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Army drug users twice as likely to use synthetic marijuana as regular marijuana Social work researchers from the University of Washington have found that among a group of active-duty Army personnel who use illicit drugs, the most abused substance is synthetic marijuana, which is harder to detect than other drugs through standard drug tests. The research will be published in the July 2014 issue of Addictive Behaviors, but is already
Cutting National Healthcare Costs Through Broader Mental Wellness Access In 2010, over 6.4 million emergency room visits involved treatment for mental health conditions or substance abuse. That number is up 28 percent from just four years earlier. Though many of these cases may be due to serious illnesses or related injuries, too many are preventable with ongoing mental wellness...
Gaslighting: How Addicts Drive Loved Ones Over the Edge What Is Gaslighting? Gaslighting is a form of psychological abuse where false information is presented to the victim by a spouse or another primary attachment figure, causing the victim to doubt his or her perceptions, judgments, memories, and even sanity. The term derives from the 1938 stage play, Gaslight, and...
5 Steps to Transition from Rescuer to Helper There are some people in the world who are wired to be ‘rescuers’. They see injustice, illness and pain and want to help people who are struggling. Ideally they desire to ‘save’ others and erase all conflict. Rescuers play an important function in society. They are the voices of the silenced and the stigmatised, and […]
5 Sober Ways to Celebrate Your Recovery Weddings, birthdays, anniversaries and graduations are widely celebrated, sometimes in grand fashion. We make a big fuss over getting a driver’s license at 16 and aging in to the right to drink alcohol at 21. But these aren’t the only, or necessarily the most important, occasions worthy of observance. After...
10 Simple Ways to Beat the Blues There are some days you just feel down. Sometimes you know why: a fight with a friend or spouse, financial troubles, difficulty with your kids. Other times a low mood can come out of nowhere. But however or whenever these blue days come, it can make the entire day seem...
Justifying late-term abortions: Mother’s mental health is not enough Last week Florida lawmakers passed a law banning most abortions during the third-trimester. A doctor who performs an abortion during the third trimester and anyone who assists can be charged with the third-degree felony. However, the law makes an exception when a “physician certifies in writing that, in reasonable medical...
Tackling test anxiety may help prevent more severe problems Showing students how to cope with test anxiety might also help them to handle their built-up angst and fretfulness about other issues. The results of a new study show that anxiety intervention programs that focus on academic matters fit well into the demands of the school routine, and do not carry the same stigma among youth as general anxiety programs do.
Why We Need All the Acquaintances We Can Get Do acquaintances contribute to our happiness and well-being? More than you might think.
A Journaling Prompt for Your Body Image This morning on Twitter, Rosie posted an excerpt from a paper written by a student in her body image class: “My body is… my vehicle to accomplish the things my mind and heart desire to do.” This is such a powerful reminder. And I think it makes for a great...
Why is MS more common in women? Study explains why A newly identified difference between the brains of women and men with multiple sclerosis (MS) may help explain why so many more women than men get the disease, researchers report. In recent years, the diagnosis of MS has increased more rapidly among women, who get the disorder nearly four times more than men. The reasons are unclear, but the new study is the first to associate a sex difference in the brain with MS.
Taking Class Notes on Your Laptop? Think Again Last year, I wrote about how certain study techniques are more effective than others. Surprising, a lot of study techniques that students routinely engage in aren’t all that helpful to memorizing and learning material (such as highlighting or underlining text, or re-reading it). Two researchers recently expanded upon this research...
How to Evaluate Character: A New Approach Everyone has a certain set of character strengths. It is how we use those strengths that will determine our success.
How to Make Friends with the Grey I’m not too fond of the term “control freak.” First of all, it doesn’t sound flattering. It also doesn’t sound like anything I’d want to use to introduce myself to new people – “Hi, I’m Shannon and I’m a control freak.” I doubt I’d make many (any) new friends. Plus,...
Elevating Brain Fluid Pressure Could Prevent Vision Loss Scientists have found that pressure from the fluid surrounding the brain plays a role in maintaining proper eye function, opening a new direction for treating glaucoma — the second leading cause of blindness worldwide.
Attending a Better University Doesn’t Make You Happier, Here’s What Does… Only 14% of graduates strongly agreed that the professors cared about them.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:10 Ways To Be Happier at Work 10 Easy Activities Science Has Proven Will Make You Happier Today People Are Happier When They Do The Right Thing 10 Simple Habits Proven to Make You Happier The Psychology of Motivation Explained (in under 300 words)
Challenging the "Banality" of Evil and of Heroism Part 2 Situationism implies that evil-doers are victims of circumstances beyond their control, yet argues that heroes are those who can rise above their circumstances to do what is right. An ideology of victimisation is incompatible with heroism. Personal responsibility for one's actions cuts both ways.
Semantic Path to Nonduality Nonduality is a hard concept to grasp.  It’s because it is not exactly a concept – it’s what you get when you transcend the concepts.  Confusing as the path may be, it is a path to a certain kind of clarity, to a certain kind of liberation.  So, here’s a...
Mouse study offers new clues to cognitive decline Certain types of brain cells may be “picky eaters,” seeming to prefer one specific energy source over others, new research shows. The finding has implications for understanding the cognitive decline seen in aging and degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis. Studying mice, the scientists showed that a specific energy source called NAD is important in cells responsible for maintaining the overall structure of the brain and for performing complex cognitive functions. NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) is a molecule that harvests energy from nutrients in food and converts it into a form cells can use.
The Effect Being Called ‘Fat’ Has on 10-Year-Old Girls, 9 Years Later Are girls shocked into changing their lifestyle, or is the result altogether darker?→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Girls Get Higher Grades Than Boys In All Subjects Antidepressants: Higher Rates of Psychological Side-Effects Revealed by New Study Irregular Bedtimes Reduce Children’s Cognitive Performance The Positive Effect of Creative Hobbies on Performance at Work The Best Computer Now Smart as a 4-Year-Old (Sort of)