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Study shows violent video games may be tied to aggressive thoughts Kids who often play violent video games may show more aggression later on, and more often believe hitting is acceptable, than kids who don't play them.
New depths of complexity in nerve cells discovered The protein CaM Kinase II plays a significant role in controlling when and where neuropeptides are released from neurons, researchers have found using mutant C. elegans. Using a method called "forward genetics," the researchers randomly screened thousands of mutant worms for defects in neuropeptide storage and unexpectedly identified mutant worms lacking CaM Kinase II. Further analysis revealed that CaM Kinase II plays a significant role in controlling when and where neuropeptides are released from neurons.
Fundamentals of facial recognition: Specialized brain mechanisms for recognizing faces? Scientists showed that participants suffering from face blindness performed as well as the average person in training measuring their ability to learn a set of computer-generated objects called greebles. The findings undermine the leading alternative to the idea that prosopagnosia is the result of damage to brain mechanisms specifically devoted to processing faces, and thus indicate that people recognize faces using face-specific brain mechanisms.
For neurons in the brain, identity can be used to predict location There are many types of neurons, defined largely by the patterns of genes they use, and they 'live' in distinct brain regions. But researchers do not yet have a comprehensive understanding of these neuronal types and how they are distributed in the brain. A team of scientists describes a new mathematical model that combines large data sets to predict where different types of cells are located within the brain.
How does one cope with ambiguous loss? The case of the disappeared Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 The continuing confusion and lack of definitive information about the whereabouts of Malaysian Airline MH370 for over two weeks (when this post is written), has focused the world-s attention on the suffering of the family and friends of the 239 missing passengers. It is difficult to even imagine what these family members and friends are going through. This article looks at how we can help those coping with an ambiguous loss such as is the case for the family and loved ones of those missing on MH370.
Ambiguous loss and Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 presents us with another painful example of ambiguous loss.read more
No longer junk: Role of long noncoding RNAs in autism risk RNA acts as the intermediary between genes and proteins, but the function of pieces of RNA that do not code for protein has, historically, been less clear. Researchers have ignored these noncoding RNAs until recently for not complying with the central dogma of biology "” that a straight line runs from gene to RNA (transcription) to protein (translation). However, noncoding RNAs are emerging as important regulators of diverse cellular processes with implications for numerous human disorders.
This 'busy-bragging' epidemic must be stopped. If only we could find the time Talking about your overstuffed schedule makes you and everyone else more stressed. So why is it so hard to resist – and how can we find a bit of calm?Oliver Burkeman
Leaders wired to be task-focused or team-builders, but can be both Academics have written about distinctions between a task-oriented leader and a social-emotional leader for 50 years. But new research strongly suggests the distinction has a foundation in our brains -- which allows us to be either analytical or empathetic, but not both at the same time -- researchers report. Managers don't have to be one or the other, they say. The presence of both capabilities in a normal brain suggests the opposite is true.
Diabetes drug shows promise in reducing Alzheimer's disease in an experimental model The diabetic drug, pramlintide, reduces amyloid-beta peptides, a major component of Alzheimer's disease in the brain and improves learning and memory in two experimental Alzheimer's disease models, researchers have discovered. These results also found Alzheimer's disease patients have a lower level of amylin in blood compared to those without this disease, and may provide a new avenue for both treatment and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.
Empathy: Women Better Under Stress But Men Worse Surprise difference between men and women baffles researchers.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:The Psychology of Storytelling and Empathy, Animated Are Men or Women More Cooperative? Rethinking The Stress Mindset: Can You Find The Upside of Pressure? Childhood Poverty and Stress Harms Adult Brain Function Women 3 Times More Likely to Wear Red or Pink When Fertile
Nasal spray delivers new type of depression treatment A nasal spray that delivers a peptide to treat depression holds promise as a potential alternative therapeutic approach, research shows. This peptide treatment interferes with the binding of two dopamine receptors -- the D1 and D2 receptor complex. The research team had found that this binding was higher in the brains of people with major depression. Disrupting the binding led to the anti-depressant effects.
How To Be Patient In the book Siddhartha by Herman Hesse, the main character, Siddhartha, tells Kamala, a beautiful courtesan: "From the moment I made [the resolution to learn about love from the most beautiful woman] I also knew that I would execute it...when you throw a stone into the water, it finds the quickest way to the bottom of the water.read more
American Psychological Association Seeks Applicants for the APA Excellence in Librarianship Award
How Body Language Lets Us Down Body language can be so seductive. It can also be terribly misleading. It can be lead us astray in the bedroom, in politics, in the marketplace, and in everyday life. It can also be nearly useless in airport screenings.read more
Electric 'thinking cap' controls learning speed Caffeine-fueled cram sessions are routine occurrences on any college campus. But what if there was a better, safer way to learn new or difficult material more quickly? What if "thinking caps" were real? Scientists have now shown that it is possible to selectively manipulate our ability to learn through the application of a mild electrical current to the brain, and that this effect can be enhanced or depressed depending on the direction of the current.
Why Hierarchy Stifles Creativity Hierarchies are great sometimes, just not necessarily for finding great ideas.read more
Sleep Deprivation: The 10 Most Profound Psychological Effects Lack of sleep may feel horrible, but what is it really doing to the mind and brain?→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Why the Sleep-Deprived Crave Junk Food and Buy Higher Calorie Foods The Miracle and Mystery of Sleep: 12 Remarkable Psychological Studies Hidden Caves in the Brain Open Up During Sleep to Wash Away Toxins Later School Start Times Improve Sleep and Daytime Functioning in Adolescents Offline Learning: How The Mind Learns During Sleep
Something else for women to fret about: A greater risk of Alzheimer's More women than men suffer from Alzheimer's disease.
Do Binaural Beats Work? In the hunt for more control over your mental states, many people are turning to the idea of binaural beats in a bid to create desired mental experiences, increase creativity, treat depression and anxiety, lose weight, quit smoking and even become lucid while dreaming. This is something that, surprisingly, hasn’t got the biggest presence on […]