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Researchers discover how DHA omega-3 fatty acid reaches brain The transporter protein Mfsd2a carries DHA to the brain, research has found. The findings have widespread implications for how DHA functions in human nutrition. The study marks the first time a genetic model for brain DHA deficiency and its functions in the brain has been made available. DHA is an omega-3 fatty acid most abundantly found in the brain that is thought to be crucial to its function. However, the brain does not produce DHA. Instead, DHA uptake in the brain happens in two ways. The developing brain receives DHA during fetal development, from a mother to her baby. The adult brain gets it through food or DHA produced by the liver.
Research Suggests You Retire the Selfie, Literally Help your future self to more savings by connecting it with your present self. Or was that the other way around? It's not a temporal paradox, it's behavioral economics.
Retire the Selfie Help your future self to more savings by connecting it with your present self. Or was that the other way around? It's not a temporal paradox, it's behavioral economics.
Are Women Evil? Women Hating On Other Women Women hating on other women: I hate this topic. It really bugs me when people talk about how mean other women are to each other. I don’t even like writing about it, but it is has been on my radar lately and the subject keeps coming up. For example, Gwyneth Paltrow...
On Rejecting the False Promise, 25 Years Later I used to think once you put down the drink you were fixed, that once you conjured up the courage to quit your addiction the hard work was over. But addicts are never really cured. Like cancer survivors, they simply stay in remission for the duration of their lives. There...
How Heroic Are You? Heroes share five common personality traits: They are open to new experiences, conscientious, extroverted, warm and caring, and emotionally stable.
Do You Have the Personality of a Hero? Heroes share five common personality traits: They are open to new experiences, conscientious, extroverted, warm and caring, and emotionally stable.
How Easily Stress is Transferred Between People Men and women both showed equivalent empathy despite the stereotype.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Empathy: Women Better Under Stress But Men Worse Rethinking The Stress Mindset: Can You Find The Upside of Pressure? Perform Better Under Stress Using Self-Affirmation Childhood Poverty and Stress Harms Adult Brain Function Chronic Stress Early in Life Causes Anxiety and Aggression in Adulthood
Three Steps to Emotionally Supporting Your Partner Have you ever attempted to be helpful to a partner only to have your input rejected? Some of the time the rejection we experience is overt and direct. At other times it is more covert and subtle. Our partner may smile and say “what a great idea!” but their body...
Forgive Yourself, Save Your Relationship Despite our best intentions to treat romantic partners with respect and kindness, we sometimes slip up and do things that hurt them. We might make a rude comment, show up late for an important event, fail to follow through on a promise—or even lie and cheat. These transgressions can make us feel ashamed and disappointed in ourselves, and they should—without experiencing negative emotions as a result of hurting someone, we are unlikely to be motivated to make amends and improve our behavior. But research suggests that excessively punishing ourselves for our mistakes can do more harm than good, leading us to feel hopeless and paralyzed by self-doubt. One way to protect oneself against excessive self-punishment following a transgression is to engage in a process of self-forgiveness. Self-forgiveness involves gradually letting go of negative self-directed feelings and at the same time gradually restoring positive feelings like self-respect and self-compassion. Critically, self-forgiveness is only relevant when a person has already accepted responsibility for a transgression; without this element it is called “pseudo self-forgiveness.” Research suggests that self-forgiveness is associated with a number of psychological benefits, including lower anxiety and depression, and better physical health.  But how does self-forgiveness affect other people? Can forgiving yourself help your partner and improve your relationship as a whole? Researchers have only recently begun to address these questions, but the initial evidence suggests that genuine self-forgiveness may indeed benefit relationships, with a few caveats. Here’s how: 1. Self-forgiveness may increase relationship satisfaction—for both partners. In a recent study of long-term relationship partners, both members of the couple were asked to recall a transgression they committed against their partner for which their partner remembered being hurt. They were also asked to report on two dimensions of self-forgiveness: negative feelings toward the self (e.g., self-criticism, holding a grudge) and positive feelings toward the self (e.g., understanding, compassion). For offending partners, both aspects of self-forgiveness—less negativity and more positivity—contributed to relationship satisfaction. For offended partners, however, only less negativity contributed: that is, they were more satisfied with their relationship to the extent that their partner had let go of negative feelings about his or her offense, but the presence of positive feelings didn’t make a difference. The researchers interpreted this finding as suggesting that partners who hold on to shame and self-criticism long after a transgression has occurred may also be more difficult partners to live with, demanding more reassurance and support and giving less. This pattern is supported by research showing that the more offenders ruminate about their transgressions, the less motivated they are to apologize and seek reconciliation. The positive aspects of self-forgiveness may have made less of an impression simply because, psychologically speaking, bad is stronger than good. Two key factors that were not examined in this study but might be playing a role is whether the offending partner apologized and tried to make amends, and whether the offended partner offered forgiveness. Self-forgiveness may be more likely to contribute to relationship satisfaction if it is accompanied by these behaviors. 2. Self-forgiveness may decrease the likelihood of repeat offenses. A key question in both forgiveness and self-forgiveness research is whether these practices actually decrease problematic behavior, an outcome that has direct consequences for a romantic partner. In one study, participants who had been forgiven for a transgression reported greater “repentance motivation” than participants who had not been forgiven. Repentance motivation involved wanting to preserve or mend the relationship, wanting to treat the person better, wanting to do everything possible to avoid repeating the offense, and wanting to do something positive to make up for the offense. Receiving forgiveness may help people feel a greater sense of hope for the relationship and therefore greater motivation to work on it, whereas a lack of forgiveness might make people feel that their efforts will be in vain. In addition, receiving an act of goodwill (i.e., forgiveness) may make people motivated to reciprocate (i.e., treat the other person better). Does self-forgiveness work the same way? One study found that a brief self-forgiveness induction aimed at helping participants release guilt and self-punishing feelings regarding a recalled transgression did not increase the odds that they would engage in reparative behaviors such as apology and offering restitution over the next two weeks. The researchers concluded that self-forgiveness should perhaps not be encouraged until after reparative efforts are made. In fact, their results showed that participants who had already apologized or made amends before the study started were most likely to increase in self-forgiveness during the study—perhaps because they felt more deserving of it. In contrast, an experimental study I conducted with Serena Chen found that participants who were randomly assigned to approach a recent transgression with self-compassion, a practice related to self-forgiveness but broader in scope, experienced greater self-improvement motivation (e.g., desire to apologize, make amends, and avoid repeating the transgression) than participants in self-esteem or distraction conditions. Similarly, in another set of studies, genuine self-forgiveness—which focuses on the process of working through a transgression and trying to accept the self while still acknowledging wrongdoing (as opposed to simply replacing negative emotions with positive ones)—predicted greater empathy for the offended partner and greater desire to make things right and improve the relationship. The researchers argued that genuine self-forgiveness can increase a person’s trust in themselves and belief that they can become “effective moral agents,” whereas excessive self-punishment can lead people to lose faith in themselves. This idea is supported by our own research. In a subsequent study, we found that affirming values violated by an offense restored moral identity, which led participants to experience greater self-forgiveness—as well as, over time, greater self-trust and desire for reconciliation. They also found that shame was not incompatible with these positive changes and may in fact be an essential component of interpersonal restoration. None of these three sets of studies examined romantic relationships specifically, and the link between self-forgiveness and reparation may take a different form when it comes to those bonds. For example, self-forgiveness may be more likely lead to better behavior if it is paired with forgiveness from the partner, or at least an openness to potentially forgive. In addition, people may feel a greater sense of interdependence and self-other overlap with long-term romantic partners than they do with other relationship partners, making their partner’s transgressions a mutual source of shame; in that sense, the offending partner’s self-forgiveness could potentially also help to reduce the offended partner’s negative feelings. Taken as a whole, these recent findings on self-forgiveness seem to suggest that our best bet following a transgression may be to focus our energy on extending compassion and care to the person we hurt. Whether we are condemning or elevating ourselves, we are focused on ourselves, not on our partners. When we focus on our partners instead, we may find that self-forgiveness arises naturally over time.
First Thought Photo: Lifeguard OFF Duty This post is part of the Your Body, Your Mind “First Thought Photo” series. The point of the series is simple: share your first thought upon seeing this photo. Of course, the rules are flexible Share your second, third, and fourth thoughts, too, if you want! Whether it be a...
Ignorance is Innocence There are many conceptual, interpretive, philosophical paths to forgiveness. Here’s one that might have not occurred to you yet. I consider this one a kind of axiom of forgiveness: “Ignorance is innocence and innocence is ignorance.” Give this some thought. See what this idea does for you. - 360 Degrees...
6 Strategies That Surprisingly Don’t Shrink Stress When we’re upset or overwhelmed, we may inadvertently turn to activities or habits that can spike our stress, not soothe it. Below, two experts reveal what doesn’t reduce stress and why — and what really does. Watching TV “Many of us — myself included — tend to unwind after a long...
Top Of My List Have I mentioned my love/hate relationship with lists before? Yes, looking back I see I have. Oh dear, I’ve discussed lists rather often I see. Sadly, lists is the next item on my list of blog post topics. And I can’t go against the list. Or can I? At the...
In Praise of Serious People Serious people deserve more of our time
A forest of porous dreaming A fascinating section of the book How Forests Think by anthropologist Eduardo Kohn where he describes how dreaming is much more porous among the Runa people of Ecuador. This is both because of how they understand dreams, but also because of the way sleep happens in their culture – it being a more social and […]
Coping With The Explosive Personality Last week I spoke about histrionic personality disorder and how this personality disorder negatively influences almost everyone in this person’s life. The effects of living with a rageful, angry, selfish, and domineering person can be great. The emotional, psychological, and physiological effects can also be great. Understanding how to cope...
Introducing Diary of a Therapist Even amongst people with a mental health issue or a mental illness, there remains discrimination. Women and many other minorities suffer from additional hurdles when seeking treatment, or when asserting their rights in treatment. Television often portrays minorities — and minority women especially — in a certain light that’s all...
Role of calcium in familial Alzheimer's disease clarified, pointing to new therapeutics Mutations in two presenilin proteins associated with familial Alzheimer's disease disrupt the flow of calcium ions within neurons. Researchers have found that suppressing the hyperactivity of the calcium channels alleviated FAD-like symptoms in mice models of the disease. These new observations suggest that approaches based on modulating calcium signaling could be explored for new AD therapies.
Lost Your Keys … Again!? 8 Tips for Finding Samuel Johnson wrote, “It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery, and as much happiness as possible,” and I’m often struck by how much happiness I get from making improvements in small, seemingly trivial aspects of my life. And one of...