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Is Your Worry Normal or a Sign of an Anxiety Disorder? You worry about passing your exam and surviving your presentation. You worry about making a mistake at work. You worry about not having enough money to pay this month’s bills. You worry about the email you just sent, which misspelled your new coworker’s name. Ughhh. … ...
More brain activity is not always better when it comes to memory, attention Potential new ways of understanding the cause of cognitive impairments, such as problems with memory and attention, in brain disorders including schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s are under the spotlight in a new research review.
What Are My Brain Tumors Trying to Tell Me? What if illnesses mark the places in your being where parts of you got lost?
Pre-clinical study suggests Parkinson's could start in gut endocrine cells A potential new mechanism has been identified in both mice and human endocrine cells that populate the small intestines. Inside these cells is a protein called alpha-synuclein, which is known to go awry and lead to damaging clumps in the brains of Parkinson's patients, as well as those with Alzheimer's disease.
What the pupils tells us about language The meaning of a word is enough to trigger a reaction in our pupil: when we read or hear a word with a meaning associated with luminosity (“sun,” “shine,” etc.), our pupils contract as they would if they were actually exposed to greater luminosity. And the opposite occurs with a word associated with darkness (“night,” “gloom,” etc.). These results open up a new avenue for better understanding how our brain processes language.
All in the eyes: What the pupils tells us about language The meaning of a word is enough to trigger a reaction in our pupil: when we read or hear a word with a meaning associated with luminosity ("sun," "shine," etc.), our pupils contract as they would if they were actually exposed to greater luminosity. And the opposite occurs with a word associated with darkness ("night," "gloom," etc.). These results open up a new avenue for better understanding how our brain processes language.
Podcast: What Is Persistent Depressive Order Like? In this episode of the Psych Central Show, host Gabe Howard interviews his co-host, Vincent M. Wales, about living with persistent depressive disorder (formerly known as dysthymia).  Vincent speaks candidly about how he came to realize that he had chronic depression, the mistakes he made in … ...
Wired for Survival Can we increase the odds of surviving violent events by understanding and harnessing our body's natural stress response?
APA Refocuses Pilot Program Aimed At Curtailing Unauthorized Publication Of Journal Articles Individual authors not program’s target, APA says
How Maternal Personality Problems Affect Children How does parental personality dysfuction affect the future mental health of offspring? New research sheds light on an age-old question.
More amyloid in the brain, more cognitive decline The amount of amyloid plaques in a person's brain predicts the rate at which his or her cognition will decline in the next four years, outlines new research.
Drinking during adolescence can alter brain cell nerve growth The developmental period from adolescence to adulthood is accompanied by a greater vulnerability to addictions than is seen in other periods of life. A new report describes a study in mice of the neurobehavioral impact of chronic, intermittent alcohol-vapor exposure during adolescence, in an effort to model periodic heavy drinking and compare it with similar drinking behavior during adulthood.
Even Therapists Get the Blues “Have patience with all things, but chiefly have patience with yourself. Do not lose courage in considering your own imperfections but instantly set about remedying them — every day begin the task anew.” -Saint Francis de Sales My first depressive episode came at the age … ...
Very Popular Drink Linked To Brain Damage The drink was linked to shrinkage in the hippocampus, an area critical for memory and other mental functions. • Try one of PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (NEW) The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything
Surprising new link between inflammation and mental illness Up to 75 percent of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus -- an incurable autoimmune disease commonly known as lupus -- experience neuropsychiatric symptoms. But so far, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying lupus' effects on the brain has remained murky.
How brain circuits govern hunger and cravings By developing a new approach to imaging and manipulating particular groups of neurons in the mouse brain, scientists have identified a pathway by which neurons that drive hunger influence distant neurons involved in the decision of whether or not to react to food-related cues. Their findings could open the door to targeted therapies that dampen food cue-evoked cravings in people with obesity.
Dressmakers found to have needle-sharp 3-D vision Haute couture can be credited for enhancing more than catwalks and red carpets. New research suggests that the 3D or 'stereoscopic' vision of dressmakers is as sharp as their needles.
The Upside of Chance Many people fear chance because to them it means unpredictability, uncertainty, and loss of control. These horrors may be overstated. Chance can contribute to creativity and fun.
Atheist in Appalachia What's it like being secular in the Bible Belt?
Why Men Give Up Their Identity in a Relationship Over the past 30 years of working as a psychologist with men doing individual and group therapy, I have often seen men struggling to maintain either the romance or friendship or both in their intimate relationships. It’s a subject I’ve been investigating and exploring for … ...