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Vanderbilt study explores genetics behind Alzheimer’s resiliency Autopsies have revealed that some individuals develop the cellular changes indicative of Alzheimer’s disease without ever showing clinical symptoms in their lifetime. Vanderbilt University Medical Center memory researchers have discovered a potential genetic variant in these asymptomatic individuals that may make brains more resilient against Alzheimer’s. “Most Alzheimer’s research is searching for genes that predict
ABC’s “Black Box” – Take Two So, I am a bit late to the dance, but I just finished watching last night’s Black Box on ABC. (Forgive me for the delay – my beautifully bipolar life happened). I found this episode So. Much. Better. More believable. More identifiable. First off with the things I hated: 1....
8 Reasons Why Kindness Should Be Taught in Schools Most people have heard the phrase “random acts of kindness,” which refers to a selfless act of giving resulting in another’s happiness. Terms like this are increasing in popularity around the world, as more people identify a deficiency in their lives that can only be fulfilled by altruism. It seems we just...
Scientists reveal circuitry of fundamental motor circuit The developmental source for a key type of neuron that allows animals to walk, a finding that could help pave the way for new therapies for spinal cord injuries or other motor impairments related to disease. The spinal cord contains a network of neurons that are able to operate largely in an autonomous manner, thus allowing animals to carry out simple rhythmic walking movements with minimal attention—giving us the ability, for example, to walk while talking on the phone. These circuits control properties such as stepping with each foot or pacing the tempo of walking or running.
My Mother’s Secret, My Secret One time, when I was a young mother, afraid that my love was not enough for my two sons, my mother shared a secret with me. This was, by far, the bravest thing that I have ever witnessed her doing.
Spike activity 02-05-2014 Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: All the amazing Dwayne Goodwin and Jorge Cham brain comics are collated in this one fantastic tumblr. Not Exactly Rocket Science covers a fascinating study on how randomly distributed initial benefits can lead to long-term gains. You Neanderthal! Why thank you madam. New Scientist […]
There is Only One Good Way to Rewrite History There are certain things you shouldn’t do when you’re depressed, like watching sad stuff on TV. I try to avoid that sort of thing as much as possible. Actually, I’ve decided that watching a few reruns of “The Golden Girls” is great therapy for those down days. The other day...
Seeing Things: The Confounding, Terrifying Nature of Scintillating Scotoma I see dead people. And for a moment I think they’re alive. Until I realize they’re just a paperclip. I see things. Things that aren’t there. I misinterpret things. Things that are there. There’s the time I saw a flash of light outside the cab I was riding in, and...
In Relationships, Understanding—Not Agreement—Is Key, Why? In employing the term “understanding” here, I’m not referring to some impersonal, objective comprehension of your partner's viewpoint. Rather, it’s used to signify an empathic, open-hearted appreciation of where they're coming from. And such a humane understanding can make all the difference in your relationship, regardless of how much you actually agree with each other.
Berlin Hallucinations Talk, Thursday 8th May I’m going to be doing a public talk on the science of hallucinations in Berlin next week. This thoroughly awesome poster has been made for the event. A big tip of the hat to illustrator Eoin Ryan for that one. The talk will take place in the Villa Neukölln bar, is part of the Big […]
An Off-ADHD-Meds Update Vicente Villamón via Compfight I’ve been off ADHD stimulant medication since about March 17. I must have the luck ‘o the Irish because (with the notable exception of the owl incident) I think things are going pretty well. Some of you have expressed an interest in my progress (or lack...
Are BPD "Drama Queens" Manipulative, Sadistic, and Worse? Having to interact with someone with a borderline personality disorder can be extremely maddening—for both sides. High intensity emotions are costly. They make interactions stressfully upsetting, emotionally draining, and demoralizing.
Are BPD 'Drama Queens' Manipulative, Sadistic, and Worse? Having to interact with someone with a borderline personality disorder can be extremely maddening--for both sides. High intensity emotions are costly. They make interactions stressfully upsetting, emotionally draining, and demoralizing.
Key protein enhances memory, learning A protein previously implicated in disease plays such a positive role in learning and memory that it may someday contribute to cures of cognitive impairments, researchers have discovered. The findings regarding the potential virtues of fatty acid binding protein 5 -- usually associated with cancer and psoriasis -- have been outlined in a new article.
Overcoming “Impossible” Odds Imagine what your life would be like if all of the things that most of us take for granted were not there. Things like food, a functional bathroom, clean clothes, privacy, adequate heat in the cold of winter, a sense of physical and emotional security, and other ingredients that most...
Work-Life Balance: Striving and Savoring If life was like a cooking recipe, it would be easy to know the exact formula to create that optimal state we all aspire to. Considering it is nothing like that though, we constantly find ourselves (without a cheat sheet) facing difficult choices that sometimes stand on opposite ends of...
Is Taking Adderall to Boost College Brain Performance Cheating? A new study that will be presented tomorrow finds that 33 percent of students surveyed for a study at an Ivy League college said they did not think taking an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug, like Adderall or Ritalin, is a form of cheating. Another 25 percent weren’t sure...
How to Set Goals That Lead to Happiness People are wrong about the type of goals that will make them happiest.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Why You Should Keep Your Goals Secret How to Avoid Being Distracted From Your Goals 4 Dark Sides To The Pursuit of Happiness Our Genes Respond Positively to The Right Kind of Happiness How To Set Better Goals: Avoid Four Common Mistakes
Making Self-Care A Priority According to life coach, speaker and author Renée Peterson Trudeau in her book Nurturing the Soul of Your Family: 10 Ways to Reconnect and Find Peace in Everyday Life, self-care includes everything from silencing self-criticism to saying no to carving out downtime to not letting guilt drive your actions. She defines...
These Things Alone Are Your Concern The Western ethos historically runs from Mesopotamia: Sumerians were the first to cradle our existential blues in writing. King Gilgamesh went looking for heavenly immortality and found meaning in the day-to-day trivia of our earthly life: Gilgamesh, whither are you wandering? Life, which you look for, you will never find. For...