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Why Our Coercive System of Schooling Should Topple Our coercive system of K-12 schooling has reached the breaking point. It's breaking too many kids. It never worked well, but we've increased its weight to a pathological level.
Best of Our Blogs: December 20, 2016 Instead of, “I was really worried when you didn’t come home,” you say, “You’re always late.” Or instead of, “I get hurt when you say that,” you say, “You’re so insensitive.” The former draws us closer together while the latter divides us. Years of putting walls … ...
Differences Between ADHD & Bipolar Disorder in Children... In children, it can be difficult to differentiate between pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). They are genetically linked, have multiple overlapping symptoms and co-occur at … ...
Annette Karmiloff-Smith has left the building The brilliant developmental neuropsychologist Annette Karmiloff-Smith has passed away and one of the brightest lights into the psychology of children’s development has been dimmed. She actually started her professional life as a simultaneous interpreter for the UN and then went on to study psychology and trained with Jean Piaget. Karmiloff-Smith went into neuropsychology and starting … Continue reading "Annette Karmiloff-Smith has left the building"
“Creativity is Like Exhaling”: Q&A with Artist and Mentor... In my monthly interview series, individuals from all sorts of backgrounds—therapists, artists, authors—talk about the power of creativity in their lives. This month I’m happy to feature Amy Maricle, a … ...
APA Issues Health Care Reform Priorities for Working With Congress and New Administration Calls on Congress not to repeal Affordable Care Act without viable replacement
How Do You Make Decisions? Chocolate or vanilla ice cream? Vacation in the mountains or by the ocean? Getting married or remaining single? We make numerous decisions in any given 24 hour period. Some seem … ...
Insecure People, Controlling Behavior An insecure husband may seek to control his wife with questions as to her whereabouts, or he may use guilt to keep her from seeing her friends and relatives.  “If … ...
It’s Beginning To Look A Lot Like ADHD Christmas I tell you, every year around this time, I start seeing where I’ve made my mistakes. Every year around this time I start understanding how I’ve gotten myself into another … ...
More time talk… More time talk… Lack of time or lack of direction? As a psychotherapist and self-care specialist I talk to people (like all the time).  One of the most common stressors … ...
The man who mistook his wife for an imposter A new study reveals the mystery of delusional misidentification syndromes (DMS), a group of rare disorders that causes patients to become convinced that a loved one has been replaced by an imposter. The investigators mapped brain injuries in 17 patients with DMS to determine origins of these disorders. Injuries were linked to areas in the brain associated with familiarity perception and belief evaluation, providing a neuro-anatomical mechanism underlying misidentification syndromes.
White matter structure in brain predicts cognitive function at ages one and two Patterns of white matter microstructure present at birth and that develop after birth predict the cognitive function of children at ages 1 and 2, new research has found.
Study finds your number of past sexual partners has a large effect on your attractiveness Both men and women view someone with a larger number of past sexual partners as a less attractive option for a relationship, according to a study published in the Journal of Sex Research. Using an Internet survey, the researchers asked 188 participants about their willingness to engage in a long-term relationship or short-term relationship with with a hypothetical individual who [...]
Study finds gamers have enhanced working memory performance New research has found a link between gaming and improvements in some aspects of cognitive functioning. The study of adolescents and young adults found that those with more gaming experience tended to perform better on a test of working memory. The researchers found increased gaming experience was linked to improved response speed and the ability to monitor and [...]
Study: Rational arguments and ridicule can both reduce belief in conspiracy theories Pointing out logical inconsistencies in conspiracy theories can be an effective method of discrediting them, according to new research published in Frontiers in Psychology. The researchers had 813 Hungarian adults listen to a speech outlining a made-up conspiracy that purported to explain how hidden Jewish groups and international financial powers were secretly shaping the fate [...]
Scientists investigate: Does subliminal authoritarian imagery encourages citizens to obey? New research examines whether being subliminally exposed authoritarian iconography encourages the public to comply with and support the state. The study of 123 adult residents of the United Arab Emirates —  a federation of absolute monarchies — found that subliminally flashing images of the country’s ruler had no statistical impact on the participants’ compliance with or support for the [...]
Researchers reveal regions of the brain implicated in delusional misidentification syndromes Neuroscientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have mapped the brain injuries – or lesions – that result in delusional misidentification syndromes (DMS), a group of rare disorders that leaves patients convinced people and places aren’t really as they seem. In a study published in the journal Brain, Michael D. Fox, MD, PhD, Director [...]
Neglect and abuse in childhood could have long-term economic consequences People who suffer neglect and abuse in childhood are much more likely to have time off work due to long-term sickness and less likely to own their own homes when they reach middle age than their peers, according to new research undertaken at UCL. The study, which is published in U.S. journal Pediatrics and undertaken [...]
Study: Multi-social millennials more likely to be depressed and anxious Compared with the total time spent on social media, use of multiple platforms is more strongly associated with depression and anxiety among young adults, the University of Pittsburgh Center for Research on Media, Technology and Health (CRMTH) found in a national survey. The analysis, published online and scheduled for the April print issue of the [...]
Children with higher genetic risk for obesity respond more strongly to fast food ads Dartmouth researchers have found that children with a genetic risk for obesity had greater activity in brain reward centers when watching fast food commercials, which could help us to understand why some children are more likely to overeat. The study is the first-of-its kind to examine how a key obesity gene influences brain response to [...]