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Two genetic wrongs make a biochemical right In a biological quirk that promises to provide researchers with a new approach for studying and potentially treating Fragile X syndrome, scientists have shown that knocking out a gene important for messenger RNA translation in neurons restores memory deficits and reduces behavioral symptoms in a ...
Bullied teen, mom battle back with anti-bullying group Anti-bullying group puts members in touch with anti-bullying resources including laws, processes, and advice for those being bullied.
Kennedy's vision for mental health never realized The last piece of legislation President John F. Kennedy signed before his death was the Community Mental Health Act.
What's Wrong With Empathy? It was the cold light of reason"”based of course on false beliefs"”that gave us laws permitting slavery, burning human beings at the stake, and bear baiting as a form of entertainment. It was empathy for the victim that ended these practices. read more
The psychology of spiritualism: science and seances The idea of summoning the spirits took thrilling hold of the Victorian imagination – and has its adherents now. But the psychology behind spiritualism is more intriguingAs the evenings get darker and the first hint of winter hangs in the air, the western world enters the season of the dead. It ...
Why Zimbardo's Prison Experiment Isn't in My Textbook One of the questions I'm often asked by professors who teach from my introductory psychology textbook is this: "Why don't you include Zimbardo's classic Stanford Prison Experiment in your book, like all other introductory psychology textbook authors do?" Here's why.read more
This column will change your life: the truth about inefficiency 'You don't procrastinate, or miss appointments, or fail to communicate with your spouse because you're an idiot who doesn't realise there's a better way. You do it because there's a hidden benefit you're getting'A few months back, the sci-fi author John Scalzi "finally did what I should have done ...
The Making of an Olympian Forty-five years ago today, at the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, Bob Beamon won the gold medal in the long jump with a belief-defying jump of twenty-nine feet, two-and-one-quarter inches, breaking the world record by nearly two feet. How did Beamon jump so far? The making of an Olympian...read ...
Learning dialects shapes brain areas that process spoken language Using advanced imaging to visualize brain areas used for understanding language in native Japanese speakers, a new study finds that the pitch-accent in words pronounced in standard Japanese activates different brain hemispheres depending on whether the listener speaks standard Japanese or one of ...
Social Rejection Triggers Release of Natural Painkillers in the Brain New study demonstrates that the brain treats social pain in a similar way to physical pain.→ Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick"
Why Can't I Get Over My Ex? Why Can't I Get Over My Ex? We are all familiar with people who have gone through a break up in which persistent thoughts about the ex seem to linger. The relationship is over, hopes of reconciliation have been exhausted...and yet the ex retains a special place in the stricken one's heart. Could ...
Four ways to avoid becoming a leading sex pest | Chris Chambers and Pete Etchells Be self-aware, recognise the trappings of power, deal with harassment proactively, and appreciate what leadership is really aboutChris ChambersPete Etchells
Why Do Human Beings Do Good Things? The Puzzle of Altruism There is no need to make excuses for altruism. Rather than being unnatural, altruism is an expression of our most fundamental nature"”that of connectedness. read more
Psychologists report new insights on human brain, consciousness A study by psychologists is a step toward neuroscience research on consciousness. "The difference between being conscious and unconscious is a bit like the difference between driving from Los Angeles to New York in a straight line versus having to cover the same route hopping on and off several ...
Your Social Life Is Not Your Social Media Just as businesses and brands use social media to interact with their target audience and monitor consumer interest, people are using social media to gauge how their friends and acquaintances feel about them.read more
Brain may flush out toxins during sleep Using mice, researchers showed for the first time that the space between brain cells may increase during sleep, allowing the brain to flush out toxins that build up during waking hours. These results suggest a new role for sleep in health and disease.
How subtle movements, facial features could predict your demise Research shows that interviewers -- who were not health professionals -- could better predict mortality than physicians or individuals themselves. This is likely, the researchers report, because they were attuned to facial expressions, responsiveness and overall agility.
War is not inevitable; psychology research should promote peace In a new review of how psychology research has illuminated the causes of war and violence, three political psychologists say this understanding can and should be used to promote peace and overturn the belief that violent conflict is inevitable.
Brain scans may aid in diagnosis of autism The investigators found that brain connectivity data from 19 paths in brain scans predicted whether the participants had autism, with an accuracy rate of 95.9 percent.
Bird study finds key info about human speech-language development A study has shown for the first time how two tiny molecules regulate a gene implicated in speech and language impairments as well as autism disorders, and that social context of vocal behavior governs their function.