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Researchers identify changes that may occur in neural circuits due to addiction A research team from the Friedman Brain Institute of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has published evidence that shows that subtle changes of inhibitory signaling in the reward pathway can change how animals respond to drugs such as cocaine. This is the first study to demonstrate the critical links between the levels
Driving while pregnant is riskier than you might think The risk is the greatest during the second trimester, when a woman's chance for getting into an accident is about the same as someone with sleep apnea.
Exercising the mind to treat attention deficits Research shows that strengthening cognitive control, usually with exercises in mindfulness, may help children and adults cope with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and attention deficit disorder.
Bullying linked to increased inflammation According to a new study, the physical consequences of being bullied might be explained by an increase in low-grade inflammation throughout the body.
Rams draft pick could impact Missouri law Many in Missouri are hopeful The choice of Michael Sam will lead to law changes regarding those who are openly gay, lesbian, and bisexual.
Study finds LSD reverses the deficiency in avoidance learning in impaired rats New research suggests that LSD — known as the psychedelic drug “acid” — has antidepressant effects that appear to be linked to the serotonergic system in the brain. Recent research has found that LSD can reduce the anxiety associated with life-threatening diseases such as cancer. But scientists are still relatively ignorant about the effects of
UK troops face 'growing mental health cost' of Afghan war There has been a "significant increase" in the number of UK veterans of the Afghanistan conflict seeking mental health treatment.
ADHD drugs not linked to increased tobacco use Studies find that adolescents who take stimulant medications to treat ADHD are less likely to smoke than those with ADHD who are not treated with the drugs.
Stressed Out: How Stress Affects Our Physical and Mental As a part of Mental Health Month’s “Mind Your Health” theme for 2014, today, we will discuss stress, the body, and mental health. Keirsten Marie via Compfight I am a high-stress individual. If my day, and the people around me, are calm, cool, and collected, I am okay too. However,...
#94 Negotiating Personal Space   Jonathan Kos-Read via Compfight Creative writing proved to be an effective medium in which Dan could express the issues of his leave-taking. Dan had always struggled to negotiate a space between his need to be alone and his desire to be with the people he loved. He attended the...
The Power of the Written Word: Healing Through Journal-Writing At the age of 18, I was sexually molested and exploited by my coach’s husband. This was a very traumatic situation in my life, and I was faced with having to deal with the pain even after being taken out of the situation. Once I came back home to my...
How I Turned My Miserable Life Around I used to wake up every day with a sickening chant going off in my mind. I hate my life. I hate my life! I hate my life…! This went on for years. And it was true. I hated my life. Still, I didn’t like being reminded of this fact...
Alternative pathways let right and left communicate in early split brains Humans who lack the corpus callosum, a bundle of 200 million fibers that connect the left and right hemispheres of the brain, have long fascinated physicians, neuroscientists and other curious minds. Now, a group of researchers puts an end to the Sperry's paradox, which describes major differences between individuals born with reduced or absent brain connections and those who acquire this condition later in life.
Bullying may have long-term health consequences Bullied children may experience chronic, systemic inflammation that persists into adulthood, while bullies may actually reap health benefits of increasing their social status through bullying, according to researchers.
Master of Soul: An Interview With Thomas Moore The renegade author of "Care of the Soul" talks about getting real about spiritual life, forgetting about closure, and cultivating a path of authenticity.
Responding to “Borderline” Provocations Part VI Being in a relationship, by blood or romance, with someone with traits of borderline personality disorder is incredibly challenging. While they may seem at times to be irrational, there is in fact a method to their madness. In Part VI of this series, I recommend countermeasures for when they seem to be making illogical statements or absurd arguments.
Falling out of Love is Simply Awful Nearly all of us know the feeling — the blissful first days of new love. We get swept away with the emotional highs, exhilarating new experiences and stomach-tingling thrill of falling head over heels for someone new. It’s an amazing experience and can happen oh so fast. To fall in...
This Could Be The Surprising Answer To The “What’s Hint: It’s not just for kids. Stuart Brown is a man on a mission. He is convinced that there is something missing in many of our lives, the absence of which is a source of much suffering and unhappiness. It is the lack of this element that is the source...
How Does "Valence" Help Your Brain Distinguish Between Good And Bad? Have you ever had anyone tell you that they feel the "good kind of tired" while you are feeling the much-more-common bad kind of tired? How do you experience having a good appetite versus just being hungry? To put in scientific terms, how do we judge valence? ...
Unfettered: The Quest for Solitude and Wide Open Spaces I started driving off into the desert and wanted to just keep on going, away from everyone and everything. Last year I blogged about this experience and found that many readers resonated with this desire to escape. A few weeks ago I had a chance to take another drive into the desert. I looked back: Had I been able to follow my own recommendations from that earlier entry?