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Different brain atrophy patterns may explain variability in Alzheimers disease symptoms Mathematical modeling of the brain scans of patients with Alzheimer's disease and others at risk for the devastating neurodegenerative disorder has identified specific patterns of brain atrophy that appear to be related to the loss of particular cognitive abilities.
Do you really need eight glasses a day? For the first time, the mechanism that regulates fluid intake in the human body and stops us from over-drinking has been revealed by researchers. Over-drinking can cause potentially fatal water intoxication. The study challenges the popular idea that we should drink eight glasses of water a day for health.
Martha’s Story: TMS Offers an Alternative to Medication &... I haven’t read many paragraphs that articulate depression as accurately as this one, in Martha Rhodes’s riveting memoir, 3000 Pulses Later: At that moment, my pain felt equal to — if not even more than — what I imagined any physical illness could pose. The … ...
The Progress Addict (and why this doesn’t work) I’ve blogged some in the past about how, sometimes, just every so often, I get this tantalizing glimpse of another me. She is buried (stuck? hiding?) deep inside me. And … ...
Don’t do This on a First Date Today first dates seem to be more prevalent than ever. It’s easy to meet people online, where there are seemingly hundreds of matching services, and it’s possible to have first … ...
High School Background Might Have More to Do With... A growing theme in education research is that having the right personality traits is as important as intelligence in academic success. Smarts help, but they aren’t necessarily enough if you want an A. Rather, traits like conscientiousness that have to do with working hard and wanting to do a good...
Not really a matter of choice? Choices, it is commonly understood, lead to action – but how does this happen in the brain? Intuitively, we first make a choice between the options. For example, when approaching a yellow traffic light, we need to decide either to hit the breaks or to accelerate the car. Next, the appropriate motor response is selected and carried out, in this case moving the foot to the left or to the right. Traditionally, it is assumed that separate brain regions are responsible for these stages. Now researchers have found evidence that challenges this intuitive division between a 'deciding' and a 'responding' stage in decision making.
ADHD Awareness Month: Why Awareness Matters “Ignorance is bliss” said no mental health professional ever. It’s common for people with ADHD to lack insight into how their symptoms are affecting their lives. But not knowing you … ...
Antipsychotic Drugs Are Finding Their Way Into More Veterans’... Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is one of the most common and difficult disorders to treat in veterans.  Estimates vary, but experts believe that between 10 and 20 percent of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans struggle with the disorder. Considering that nearly three million men and women … ...
Best of Our Blogs: October 7, 2016 There’s something running rampant in the world that can explain strife, depression and general unhappiness. I would argue that that something is self-hatred. It’s all the horrible things we tell ourselves when we’re succeeding and failing that’s responsible for our dis-ease with life. In Uninvited, … ...
It’s Okay to Give Yourself a Break Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. One could argue that all mental illnesses are serious, but bipolar disorder is so debilitating that less than half of those who suffer … ...
Even the Intellectual Vanguard Practices Casual Singlism and Matrimania... Singlism (the stereotyping, stigmatizing, and discrimination against people who are single) is different from other more familiar isms such as racism, heterosexism, and sexism. For example, other isms are sometimes … ...
I’m Not Lazy, I’m Agoraphobic: How One Mother Copes... I’m not lazy, I’m agoraphobic. I used to spend my days at work, my nights in Manhattan, and my weekends filled with adventure and road trips. Now, if I am able to leave my house for a medical appointment, it’s an accomplishment. I’ve had “episodes” … ...
Cognitive behavioral therapy for phobias reduces cerebral blood flow to certain brain areas Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for a phobia can reduce cerebral blood flow, according to a recent study published this September in Brain and Behavior. The study is the first to use arterial spin labeling to measure cerebral blood flow changes in phobia-associated regions following CBT. A specific phobia, such as spider phobia, is an anxiety [...]
New study shows the positive cognitive effects of dance and music training Endless hours at the barre. Long afternoons practising scales. All that time you spent in piano lessons and dance classes as a youngster may have seemed like a pain, but new research now confirms what your parents claimed: it’s good for mind and body. In fact, a recent study published in NeuroImage by a team [...]
What Twitter behavior accompanies mental health crises? A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association indicates that there were two specific types of heightened Twitter discussions in 2014 related to mental health: expected increases in response to planned behavioral health events and unexpected increases in response to unanticipated events. To date, no studies have analyzed communication on [...]
Proteins produced by gut bacteria may cause misfolding of brain proteins Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are all characterized by clumped, misfolded proteins and inflammation in the brain. In more than 90 percent of cases, physicians and scientists do not know what causes these processes to occur. Robert P. Friedland, M.D., the Mason C. and Mary D. Rudd Endowed Chair [...]
Mental illness genetically linked to drug use and misuse There are many reports of drug use leading to mental health problems, and we all know of someone having a few too many drinks to cope with a bad day. Many people who are diagnosed with a mental health disorder indulge in drugs, and vice versa. As severity of both increase, problems arise and they [...]
Human neurons continue to migrate after birth, research finds Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered a previously unknown mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain’s frontal cortex during the first few months after birth, revealing a stage of brain development that had previously gone unrecognized. The authors hypothesize that this late-stage migration may play a role in establishing fundamentally human cognitive abilities [...]
Enjoying your workout is the best motivation, new study finds It’s an all too familiar story: Despite resolutions to lose weight, get in shape, or simply stay fit, it’s all too easy to fall off the exercise band wagon. Studies estimate that up to 50% of gym members drop out within the first six months of a new exercise program. But why is it so [...]