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Study discusses model for understanding nutrition and brain development For nearly a decade, researchers have studied the piglet as a translational model to understand which aspects of early brain development are affected by nutrition interventions. In a recent review article, investigators provide background for the work they do with nutrition and neurodevelopment using the piglet as a model.
One in 5 adults secretly access their friends’ Facebook accounts Most people are concerned about the prospect of their social media accounts being hacked, but a new study finds that it’s actually people we know who frequently access our accounts without our permission. In a survey of 1,308 U.S. adult Facebook users, University of British Columbia researchers found that 24 per cent – or more [...]
Employee wages not just linked to skills, but quality of co-workers The presence of high-performing co-workers can improve an individual’s earnings, research at the University of York has shown. The team, which included researchers at the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration, University College London (UCL), found that in low-skilled occupations, an increase of 10% in the average performance of co-workers raises a worker’s wage [...]
ADHD Turning Points People who get diagnosed with ADHD as adults often realize in retrospect that the diagnosis was a long time coming. They see how their symptoms shaped their lives going back … ...
Study: In Alzheimer’s, excess tau protein damages brain’s GPS system Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have discovered that the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer’s disease patients is caused by the accumulation of tau protein in navigational nerve cells in the brain. The findings, in mice, could lead to early diagnostic tests for Alzheimer’s and highlight novel targets for treating this [...]
The glorification of history may give rise to a willingness to fight in a war In order to study the perceptions held by people all over the world about different historical figures and events, as well as what the sense of history is, researchers in the UPV/EHU’s consolidated Social Psychology research group participated in the World History Survey (WHS). In it a survey was conducted on the perceptions held about [...]
Teenagers who access mental health services see significant improvements, study shows Young people with mental health problems who have contact with mental health services are significantly less likely to suffer from clinical depression later in their adolescence than those with equivalent difficulties who do not receive treatment, according to new research from the University of Cambridge. This comes as Prime Minister Theresa May announced measures to [...]
So You’re Thinking You Need to Divorce… You’re about to enter one of the most emotional and tumultuous periods of your life, especially if you have children. While pain and grief are inevitable, there are definitely better … ...
Are Your Therapist Buddies Bringing You Down? Stop. Grab a pen. Make a list of the five people you talk to the most. Go ahead, I’ll wait. Done? Excellent! In a 2007 study, some scientists discovered that obesity spreads. Investigators found that when our closes friends become obese, we have a 57% chance of following … ...
What causes sleepiness when sickness strikes It’s well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it’s a microscopic roundworm that’s providing an explanation of how that occurs, according to a study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A study published this week in eLife reveals the mechanism for [...]
Why the lights don’t dim when we blink Every few seconds, our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets. So why doesn’t blinking plunge us into intermittent darkness and light? New research led by the University of California, Berkeley, shows that the brain works extra hard to stabilize our vision despite our fluttering eyes. Scientists at UC Berkeley, Nanyang [...]
10 reasons you’re becoming burnt out Burn out. Two words no one wants to hear but we all must succumb too eventually. Anyone who has been burnt out will tell you it occurs when you’re at the end of your rope. Your body is exhausted, your mind is exhausted, and you’re entire being refuses to get up and function. At its […]
The Danger of Lead Exposure to Prenatal Neurodevelopment... During the prenatal period, the fetus begins to form one of the most complex structures in nature, the human brain. This process is called neural embryogenesis and it represents one of the most complicated processes in prenatal life. The process relies on the tight regulation … ...
The Science of Swearing How much do you really know about swearing? Or if that question is too broad, here’s a more specific one: how many swear words can you name? This second question is one that psychologists sometimes ask study participants. Researchers call the number of taboo words someone can summon up one’s...
Why Inner Conflict Is Your Most Important Issue –... Neurotics are torn by inner conflict … Every neurotic … is at war with himself. ~ Karen Horney Inner conflict is a vague term that doesn’t communicate the actual dynamic … ...
Why Inner Conflict May Be your Most Important Issue... Inner conflict is a vague term that doesn’t communicate the actual inner dynamic or real world symptoms a self-conflicted person suffers. Due to a general lack of practical information regarding … ...
Computer-based cognitive training program may help patients with severe tinnitus Researchers evaluated the effect of a cognitive training program on tinnitus, and report positive results.
In Alzheimer's, excess tau protein damages brain's GPS Researchers have linked excess tau protein in the brain to the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients. The findings, in mice, could lead to early diagnostic tests for Alzheimer's and point to treatments for this common and troubling symptom.
Why the lights don't dim when we blink Every few seconds, our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets. So why doesn't blinking plunge us into intermittent darkness and light? New research shows that the brain works extra hard to stabilize our vision despite our fluttering eyes.
Brain stimulation used like a scalpel to improve memory For the first time, scientists have found that non-invasive brain stimulation can be used like a scalpel to affect a specific improvement in precise memory. Precise memory, rather than general memory, is critical for knowing the building you are looking for has a specific color, shape and location, rather than simply knowing the part of town it's in. Precise memory is crucial for normal functioning, and it is often lost in people with memory disorders.