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Why teens take risks: It's not a deficit in brain development A popular theory in neuroscience proposes that slow development of the prefrontal cortex explains teenagers' seemingly impulsive and risky behavior. But an extensive literature review finds that much of the evidence for that theory misinterprets adolescent exploratory behavior as impulsive and that much of what appears to be impulsivity is behavior that is often guided by the desire to learn about the world.
An Inspiring Way to Practice Self-Care For Rachel Wilkerson Miller, being organized is a significant way she practices self-care. Because not having your life together—forgetting to do important tasks, losing important information—is undoubtedly stressful, she writes … ...
Want Happy and Healthy Kids? Just Say “NO!” When asked what they want for their kids, many parents respond, “I just want them to be happy and healthy.” Such a simple, harmless, laudable goal! And yet, such an orientation frequently results in parents giving their kids too much stuff, too many experiences, at too early an age. … ...
How to Change Passive Aggressive Behavior Is a passive aggressive person causing you to feel angry and exhausted? The skill of Benign Confrontation can help you make long-term changes to this destructive dynamic.
Could olfactory loss point to Alzheimer's disease? Simple odor identification tests may help track the progression of Alzheimer's disease before symptoms actually appear, particularly among those at risk.
Cause and Cure of Eating Disorders? How the language of Eating Disorders has changed. Understanding causation and recovery has shifted. Options and Opportunities for greater understanding
Helping Someone Who’s Threatening Suicide Saturday I woke up to a text that no friend or loved one ever wants to wake up: “_____ tried to kill herself last night. She’s in the hospital.” I … ...
A Moral Compass for Troubling Times We need a clear moral compass during these complicated times.
#258: Health Care’s Gender Bias I cannot write fast enough to keep up with the restrictions that are being applied to women’s health care in the US. Marilyn Metzl writes: (2017. A Womb of Her … ...
Navigation and spatial memory: New brain region identified to be involved Navigation in mammals including humans and rodents depends on specialized neural networks that encode the animal’s location and trajectory in the environment, serving essentially as a GPS, findings that led to the 2014 Nobel Prize in Medicine. Failure of these networks to function properly, as seen in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological conditions, results in severe disorientation and memory deficits. Researchers have now uncovered striking neural activity patterns in a brain area called the retrosplenial cortex that may assist with spatial memory and navigation.
Genograms: What They Are & How to Do Them If you were fortunate enough to be given instruction in the use of genograms during your graduate training, you can skip this article. If, like some of my early career supervisees, you were not taught this valuable tool, then I do urge you to learn … ...
Today I Love Living On The Edge Today I love living on the edge. I love that I am in my satellite office and forgot my power cord so I only have the half charge on my … ...
OCD and Sleep Timing I’ve been writing about obsessive-compulsive disorder for about ten years now, and my most-read posts, by far, are those that discuss sleep and sleep deprivation. OCD, by its very nature, is unconducive to a good night’s sleep. How can you sleep when you have to … ...
7 Signs of Racial “Group Think” and Group Polarization... How did you feel this past weekend (Friday to Sunday) about the events taking place in Charlottesville Virginia? Did you watch the events? Did you follow the events online? Although it … ...
Have Divorced and Single People Switched Places in How... I am old enough to remember a time when people would speak in hushed voices about people who were divorced. They’d say, in disapproving tones, “She’s a divorcee.” It’s different … ...
Narcissism and Psychopathy in the Game of Thrones (Part... “Chaos is a ladder.” Petyr “Littlefinger” Baelish One of the more perplexing and complicated characters in George R. R. Martin’s Game of Thrones (2015)  is Petyr “Littlefinger” Baelish. Littlefinger is … ...
Baby Jealousy Jealous. So jealous I could taste it. Jealousy gripped me by the throat, making me wish I could vomit to rid myself of the horrible feeling. Worse still was the … ...
Are Feelings Good or Bad? Many people label feelings (fear, anger, sadness) as bad or negative states and others (joy, excitement) as good or positive. However feelings are neither good nor bad, feelings just are. … ...
Teens’ psychopathology is reflected in their virtual videogame behaviors, study finds Psychopathology is linked to different in-game playing patterns among teen boys, according to new research published in PLOS One. “I’m interested in this topic, one might say, as a sublimation of my own ‘gamophilic’ nature,” remarked study author Aviv Segev of Tel Aviv University. “I got my first PC when I was only 6 (then [...]
Study finds some types of narcissists are more prone to forgiveness than others Though narcissistic people are usually assumed to hold grudges, new research suggests that not all narcissists are unforgiving. The study, published in the Journal of Research in Personality, broke narcissism down into three subtypes: antagonistic, agentic and communal. Antagonistic narcissism describes the tendency to strive for supremacy and derogate others, while agentic narcissism refers to [...]