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Can Six Astronauts Live Together for 17 Months And Not Go Crazy? The "Mars500 " project was the most ambitious attempt yet to simulate the conditions of an expedition to the Red Planet. A newly published study assesses the psychological well-being of the crew during their "mission"—and reveals what it was like to live in cramped quarters with 6 people for 520 days.Read more...
Biological evidence of positive and negative people in the world The ability to stay positive when times get tough -- and, conversely, of being negative -- may be hardwired in the brain, finds new research. The study focused on women because they are twice as likely as men to suffer from anxiety related problems and previously reported sex differences in brain structure and function could have obscured the results.
How Assertive Should You Be? The Answers Will Surprise You. The cultural wisdom tells us to speak up and make ourselves heard, to lean in, and be assertive. But where's the line in the sand? Can we find the spot between obnoxious jerk and hopeless wimp?read more
Body swapping: the science behind the switch | Dean Burnett An individual finding themselves in a totally different body is a familiar occurrence in fiction, one which usually results in various wacky antics. But according to current scientific understanding, if such a thing were even possible, the consequences would likely be quite traumatic Next year sees the release of the Ben Kingsley/Ryan Reynolds film Selfless, where a wealthy elderly dying man transfers his consciousness from his diseased and ravaged body into a younger, sexier one. This is quite a familiar trope in fiction, the body swap, where a character finds his or herself inhabiting a completely different body. Sometimes its an individual ending up in an unfamiliar form, other times its two people known to each other who somehow end up swapping bodies. One of the earliest known examples of the body swap is the 19th century novel Vice Versa, but its been used often since. As well as mainstream comedies like Freaky Friday or The Change Up where its essentially a comedic device, there are variations of it in the literature, some of which try to explain the process without using magic. Richard Morgans brilliant (but brutal) cyberpunk Altered Carbon series describes a future where consciousness has been digitised, meaning it can be stored as you would a computer file. This leads to minds being transferred between bodies like operating systems between computers. Continue reading...
Has cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis been oversold? CBT is a recommended treatment for schizophrenia in the UK, but how strong is the evidence that it works? Keith Laws suggests it's not as strong as we might hope.In 1952, the same year that chlorpromazine was introduced as the first effective drug treatment for schizophrenia, Aaron Beck first employed a form of cognitive-based talk therapy to treat delusional thinking. While chlorpromazine inaugurated the era of drug treatments in psychiatry, Becks psychological alternative was a slow-burner. Cognitive Therapy or Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), as we now know it, became part of the mainstream treatment for psychosis in the UK in 2002 when the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) endorsed it; and again in 2009, they further recommended that CBT be offered to all people with psychosis or schizophrenia." Despite repeated endorsements by this Government agency, is it possible that CBT for psychosis has been oversold?NICE, along with almost everyone else nowadays, 'takes stock' of the results of clinical trials by using the quantitative technique of meta-analysis. This allows findings of different trials to be mathematically summed, giving more weight to larger (and usually methodologically more rigorous) trials. Notably the dozen meta-analyses of trials investigating CBT for schizophrenia document the shrinking evidence for its effectiveness on symptoms. Although initial meta-analyses optimistically suggested that around 50% of patients showed significant symptom reduction following CBT, more recent meta-analyses estimate that just 5% benefit significantly when compared to controls. Continue reading...
“Doc Fix” Bill Protects Medicare Patients’ Access to Psychological Services Medicare payment cut averted for one year, but APAPO says payment system must be repealed
Does Short-Term Relief Work? Short term relief does not last. It can in fact become a separate psychological issue unto itself.When John saw me for help, he has been under psychiatric treatment for over 10 years. Despite the length of his treatment, he remained "stuck" within himself - psychologically, emotionally, behaviorally, relationally, spiritually. Looking for relief from his pain or agony, he has been doing it through brain drugs, marijuana, alcohol, nicotine, money, and raging all these years.
Violent Video Games May Increase Aggression in Kids after all Violent video games really do boost aggressive behavior in children, according to a new study. Even after accounting for parental involvement, gender, age and other factors, psychologists at Iowa ...
Preventing relapse in cocaine-addicted patients with new methods Relapse is the most painful and expensive feature of drug addiction -"” even after addicted individuals have been drug-free for months or years, the likelihood of sliding back into the habit remains high. Though some relapse triggers can be consciously avoided, such as people, places and things related to drug use, other subconscious triggers related to the brain's reward system may be impossible to avoid -"” they can gain entry to the unconscious brain, setting the stage for relapse.
Oxytocin, 'love hormone,' promotes group lying, according to researchers Oxytocin is a peptide of nine amino acids produced in the brain's hypothalamus, functioning as both a hormone and neurotransmitter. Research has shown that in addition to its bonding effect in couples and between mothers and babies, it also stimulates one's social approach. "Our results suggest people are willing to bend ethical rules to help the people close to us, like our team or family," says the lead researcher. "This raises an interesting, although perhaps more philosophical, question: Are all lies immoral?"
Child's obesity, cognitive function linked, study finds Obese children are slower than healthy-weight children to recognize when they have made an error and correct it, research shows. The research is the first to show that weight status not only affects how quickly children react to stimuli but also impacts the level of activity that occurs in the cerebral cortex during action monitoring.
Physical Effects of Sleep Deprivation Everybody needs to sleep. The average human being requires about 7 hours of sleep, however newborn babies sleep the most, between 12 and 18 hours a night and the amount of sleep we require usually decreases as we get older. With intensified work schedules, family commitments and 24 hour entertainment available to us, many people […]
Report details dramatic racial gap among U.S. children White and Asian children are better positioned for success, according to a new report appealing for urgent action to bridge racial gaps.
Bullying happens to popular teens, too Research suggests a previously overlooked group of bullying victims: the kids who are popular, but not quite at the top of the school's hierarchy.
The Human Face Is Far More Expressive Than We Thought In a study that now seems embarrassingly overdue, scientists have tripled the list of human facial expressions from six to 21 — adding such emotions as "sadly surprised" and "happily disgusted."Read more...
I had a black dog, his name was depression Millions of people around the world live with depression. Many of these ...
How Much Should You Reveal in Your Relationships? It can be tricky negotiating the right amount to disclose about yourself with your relationship partners. If you reveal too much too early, you'll seem a bit too eager, and if you always hold back, people will wonder what you're hiding. Research on self-disclosure suggests some ways to find that happy balance.read more
New test makes Parkinson's-like disorder of middle age detectable in young adulthood The very earliest signs of a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder, in which physical symptoms are not apparent until the fifth decade of life, are detectable in individuals as young as 30 years old using a new, sophisticated type of neuroimaging, researchers have found. People with the condition -- fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) -- experience tremors, poor balance, cognitive impairments and Parkinsonism. The genetic condition results from a mutation in the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR1).
New discovery gives hope that nerves could be repaired after spinal cord injury It could one day be possible to chemically reprogram and repair damaged nerves after spinal cord injury or brain trauma, a new discovery suggests.
A Memory Experiment That Would Make A Good Parlor Game There are all kinds of ways to make people misremember things. But can you make a person misremember a specific word? This might be an interesting parlor game, or an interesting mass experiment.Read more...