAPN1, affects the function of the enzyme calpain-1 and causes abnormal brain development. The same genetic mutation is also associated with ataxia in Parson Russell terrier dogs.
Stinky or fragrant? Predicting changing odor preferences Pleasant and unpleasant odors are a part of everyone's life, but how do our reactions to smells change when other odors are present? To answer this question, researchers have combined experimental and modeling approaches to reveal the process through which smell preference is computed in the brain.
A single species of gut bacteria can reverse autism-related social behavior in mice The absence of a one specific species of gut bacteria causes social deficits in mice, researchers report. By adding this bacteria species back to the guts of affected mice, the researchers were able to reverse some of their behavioral deficits, which are reminiscent of symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in humans. The investigators are now looking to explore the effects of probiotics on neurodevelopmental disorders in future work.
When the elevator door opened… I knew it was going to happen at some point. And I knew I wouldn’t know how I would feel. But, I also knew I had a plan on what … ...
A New Part Of The Happiness Equation Discovered Equation that can predict your happiness has a new term. > Use code "10OFF" for 10% off PsyBlog's latest ebook: "Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything" **
Making Art Can De-Stress You—Even if You Suck at It Making art may lower our stress hormone levels, a new study finds—no matter what skills we bring to the table.
Can You "Catch" Depression? Can exposure to depression cause you to become depressed? Dr. Hendriksen's answer might surprise you.
Are You Sure You Want to Read This? An uncertain world requires simple decision-making processes.
Book Review: I Have A Voice Reading I Have a Voice will inspire you to show up fully, be seen, and live your life to the fullest.   I recently listened to the audio version of Tyler … ...
How older people learn As a person ages, perception declines, accompanied by augmented brain activity. Learning and training may ameliorate age-related degradation of perception, but age-related brain changes cannot be undone. Rather, brain activity is enhanced even further, but for other reasons and with different outcomes.
5 Reasons You May Be Underachieving Nothing is more depressing than feeling like you have worked hard and your efforts have gone to waste. Or that you started out in life with great hopes for success … ...
The Commitment Conundrum: What It Takes to Create Lasting... If there’s a single word that stirs up deep emotions, it’s “commitment.” While some desperately seek it, others run the other way. What is it about commitment that is so appealing to some, while striking fear into the hearts of others? Can we revision commitment … ...
Today I Love Lazy Mornings Today I love lazy mornings that linger and wait for me to open my eyes and find my way into consciousness. I love thunderstorms and there is supposed to be … ...
What Are Your Happiness Strengths and Weaknesses? Happiness is something nearly everyone wants more of. Perhaps we don’t feel it often enough or strongly enough, or it seems to slip through our fingers far too easily. Many happiness seekers have read dozens of articles, yet they don’t feel much closer to creating the happiness they desire in their lives. If this sounds like you, don’t worry. Reading about the practices that increase happiness is a great first step. But the key that you may not have heard yet is this: To increase your happiness, you need a strategic plan for action. Making a plan for optimizing happiness is more important than most people realize. But think about it: Would you bake a cake without a recipe? Would you fix your transmission without the car manual? Would you go on a journey into the wilderness without a map? We know, intuitively, that a plan or guide or map—some kind of tool—makes it much easier to effectively navigate new territory. If long-term happiness is new territory for you, then you need some kind of plan that maps out a strategy for reaching your happiness goals. How to make an effective happiness plan The best way to make progress toward a happier life is by being strategic and focusing on the skills that you need to learn. As an example, consider math skills. Say you are great at addition but not so good at multiplication. It’s unlikely that practicing addition will make you better at multiplication. To get better at multiplication, you need to practice multiplication. And your math skills, as a whole, will not get much better until you practice multiplication. The same logic holds for happiness. It turns out that happiness is not something we find, or reach, or become—we learn happiness skills, just as we would learn any other skill. Most likely you are already really good at some happiness skills and not so good at others. For example, you might already be great at gratitude, but not so good at empathy. By practicing gratitude, you are not likely to become more empathic. So your happiness skills, as a whole, will improve more if you spend your time practicing empathy, one of your weaknesses. Some of the most effective mental health interventions rely on this well-supported and commonsensical idea that if we are poor at a particular cognitive, behavioral, or emotional skill, then we need to improve this skill to boost our mental health. For some reason, the field of positive psychology rarely makes use of this important insight. But it has been shown that turning your happiness weaknesses into strengths means you will have more skills and, as a result, greater happiness. The field of learning science shows that personalized learning approaches far outperform one-size-fits-all approaches. A personalized approach can help you learn skills that you’re weak at, skills you’re excited about, and skills that build on each other in important ways. Personalized approaches result in faster, more fun, and more effective learning because they focus on your unique needs, interests, and abilities. How do you figure out your happiness strengths and weaknesses? Consider how well you demonstrate the following skills in your daily life: Positive thoughts about the self Acceptance: The ability to accept yourself and your emotions non-judgmentally. Positive self-views: The ability to see yourself as a good, worthwhile human being. Clarity: The ability to understand what you value, how you feel, and who you are. Positive reappraisal: The ability to change your thoughts in ways that help you experience longer-lasting, more intense, or more frequent positive emotion.
 Positive thoughts about othersRejection tolerance: The ability to perceive the actions of others as inclusive rather than rejecting. Empathy: The ability to put yourself in another person’s shoes and see the world from their perspective. Gratitude: The ability to be thankful for the experiences and people you have in your life. Letting go: The ability to stop fretting and ruminating about negative interpersonal situations.
 Positive behaviors involving the selfPlanning: The ability to develop effective strategies and take actions that progress you towards your goals. Growth mindset: The belief that your strengths can be developed through hard work and dedication. Self-care: The ability to resist engaging in unhealthy behaviors (drugs, alcohol, shopping, or overeating) as a means to increase happiness. Prioritizing positivity: The ability to make time for, and consistently schedule, activities that you enjoy. Positive behaviors involving others Kindness: The ability to be friendly, generous, and considerate of others. Autonomy: The ability to resist the influence of others, make your own independent decisions, and take action based on your unique values. Expressivity: The ability to easily communicate and share intimate aspects of yourself with others. Assertiveness: The ability to stand up for yourself, speak up, and communicate your needs. Once you know your happiness strengths and weaknesses, choose just one skill that you believe is a weakness for you. It may be obvious to you right away. If it’s not, think about whether you tend to have more difficulty with thoughts versus behaviors, or self- vs. other-related skills. Or, if you tend to be poor at all the skills focusing on positive thoughts about the self, start by focusing on one of those. It’s important not to try to develop too many skills at once. If you focus on too many things, you’ll have a difficult time making progress on any of them. But if you feel up to it, you can choose one more skill that you think you would really enjoy practicing. Maybe you have been meaning to prioritize positive activities, and you would really love to spend more time doing fun things. Once you have decided which skills to work on, think about how and when you will practice. Plan to practice building these skills at least a little bit every week for a few months—and see if you get a happiness boost.

Toxic Mom? Going No Contact? 5 Things You Must Realize In cultural mythology—the bedrock of which is that all women are instinctively maternal and that all mothers are loving—the daughter who goes no contact and cuts her mother out of … ...