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Study examines risk, risk factors for depression after stroke During the first three months after stroke, the risk for depression was eight times higher than in a reference population of people without stroke, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. More than 10 million people had a stroke in 2013 and more than 30 million people worldwide live with a stroke diagnosis. Merete [...]
Americans more politically polarized than ever — independents at an all time high Results of a study using nationally representative surveys of 10 million U.S. residents from 1970 to 2015 by researchers from Florida Atlantic University and San Diego State University show that Americans are not only more politically polarized than ever but that more people are identifying as independent. In 1989, about 30 percent of adults identified [...]
Model maps out molecular roots of learning and memory formation A team of researchers has built a mathematical model that describes the molecular events associated with the beginning stage of learning and memory formation in the human brain. The research, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, paves the way for understanding cognitive function and neurodegenerative diseases — at the molecular [...]
Is sufficient sleep the key to successful antidepressant response? Medication is an important part of treatment for many patients with major depressive disorder, but the transition to antidepressants isn’t always smooth. It can take six weeks for a person to respond to pharmacotherapy. And with remission rates at about only one-third, the majority of patients with depression could also benefit from better overall response [...]
Fighting Boredom? Read This   While we may complain about having too much stress, we often fail to consider that the flipside is something universal to us all: boredom. And too much boredom — or … ...
Through the One-Inch Picture Frame I am in the middle of listening to the book Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott. So far, I can say it is the most inspirational book on creativity I’ve come across in my life. This post is not … ...
7 Signs Private Practice is Not For You: Part I Many therapists have fantasies of going into private practice – and, this is no surprise given all the hype around the benefits of building your own private practice. Hype that I contribute to, no doubt! The promises are endless: You’ll have unlimited freedom and flexibility. … ...
What Happens When Republicans and Democrats Get Married? Are partisan political views reflected in who marries whom?
Set These Routines And Start The School Year Right I don’t know about you, but I feel ready to get back into the comforting structure of the school-year schedule. Routines makes life easier and less stressful in so many … ...
Can People Really Change? Short answer: Yes. The question really is if people want to change enough to make it happen. I’m going to take a different approach with this post. I actually wasn’t sure how … ...
Campuses cautiously train freshmen against subtle insults Many orientation programs now cover "microaggressions" in addition to addressing issues of diversity and sexual consent.
The Benefits of Abilify More than half of people with bipolar disorder take second-generation/atypical antipsychotics on a regular basis to control mood. While effective, there is always a risk of adverse side effects. The … ...
Don’t tell anxious kids that everything will be o.k. Today’s kids are more worried than any kids in recent history.
10 Things I Wish I Knew Before College My parents, teachers and mentors always told me that college would change me. “Josh, get the most out of it. It will be the best time in your life. You’re going to miss it when you’re done.” These statements never really resonated with me. My … ...
The 8-Ball from Hell of ASD: Perfectionism Perfectionism is a dilemma with two prongs: the self-imposed need to get things exactly right, and self-inflicted criticism in the face of inevitable failure.
Effortless studying? Creating long-lasting memories while having fun Imagine if playing a new video game or riding a rollercoaster could help you prepare for an exam or remember other critical information. A new study in mice shows this link may be possible.
Antidepressant bone loss could be prevented with beta-blockers The antidepressant fluoxetine causes bone loss by instructing the brain to send out signals that increase bone breakdown, but a beta-blocker can intercept the signals, a new study in mice has found.
Can Someone Without Depression Understand It? I spend a lot of time struggling with how to describe what depression feels like. Partly because I’m a writer and partly because I want my loved ones to understand … ...
Genes Explain Much of the Overlap of ADHD With... People with ADHD often have comorbid conditions like substance abuse, alcoholism and binge eating. According to some new research from a doctoral candidate at Linköping University in Sweden, a lot of the blame for this unholy alliance between ADHD and other conditions seems to lie in the genes. A few...
Brain peptide research may lead to promising new treatments for mental illnesses Recent research points to the importance of a molecule called relaxin-3 in the brain, with effects on various processes and behaviors such as mood, stress, and cognition. Because these are often aberrant in mental illnesses, investigators are studying the potential of relaxin-3-based interventions to treat depression, anxiety, and other conditions.