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In recognizing speech sounds, the brain does not work the way a computer does How does the brain decide whether or not something is correct? When it comes to the processing of spoken language – particularly whether or not certain sound combinations are allowed in a language – the common theory has been that the brain applies a set of rules to determine whether combinations are permissible. Now the
Study calls for U.S. to significantly reduce the rate of incarceration Given the minimal impact of long prison sentences on crime prevention and the negative social consequences and burdensome financial costs of U.S. incarceration rates, which have more than quadrupled in the last four decades, the nation should revise current criminal justice policies to significantly reduce imprisonment rates, says a new report from the National Research Council. A
Merely observing stressful situations can trigger a physical stress response Stress is contagious. Observing another person in a stressful situation can be enough to make our own bodies release the stress hormone cortisol. This is the conclusion reached by scientists involved in a large-scale cooperation project between the departments of Tania Singer at the Max Planck Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and
Yoga can help keep expectant mothers stress free: First evidence found The effects of yoga on pregnant women has been studied, with results showing that it can reduce the risk of anxiety and depression. Stress during pregnancy has been linked to premature birth, low birth weight and increased developmental and behavioral problems in the child as a toddler and adolescent, as well as later mental health problems in the mother. A high level of anxiety during pregnancy is linked with postnatal depression which in turn is associated with increased risk of developing depression later in life.
Stem cells from teeth can make brain-like cells Researchers have discovered that stem cells taken from teeth can grow to resemble brain cells, suggesting they could one day be used in the brain as a therapy for stroke.
# 91 Buckets of Tears Shandi-lee Cox via Compfight We all cried buckets of tears that summer. After three weeks of training, Matt was flown to New York’s La Guardia Airport for the next leg of his journey to Germany. We decided to meet him there for one last good-bye. It must have been quite...
A Tale of Two Defiers Shelley, a college sophomore, is an actively aggressive defier. She prides herself on being a fiercely independent person who doesn’t need or want anyone to tell her what to do. She often resorts to fighting words in her verbal outbursts: – “How could he give me such a crappy grade?”...
With No Formal Diagnosis or Treatment Plans, How Can After more than twenty years spent treating, speaking about, and writing about sexual addiction, I’ve heard all the arguments (and then some) both in favor of and against utilizing an addiction-focused model of diagnosis and treatment to identify and help individuals who self-report repetitive, problematic patterns of impulsive and/or compulsive...
Why Do Some People Get PTSD and Others Don’t?   Trauma is complicated.  Not everyone who experiences a traumatic event has post-traumatic stress symptoms and many people who have symptoms see a natural decrease in those symptoms while others wind up with post-traumatic stress disorder.  Still others see other symptoms that are bit different and get other diagnoses.  Why?...
Meditation Part III: How Meditation Can Heal Most people would agree that meditation is beneficial to one’s health, which is part of the allure that has kept it around for so many years. But did you ever stop to think exactly why meditation was healthy or how it affected your health? Meditation creates a state of relaxation;...
Fast-acting antidepressant appears within reach In mice, a drug produces evidence of a mood lift within 24 hours and then continues working for sustained depression relief. A fast-acting antidepressant would be a welcome development for patients who must wait weeks for current drugs to take effect.
The Overly Anxious Child “Worry is the thin stream of fear trickling through the mind. If encouraged it cuts a channel into which all other thoughts are drained.” ~ Arthur Somers Roche. Many adults wonder what children have to worry about. After all, they have all their basic needs met by others in the...
Brain, cognitive reserve protect long-term against cognitive decline, MS researchers find MS researchers have found brain reserve and cognitive reserve confer long-term protective effect against cognitive decline. In this study, memory, cognitive efficiency, vocabulary (a measure of intellectual enrichment/cognitive reserve), brain volume (a measure of brain reserve), and disease progression on MRI, were evaluated in 40 patients with MS at baseline and at 4.5-year followup. After controlling for disease progression, scientists looked at the impact of brain volume and intellectual enrichment on cognitive decline.
My Crooked Path Toward Perfection When I returned to piano lessons as an adult, I never dreamed how much I would learn about myself.
MRI-guided biopsy for brain cancer improves diagnosis Neurosurgeons have, for the first time, combined real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology with novel non-invasive cellular mapping techniques to develop a new biopsy approach that increases the accuracy of diagnosis for patients with brain cancer. As many as one third of brain tumor biopsies performed in the traditional manner can result in misdiagnosis.
Avoid These 3 Mistakes When Going Through a Transition Life is full of 180-degree turns. Just when we think we have things figured out, life throws us for a loop with both “good” things and “bad.” Falling in love turns our world around. Having children, moving to a new place, getting married, getting divorced, getting a new job, retirement,...
A Conscious Re-Writing of Your Life Story: Three Optimal The authentic wise-self and the wounded ego-self are often at odds with each other. Some competition between them is natural, in vying over which lense, love or fear, will be the primary voice of your experience of life. It’s an ongoing aspect of personal growth and development. As discussed in Part 1, each...
A Conscious Re-Writing of Your Life Story: 3 Optimal The authentic wise-self and the wounded ego-self are often at odds with each other. . Some competition between them is natural, in vying over which lense, love or fear, will be the primary voice of your experience of life. It’s an ongoing aspect of personal growth and development. As discussed in Part 1,...
5 Reasons We Struggle to be “Trauma Responsive” – I listened to her. She was young, an overnight worker in a congregate care facility.  She was in anguish, her voice tight with pain, as she described seeing another worker taser a youth who was upset, and then high-five a co-worker and say “Got another one!”  How could her organization...
Your stress is my stress: Observing stress can trigger physical stress response Merely observing stressful situations can trigger a physical stress response, research shows. Stress is a major health threat in today's society. It causes a range of psychological problems like burnout, depression and anxiety. Even those who lead relatively relaxed lives constantly come into contact with stressed individuals. Whether at work or on television: someone is always experiencing stress, and this stress can affect the general environment in a physiologically quantifiable way through increased concentrations of the stress hormone cortisol.