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Why We Need All the Acquaintances We Can Get Do acquaintances contribute to our happiness and well-being? More than you might think.
A Journaling Prompt for Your Body Image This morning on Twitter, Rosie posted an excerpt from a paper written by a student in her body image class: “My body is… my vehicle to accomplish the things my mind and heart desire to do.” This is such a powerful reminder. And I think it makes for a great...
Why is MS more common in women? Study explains why A newly identified difference between the brains of women and men with multiple sclerosis (MS) may help explain why so many more women than men get the disease, researchers report. In recent years, the diagnosis of MS has increased more rapidly among women, who get the disorder nearly four times more than men. The reasons are unclear, but the new study is the first to associate a sex difference in the brain with MS.
Taking Class Notes on Your Laptop? Think Again Last year, I wrote about how certain study techniques are more effective than others. Surprising, a lot of study techniques that students routinely engage in aren’t all that helpful to memorizing and learning material (such as highlighting or underlining text, or re-reading it). Two researchers recently expanded upon this research...
How to Evaluate Character: A New Approach Everyone has a certain set of character strengths. It is how we use those strengths that will determine our success.
How to Make Friends with the Grey I’m not too fond of the term “control freak.” First of all, it doesn’t sound flattering. It also doesn’t sound like anything I’d want to use to introduce myself to new people – “Hi, I’m Shannon and I’m a control freak.” I doubt I’d make many (any) new friends. Plus,...
Elevating Brain Fluid Pressure Could Prevent Vision Loss Scientists have found that pressure from the fluid surrounding the brain plays a role in maintaining proper eye function, opening a new direction for treating glaucoma — the second leading cause of blindness worldwide.
Attending a Better University Doesn’t Make You Happier, Here’s What Does… Only 14% of graduates strongly agreed that the professors cared about them.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:10 Ways To Be Happier at Work 10 Easy Activities Science Has Proven Will Make You Happier Today People Are Happier When They Do The Right Thing 10 Simple Habits Proven to Make You Happier The Psychology of Motivation Explained (in under 300 words)
Challenging the "Banality" of Evil and of Heroism Part 2 Situationism implies that evil-doers are victims of circumstances beyond their control, yet argues that heroes are those who can rise above their circumstances to do what is right. An ideology of victimisation is incompatible with heroism. Personal responsibility for one's actions cuts both ways.
Semantic Path to Nonduality Nonduality is a hard concept to grasp.  It’s because it is not exactly a concept – it’s what you get when you transcend the concepts.  Confusing as the path may be, it is a path to a certain kind of clarity, to a certain kind of liberation.  So, here’s a...
Mouse study offers new clues to cognitive decline Certain types of brain cells may be “picky eaters,” seeming to prefer one specific energy source over others, new research shows. The finding has implications for understanding the cognitive decline seen in aging and degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis. Studying mice, the scientists showed that a specific energy source called NAD is important in cells responsible for maintaining the overall structure of the brain and for performing complex cognitive functions. NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) is a molecule that harvests energy from nutrients in food and converts it into a form cells can use.
The Effect Being Called ‘Fat’ Has on 10-Year-Old Girls, 9 Years Later Are girls shocked into changing their lifestyle, or is the result altogether darker?→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Girls Get Higher Grades Than Boys In All Subjects Antidepressants: Higher Rates of Psychological Side-Effects Revealed by New Study Irregular Bedtimes Reduce Children’s Cognitive Performance The Positive Effect of Creative Hobbies on Performance at Work The Best Computer Now Smart as a 4-Year-Old (Sort of)
Should A Cheater Be Forgiven? I admit it: I’m hooked on “True Tori”, the reality show following Tori Spelling and her husband Dean McDermott, who confessed to a two-day affair (after Tori got the heads-up that the tabloids were about to run the story.)  A recent study says that the key element in whether a...
5 Ways to Stop a Worry-Filled What-If Cycle What-if thoughts aren’t necessarily problematic. They become problematic when they’re chronic, and we experience a lack of control, said L. Kevin Chapman, Ph.D. Chapman is a psychologist and associate professor in clinical psychology at the University of Louisville, where he studies and treats anxiety disorders. What-if thoughts also become problematic...
Reducing Procrastination By Addressing The Role of Anxiety Most of us procrastinate about doing some things, some of the time. I may put off folding clothes and you may find yourself avoiding the mail, the boxes in the garage or the report due next week.  For 20% of men and women in the US, procrastination becomes a pervasive...
The Rise of Artisan Parenting Artisan parents create a handcrafted, "authentic", high parental-effort childhood for their kids to demonstrate that they are better parents.
Help! I Don't Understand My Assignment! Cynthia writes: "My psychology teacher has told us to write a paper, but I don't understand the topic or what she wants us to write about. I'm so confused and I'm scared that I'll mess up and get a bad grade! What should I do? Can you explain this assignment to me?"...Read Full Post
Collaboration Between Psychologists and Physicians Important to Improving Primary Health Care Such partnering would improve diagnosis and access; two known barriers to better primary care outcomes
Early fitness can improve the middle-age brain The more physically active you are at age 25, the better your thinking tends to be when you reach middle age, according to a large-scale new study.
Medications cut violence among mentally ill Mentally ill people are substantially less likely to commit a violent crime if they are taking psychiatric medication, according to a large new study of the mentally ill in Sweden.