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Proteomics discovers link between muscle damage and cerebral malaria Malaria-related complications remain a major cause of death for children in many parts of the world. Why some children develop these complications while others don't is still not understood. Scientists now report results of a systematic proteomics approach to the question.
Psychological Crutches: Ten Myths and Three Tips We assume psychological crutches are bad, and yet we all use them. The question isn't whether to depend on them but which ones to depend upon. This article ends with three guidelines we intuit matter to sorting good from bad crutches.read more
4 Tips to Help You with Your Grief and Loss Grief is unique to the individual. We all grieve differently and for this reason there is no set pattern to follow. It is my belief that grief and pain remain with us; however we can learn to live with these feelings successfully, doing so without diminishing the value of the causation of grief. We often […]
In Defense of the Eyeball Test Some findings are perfect without being too good to be true. In such a case, statistics are beside the point. read more
Inhibited children become anxious adults: Examining the causes and effects of early shyness Three little girls sit together in a room, playing with the toys surrounding them. One of the girls -- "Emma" -- has clearly taken charge of the group, and the others happily go along with her. A fourth girl -- "Jane" -- enters the room, hiding her face while clinging to her mother. The first three continue to play, while mom sits Jane down with some toys a few feet away from the group. After mom leaves, however, Jane sits alone against the wall. Emma makes her way over to Jane, inviting her to play with the rest of the group. Jane -- looking trapped -- starts to cry, then stands up and tries desperately to open the door.
Boosting depression-causing mechanisms in brain increases resilience, surprisingly New research uncovers a conceptually novel approach to treating depression. Instead of dampening neuron firing found with stress-induced depression, researchers demonstrated for the first time that further activating these neurons opens a new avenue to mimic and promote natural resilience.
New evidence of suicide epidemic among India's 'marginalized' farmers A new study has found that India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with the most debt-ridden farmers who are clinging to tiny smallholdings -- less than one hectare -- and trying to grow 'cash crops', such as cotton and coffee, that are highly susceptible to global price fluctuations. read more
Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the happy couple. The details reported in the International Journal of Electronic Marketing and Retailing suggest that most people hope to garner social benefits of buying an expensive gift that somehow enhances their relationship with the newlyweds while at the same time they wish to limit monetary cost and save money. read more
Creative activities outside work can improve job performance Employees who pursue creative activities outside of work may find that these activities boost their performance on the job, according to a new study by San Francisco State University organizational psychologist Kevin Eschleman and colleagues. read more
To improve total health and fitness, let's enhance brain functioning Surgeon general says brain health "˜new frontier' (ARNEWS): "Brain health is the "new frontier" in science said Lt. Gen. Patricia D. Horoho as she kicked off a two-day consortium on the topic. Tapping into the full potential of the brain can have immense benefits for Soldiers, their families and the nation, said the Army's surgeon general in [...]
Anti-seizure drug may reduce alcohol consumption, study shows The anti-seizure drug ezogabine, reduced alcohol consumption in an experimental model, researchers report. The findings may lead to more effective treatments for alcoholism. Excessive consumption of alcohol is one of the leading causes of illness and death in the U.S. and has significant negative economic impact by limiting the productivity of workers and necessitating huge health care expenditures.
How vision makes sure that little fish do not get carried away Our eyes not only enable us to recognize objects, they also provide us with a continuous stream of information about our own movements. The world glides by us and leaves a characteristic motion trace on our retinas. Seemingly without effort, our brain calculates self-motion from this "optic flow." This way, we can maintain a stable position and a steady gaze during our own movements. Scientists have now discovered an array of new types of neurons, which help the brain of zebrafish to perceive, and compensate for, self-motion.
New cause of brain bleeding immediately after stroke identified By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage. A complex and devastating neurological condition, stroke is the fourth-leading cause of death and primary reason for disability in the U.S. The blood-brain barrier is severely damaged in a stroke and lets blood-borne material into the brain, causing the permanent deficits in movement and cognition seen in stroke patients.
Neurons in brain tune into different frequencies for different spatial memory tasks Your brain transmits information about your current location and memories of past locations over the same neural pathways using different frequencies of a rhythmic electrical activity called gamma waves, report neuroscientists. The research may provide insight into the cognitive and memory disruptions seen in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's, in which gamma waves are disturbed.
Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution A major challenge of systems biology is understanding how phenomena at the cellular scale correlate with activity at the organism level. A concerted effort has been made especially in the brain, as scientists are aiming to clarify how neural activity is translated into consciousness and other complex brain activities. One example of the technologies needed is whole-brain imaging at single-cell resolution. This imaging normally involves preparing a highly transparent sample that minimizes light scattering and then imaging neurons tagged with fluorescent probes at different slices to produce a 3D representation.
Common links between neurodegenerative diseases identified The pattern of brain alterations may be similar in several different neurodegenerative diseases, which opens the door to alternative therapeutic strategies to tackle these diseases, experts say.
4 Ways Mindfulness Meditation Benefits So Many Conditions Four central components of how mindfulness meditation works.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Meditation Benefits: 10 Ways It Helps Your Mind Mindfulness Meditation: 8 Quick Exercises That Easily Fit into Your Day 4 Wonderful Ways Meditation Relieves Pain Meditation is an Effective Treatment for Depression, Anxiety and Pain Mindfulness at School Decreases Chance of Developing Depression
Conceptual representation in the brain: Towards mind-reading? Your measured brain signals can reveal whether you are thinking about an animal or a tool. That's what neuroscientists discovered during her research, where she investigated the conceptual representation of words and objects in the human brain. This knowledge is useful for the development of tools that convert brain signals into speech.
'Brain training' overcomes tics in Tourette syndrome, study finds Children with Tourette Syndrome (TS) may unconsciously train their brain to more effectively control their tics. Teenagers diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome (TS) were slower than their typically developing peers when asked to perform a task that involved them simply moving their eyes to look at targets. However, they significantly outperformed their peers when the task was more demanding and required them to choose between looking at or away from targets. In this task they were as fast as their peers but made fewer eye movements in the wrong direction.
A wife-chaser made me lose trust in female friends Having had a problem with trust in the past can make someone even more sensitive to a breech of trust. The post A wife-chaser made me lose trust in female friends appeared first on The Friendship Blog.