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Making Self-Care A Priority According to life coach, speaker and author Renée Peterson Trudeau in her book Nurturing the Soul of Your Family: 10 Ways to Reconnect and Find Peace in Everyday Life, self-care includes everything from silencing self-criticism to saying no to carving out downtime to not letting guilt drive your actions. She defines...
These Things Alone Are Your Concern The Western ethos historically runs from Mesopotamia: Sumerians were the first to cradle our existential blues in writing. King Gilgamesh went looking for heavenly immortality and found meaning in the day-to-day trivia of our earthly life: Gilgamesh, whither are you wandering? Life, which you look for, you will never find. For...
New form of treatment to reduce risk of surgery-related ischemic brain injury? Ischemic brain injury due to heart and vascular surgery causes more than 100,000 deaths annually in Europe and the United States. In addition, approximately 10–20% of patients undergoing heart and vascular surgery – at least 1.5 million people in Europe and the United States every year – suffer from ischemic brain injury as a side-effect of their surgery. Now researchers suggest that they may have come up with a new treatment to this problem.
Did You Choose to Have Fewer Friends? The results of 277 studies from around the world showed that after age 30, the number of friends in our social networks shrinks. Other social networks – except for family networks – tend to get smaller, too. That’s what I discussed previously. But what should we make of these findings?...
Best of Our Blogs: May 2, 2014 Being immersed in our culture of reality TV, self-help gurus and a plethora of parenting books, it’s difficult not to get steeped in shoulds. It’s not only the things I should say or do that get to me, but I rehash things in my mind about what I said or...
What Did I Just Say? I’ve confessed before that I talk to myself. I don’t rant, and I rarely argue with myself. It’s usually a pretty one sided and biased conversation. And I’ve mentioned how much I’m indebted to the age of ®Bluetooth Headsets. I mean, there was a time when people seeing me driving...
One Good Way to Test Your Significant Other. Last week’s cartoon,  which gives a warning about overdoing the happy face,  is here.  All rights reserved, and content including cartoons is © Donna Barstow 2014,  My own website is Donna Barstow Cartoons. I apologize that the caption is a little small. It reads: I was thinking of getting you...
Six Dating Rules You Should Stop Following When it comes to courting and dating, popular longstanding advice suggests that until the fish is on the hook, it is beneficial to adhere to certain "rules." These rules seem to offer a recipe for finding commitment and true romantic partnership, ...
In Praise of the Middle Adopter Should you be more of an early or late adopter?
Understanding BPD Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a mental illness marked by unstable moods, behavior and relationships.  People with BPD feel the same emotions other people do. They do many things that other people do. The difference is that they feel things intensely, act in extreme ways and have difficulty regulating their...
Researchers reveal new cause of epilepsy A team of researchers from SUNY Downstate Medical Center (SUNY Downstate) and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) has found that deficiencies in hyaluronan, also known as hyaluronic acid or HA, can lead to spontaneous epileptic seizures. HA is a polysaccharide molecule widely distributed throughout connective, epithelial, and neural tissues, including the brain’s extracellular space (ECS).
Delving deep into the brain: BRAIN Initiative to revolutionize our understanding of cognition Launched in 2013, the national BRAIN Initiative aims to revolutionize our understanding of cognition by mapping the activity of every neuron in the human brain, revealing how brain circuits interact to create memories, learn new skills, and interpret the world around us. Before that can happen, neuroscientists need new tools that will let them probe
Playing outside could make kids more spiritual Children who spend significant time outdoors could have a stronger sense of self-fulfillment and purpose than those who don’t, according to new Michigan State University research linking children’s experiences in nature with how they define spirituality. In the study, published recently in the Journal of the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture, children who played
The real difference between how men and women choose their partners A hamburger that’s 90 per cent fat-free sounds a lot better than one with 10 per cent fat. And even when the choices are the same, humans are hard-wired to prefer the more positive option. This is because of what’s known as the “framing effect,” a principle that new research from Concordia has proved applies
Casualties get scant attention in wartime news, with little change since World War I The human costs of America’s wars have received scant attention in daily war reporting – through five major conflicts going back a century – says an extensive and first-of-its-kind study of New York Times war coverage being published this month. It’s timely research given the major anniversaries this year for three of those conflicts.No matter
Can money buy happiness? For some, the answer is no Many shoppers, whether they buy material items or life experiences, are no happier following the purchase than they were before, according to a new study from San Francisco State University. Although previous research has shown experiences create greater happiness for buyers, the study suggests that certain material buyers — those who tend to purchase material
Researchers link age, health and antidepressant use with eye disorders Abnormal binocular vision, which involves the way eyes work together as a team, increases dramatically as we age, according to research from the University of Waterloo. The study also found a correlation between this condition, general health and antidepressant use. As many as 27 per cent of adults in their sixties have an actual binocular
Excessive regulations turning scientists into bureaucrats Excessive regulations are consuming scientists’ time and wasting taxpayer dollars, says a report released today by the National Science Board (NSB), the policymaking body of the National Science Foundation and advisor to Congress and the President. “Regulation and oversight of research are needed to ensure accountability, transparency and safety,” said Arthur Bienenstock, chair of the
Atypical form of Alzheimer’s disease may be present in a more widespread number of patients Neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida have defined a subtype of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that they say is neither well recognized nor treated appropriately. The variant, called hippocampal sparing AD, made up 11 percent of the 1,821 AD-confirmed brains examined by Mayo Clinic researchers — suggesting this subtype is relatively widespread in the general population.
Atypical form of Alzheimer's disease may be present in more widespread number of patients than thought A subtype of Alzheimer's disease has been identified by neuroscientists that they say is neither well recognized nor treated appropriately. The variant, called hippocampal sparing AD, made up 11 percent of the 1,821 AD-confirmed brains examined by researchers -- suggesting this subtype is relatively widespread in the general population. It is estimated that 5.2 million Americans are living with AD. And with nearly half of hippocampal sparing AD patients being misdiagnosed, this could mean that well over 600,000 Americans make up this AD variant, researchers say.