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When Your Patient Gets Angry If you’ve grown up on Marvel Comics, you know the Incredible Hulk’s line: “Don’t make me angry. You wouldn’t like me when I’m angry.” Some of our patients are like that. Underneath their seemingly calm presentation, they are angry. They are angry at the world. … ...
Study: Change Your DNA with Mind-Body Interventions Meditation, tai chi and yoga — we know how good it feels to practice these and other mind-body traditions. We become more relaxed. More focused. We find ourselves becoming better partners, parents and coworkers. A new study, though, shows just how deeply these mind-body interventions … ...
Individualism Goes Global: More Live Alone, Value Friends A study of 51 years of data from 78 nations shows a rise in individualism around the globe. More people are living alone, divorcing, and valuing their friends over their family.
A Weird Psychological Cure For Back Pain And Tiredness Back pain treatment could also help treat depression, fatigue and common digestive disorders. • Try one of PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (NEW) The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything
Using Technology to Help Us Practice Mindfulness Often we think that technology and mindfulness are opposites. We think they’re at odds. When we think about practicing mindfulness or meditation, we think about putting away our phones. We think about turning off the TV. We think about shutting down all our devices. We think … ...
Heading in The Right Direction: The Brain's Internal Compass New research reveals how neurons make a sense of direction.
Have Trouble Remembering Names? Try this Proven Trick Everyone wishes to have a better memory for faces, but so far there's been no magic bullet. A new study based on a popular game shows how to make that magic work for you.
Psychology Around the Net: July 29, 2017 Happy Saturday, sweet readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes a look at the benefits of accepting our darker emotions, how dangerous false memories are in the criminal justice system, how there actually is some instant gratification to exercising, and more. Accepting Your Darkest … ...
Don’t speculate on others’ mental health from afar In The Guardian, Nick Davis makes a clear and timely case for affirming The Goldwater Rule. The Rule, which binds members of the American Psychiatric Association, forbids giving an opinion on the mental state of someone you have not examined. The US president’s behaviour has brought the rule back into the public eye, but Davis … Continue reading "Don’t speculate on others’ mental health from afar"
Scientists reawaken memory in mice that had a condition resembling Alzheimer’s Research suggests that the condition may not destroy memories but instead impair our ability to recall them.
The Forgotten: Children of Narcissistic Parents Paul reluctantly began therapy after a poor review at work. His office did a 360 approach which involved getting input from other team members, clients, and superiors prior to the formal evaluation. The process revealed that Paul lacked effective communication skills, procrastinated unnecessarily, didn’t cooperate … ...
My Health Above All Else! Life is all about balance and as a person with bipolar disorder it is not something I am good at. I struggle finding the balance in my life whether it be with my personal relationships or my work life. I struggle, more than the normal … ...
Hunger-controlling brain cells may offer path for new obesity drugs Scientists identified two new populations of cells in the brain that potently regulate appetite. The two types of cells, located in a part of the brainstem called the dorsal raphe nucleus, are potential targets for new drugs to treat obesity by controlling the hunger signals that drive the search for and consumption of food.
Five Major Questions (and Answers) About Dreaming Dreaming is a strange and mysterious process—one that scientists don’t fully understand. Let’s take a closer look at the stuff of which dreams are made.
How to Recognize Your Possibilities — Especially When You... “We have more possibilities available in each moment than we realize.” – Thich Nhat Hanh When problems arise, don’t you often think about first is that you can’t get past them? Then follows circuitous thinking fueled by becoming so consumed and distracted by the problem … ...
6 Inner Resources You Didn't Know You Had Character strengths come in many shapes and sizes. Lost strengths. Happiness strengths. How might you use each category of strengths to make the most of your life?
The Top 10 Regrets People Have About Their Lives The smouldering regret that is most widespread won’t surprise you. • Try one of PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (NEW) The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything
8 Foods that Boost Your Mood What we eat might not be able to cure us indefinitely from depression. I learned that hard lesson earlier this year. However, researchers are compiling strong evidence that what we eat can influence our risk for developing depression and can keep persons in remission from … ...
Dementia: BACE inhibitor improves brain function The protein amyloid beta is believed to be the major cause of Alzheimer's disease. Substances that reduce the production of amyloid beta, such as BACE inhibitors, are therefore promising candidates for new drug treatments. Scientists have recently demonstrated that one such BACE inhibitor reduces the amount of amyloid beta in the brain. By doing so, it can restore the normal function of nerve cells and significantly improve memory performance.
Football judgments and driving too fast: The science of judging speed Football officials watching slow-motion clips or drivers changing from motorways to 30 mph zones could be unconsciously misjudging speed -- and the motivations behind a person's movements -- because their perceptions of 'normal' have been altered by recent experiences, new research has found.