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Dyslexics show a difference in sensory processing: Reduced plasticity could account for reading difficulties Neuroscientists at MIT and Boston University have discovered that a basic mechanism underlying sensory perception is deficient in individuals with dyslexia, according to study published December 21 in Neuron. The brain typically adapts rapidly to sensory input, such as the sound of a person’s voice or images of faces and objects, as a way to [...]
Study: Children can ‘catch’ social bias through non-verbal signals expressed by adults Most conscientious adults tend to avoid making biased or discriminatory comments in the presence of children. But new research from the University of Washington suggests that preschool-aged children can learn bias even through nonverbal signals displayed by adults, such as a condescending tone of voice or a disapproving look. Published Dec. 21 in the journal [...]
Helping pays off: People who care for others live longer Older people who help and support others are also doing themselves a favor. An international research team has found that grandparents who care for their grandchildren on average live longer than grandparents who do not. The researchers conducted survival analyses of over 500 people aged between 70 and 103 years, drawing on data from the [...]
Should Psychology Play Some Part in Presidential Politics? Ought we be publicly diagnosing our politicians?
Study IDs key indicators linking violence and mental illness New research from North Carolina State University, RTI International, Arizona State University and Duke University Medical Center finds a host of factors that are associated with subsequent risk of adults with mental illness becoming victims or perpetrators of violence. The work highlights the importance of interventions to treat mental-health problems in order to reduce community [...]
Ways How Not To Raise Ungrateful Children Billy the Kid: THIS YEAR YOU ARE GIVING ME EVERYTHING! Caption: Billy Was A Quick Study On Givers And Takers Parents: rich, middle-class, poor or highly educated or drop-out CAN … ...
What Makes the Perfect Gift? Maybe Not What You Think Lately, I’ve been shopping for holiday gifts, which raises questions. What makes a good gift? Is it better to surprise people, or to shop from a list they provide? Should I spend hours searching for just the right gift? If you’ve asked yourself these kinds … ...
When the holidays aren’t the happiest time of the year During the holidays, there’s an overwhelming sense that we should be happy. Christmas carols are sung, decorations are put up, family and friends reunite and people swap gifts. All of these activities can be wonderful, joyous things. But for many of us, they’re not—and that’s okay. There are lots of reasons the holidays can be […]
There May Be More Eyes on You Than You Think New studies find evidence of an “invisibility cloak illusion.”
Bullied Children Grow Up to be Overweight Adults A good friend of mine has a son, who at 31, is severely overweight. Talking to him one day, I discovered he’d been bullied all through school because of a … ...
Self-Defeating Personality Disorder Some people seem their own worst enemy. Why do they irrationally put themselves in this position? And, more importantly what can we do to help them
Aphrodite and Dionysus Linda: Lack of or a low sexual desire is the most common sexual challenge, about which physicians hear numerous complaints. Doctors and psychotherapists call this Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). … ...
Overcoming the Allure of Fake News When are we most likely to believe fake news? Here's how to identify and overcome our own gullibility.
Scientists discover concussion biomarker The secret to reliably diagnosing concussions lies in the brain's ability to process sound, according to a new study. Widely considered a crisis in professional sports and youth athletic programs, sports-related concussions have had devastating neurological, physical, social and emotional consequences for millions of athletes.
Promising discovery for a non-invasive early detection of Alzheimer's disease A team of scientists has pioneered new technology that detects in human blood platelets the pathological oligomeric forms of brain tau protein in patients with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, leading toward high relevance findings for the research community.
How Writers Are Inspired By Their Muse “Don’t wait for the muse. As I’ve said, he’s a hardheaded guy who’s not susceptible to a lot of creative fluttering. This isn’t the Ouija board or the spirit-world we’re … ...
Here's why you don't feel jet-lagged when you run a fever A clump of just a few thousand brain cells, no bigger than a mustard seed, controls the daily ebb and flow of most bodily processes in mammals -- sleep/wake cycles, most notably. Now, scientists report direct evidence in mice for how those cell clusters control sleep and relay light cues about night and day throughout the body.
ADHD Teaching Tip: How to Use Repetition If you’re teaching students with ADHD, repetition is one of the best tools you have. But what matters is how you use repetition, not just whether you use repetition in … ...
3 Things You Can Do When You’re Alone On...   Feeling lonely, disconnected or down? “Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness.” -Desmond Tutu   It’s hard to feel joyful when … ...
Study: Sleep Problems are Big Challenges for Veterans with... Posttraumatic stress disorder is an often chronic and disabling psychiatric disorder.  It is characterized by several core symptoms including  intrusive thoughts, flashbacks, depression and hyperarousal.  Many individuals suffering from PTSD also experience significant sleep problems.  In fact, sleep disturbance is one of the most common … ...