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ADHD Awareness Month: Why Awareness Matters “Ignorance is bliss” said no mental health professional ever. It’s common for people with ADHD to lack insight into how their symptoms are affecting their lives. But not knowing you … ...
Antipsychotic Drugs Are Finding Their Way Into More Veterans’... Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is one of the most common and difficult disorders to treat in veterans.  Estimates vary, but experts believe that between 10 and 20 percent of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans struggle with the disorder. Considering that nearly three million men and women … ...
Best of Our Blogs: October 7, 2016 There’s something running rampant in the world that can explain strife, depression and general unhappiness. I would argue that that something is self-hatred. It’s all the horrible things we tell ourselves when we’re succeeding and failing that’s responsible for our dis-ease with life. In Uninvited, … ...
It’s Okay to Give Yourself a Break Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. One could argue that all mental illnesses are serious, but bipolar disorder is so debilitating that less than half of those who suffer … ...
Even the Intellectual Vanguard Practices Casual Singlism and Matrimania... Singlism (the stereotyping, stigmatizing, and discrimination against people who are single) is different from other more familiar isms such as racism, heterosexism, and sexism. For example, other isms are sometimes … ...
I’m Not Lazy, I’m Agoraphobic: How One Mother Copes... I’m not lazy, I’m agoraphobic. I used to spend my days at work, my nights in Manhattan, and my weekends filled with adventure and road trips. Now, if I am able to leave my house for a medical appointment, it’s an accomplishment. I’ve had “episodes” … ...
Cognitive behavioral therapy for phobias reduces cerebral blood flow to certain brain areas Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for a phobia can reduce cerebral blood flow, according to a recent study published this September in Brain and Behavior. The study is the first to use arterial spin labeling to measure cerebral blood flow changes in phobia-associated regions following CBT. A specific phobia, such as spider phobia, is an anxiety [...]
New study shows the positive cognitive effects of dance and music training Endless hours at the barre. Long afternoons practising scales. All that time you spent in piano lessons and dance classes as a youngster may have seemed like a pain, but new research now confirms what your parents claimed: it’s good for mind and body. In fact, a recent study published in NeuroImage by a team [...]
What Twitter behavior accompanies mental health crises? A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association indicates that there were two specific types of heightened Twitter discussions in 2014 related to mental health: expected increases in response to planned behavioral health events and unexpected increases in response to unanticipated events. To date, no studies have analyzed communication on [...]
Proteins produced by gut bacteria may cause misfolding of brain proteins Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are all characterized by clumped, misfolded proteins and inflammation in the brain. In more than 90 percent of cases, physicians and scientists do not know what causes these processes to occur. Robert P. Friedland, M.D., the Mason C. and Mary D. Rudd Endowed Chair [...]
Mental illness genetically linked to drug use and misuse There are many reports of drug use leading to mental health problems, and we all know of someone having a few too many drinks to cope with a bad day. Many people who are diagnosed with a mental health disorder indulge in drugs, and vice versa. As severity of both increase, problems arise and they [...]
Human neurons continue to migrate after birth, research finds Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered a previously unknown mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain’s frontal cortex during the first few months after birth, revealing a stage of brain development that had previously gone unrecognized. The authors hypothesize that this late-stage migration may play a role in establishing fundamentally human cognitive abilities [...]
Enjoying your workout is the best motivation, new study finds It’s an all too familiar story: Despite resolutions to lose weight, get in shape, or simply stay fit, it’s all too easy to fall off the exercise band wagon. Studies estimate that up to 50% of gym members drop out within the first six months of a new exercise program. But why is it so [...]
Delinquent youths with PTSD need individualized treatment, studies suggest Juvenile offenders who have a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder are at 67 percent greater risk of entering substance abuse treatment within seven years, a new study found. “It’s quite shocking, honestly, and really speaks to the lasting impact of early childhood trauma,” said lead author Jordan Davis, a doctoral student in social work at [...]
Brain’s biological clock stimulates thirst before sleep The brain’s biological clock stimulates thirst in the hours before sleep, according to a study published in the journal Nature by McGill University researchers. The finding — along with the discovery of the molecular process behind it — provides the first insight into how the clock regulates a physiological function. And while the research was [...]
Introducing When Hope Speaks Regular readers of Watersedge will recognise the name Jessica Morris. Aside from contributing to the blog, she also oversees the social media and editorial content on our website. She has been open and honest about her own struggles with mental illness, giving us an insight into her experiences of therapy, teen to adulthood transition, and […]
Balancing Sobriety and Child Rearing in Recovery   If you don’t have your children, sobriety just doesn’t mean as much. But what can you do? How do you fulfill your commitment to your “program” AND put in … ...
Are Trust Issues Ruining Your Life? The development of trust issues is common in any of the forms of dysfunctional homes. Whether you are being abused in some fashion, fear losing a parent’s love or fear … ...
Alzheimer and Familial Support: 7 Caregiving Concerns Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is characterized as a brain disorder that seriously affects a person’s ability to carry out daily … ...
7 Tips for Coping with Life After a Hurricane Life after a hurricane or other natural disaster is rarely easy. Not only do you have to meet your basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter, but such events also take a significant emotional toll. Losing your home or coming back to a home full … ...