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Rhythmic bursts of electrical activity from cells in ear teach brain how to hear A precise rhythm of electrical impulses transmitted from cells in the inner ear coaches the brain how to hear, according to a new study. The ear generates spontaneous electrical activity to trigger a response in the brain before hearing actually begins, said the study's senior investigator.
How touch can trigger our emotions While touch always involves awareness, it also sometimes involves emotion. Now, scientists describe a system of slowly conducting nerves in the skin that respond to gentle touch. Investigators are beginning to characterize these nerves and to describe the fundamental role they play in our lives as a social species. Their work also suggests that this soft touch wiring may go awry in disorders such as autism.
Can Faith & Belief Help Prevent Depression? Should we be asking more about the spiritual reasons for depression?...
Enduring Happiness: Why is my Partner so Mean to Me? Greg came into his second counseling with the question – “Why is my wife so mean to me? Does she enjoy it?” This is the wrong question because it puts the problem into the hands of another party. In effect, he is trying to figure out someone else’s motivations, which...
3 Tips for Dealing with Anxious Thoughts Negative, worry-filled thoughts perpetuate our anxiety. They also paralyze us from taking action and can prevent us from leading a fulfilling life. Sometimes, we mistakenly assume worry helps us circumvent potential catastrophes: If we aren’t worried, something terrible will happen. But as licensed psychologist and anxiety expert Tamar E. Chansky,...
Anger and Resentment. Are You Setting Yourself Up? Feeling a little resentful or angry at someone? Annoyed with a friend? Fed up with a co-worker? What about your honey bunny? Want to scream when he enters the room? Then you have probably set yourself up for some resentment. How? The Unconcious Deal I have found that when resentment rears its...
Device for stopping uncontrolled seizures implanted in patient Last month the first hospital outside of a clinical trial site implanted a pacemaker-like device in the brain of a patient. This may be a game-changer for patients with epilepsy. The device, called the RNS System, was implanted April 17, 2014 in a patient with seizures that previously could not be controlled with medication, or intractable epilepsy. The patient has recovered completely from the surgery.
Forgiveness: The Wonderful Psychological Perks Studies show that being forgiving benefits mental and physical health.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:8 Wonderful Psychological Effects of Being Compassionate 4 Wonderful Ways Meditation Relieves Pain How Memory Works: 21 Psychological Insights PsyBlog’s 10 Most Popular Psychological Insights From 2012 20 Wonderful Effects Exercise Has on the Mind
Narcissism: Identifying Key Traits, Definition, Symptoms and Risk Factors nate2b via Compfight In contrast to a person with codependency tendencies, described in a previous article as a rigid pattern of relating to self and key others with little or no sense of self or own wants and needs as valuable, significant or even viable, a person with indicators for...
Narcissism: Key Traits, Symptoms and Risk Factors nate2b via Compfight In contrast t0 codependency tendencies, described previously as a rigid pattern of relating to key others (and self) with little or no sense of own wants and needs as valuable, significant or even viable, those with indicators for narcissism have a rigid pattern of relating to others as...
Narcissism: Identifying Key Traits, Symptoms and Risk Factors nate2b via Compfight In contrast to codependency tendencies, described in a previous article as a rigid pattern of relating to key others (and self) with little or no sense of own wants and needs as valuable, significant or even viable, those with indicators for narcissism have a rigid pattern of...
Executive function deficits can lead to attentional impairments during alcohol dependence Previous research has shown that alcohol-dependent (AD) individuals exhibit frontal lobe abnormalities. A focus on memory-executive dysfunctions, however, has led to a neglect of several other high-level cognitive functions, such as attentional biases and deficits. A study of the integrity of three attentional networks – alerting, orienting, and executive control – among AD individuals has
Yoga Lessons: The More You Resist, the More It Have you ever heard the phrase, “The more you resist, the more it persists”? One of my yoga instructors used this phrase at the end of class last week. My fellow yogis and I were relaxing in savasana (or, the corpse pose). The keyword here is “relaxing.” Yoga Lessons: Don’t...
Taste of Longevity: Long Life is Sweet Fascinating new research: “Bitter tastes could have negative effects on lifespan, sweet tastes had positive effects,” reports Science Daily.  At least, in fruit flies. Michael Waterson, a Ph.D graduate student in U-M’s Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, explains: “Findings help us better understand the influence of sensory signals, which we...
Eat With Your Eyes Closed   Close your eyes to see—with the mind’s eye of mindfulness—what you are eating. Mindfulness is a kind of “super-vision” because it allows you to see with the eyes shut. Mindfulness “over-sees”… and, thus, serves as a platform for self-control. - Adapted from “Reinventing the Meal” (Somov, New Harbinger, 2012) Share...
Bipolar & Mood Detection on a Smartphone People who know me know that very little in the tech world gets me excited. I’ve seen so many tech ideas constantly recycled and repackaged from the 2000s, it makes me, well — I hate to admit it — but I’m a little jaded. So a few years ago, when...
Compound reverses symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in mice molecular compound developed by Saint Louis University scientists restored learning, memory and appropriate behavior in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, according to findings in the May issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. The molecule also reduced inflammation in the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory. The paper, authored by a
How movies may make you drink more Alcohol use is widespread in contemporary movies, often portrayed positively or even glamorized. Unlike alcohol advertisements, movies display alcohol in a more subtle way, yet little is known about how these portrayals affect a viewer’s experience and engagement in the movie. A study of the effects of alcohol portrayals in movies has found that positive
There’s A Reason I Like To Work Alone I love working by myself. I can chatter away at my boss and I know he’s no smarter than I am. And if I do something that has ADHD written all over it, I don’t have to explain it to anyone … well, maybe the client. And if I choose...
Forming A Support Network Everyone needs a good support network, regardless of if they’ve been diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder or not. Support networks are a group of people we can call on during times of trouble. People we can check in with periodically just to make sure we are doing okay. It’s a group...