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Scientists identify critical new protein complex involved in learning and memory Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a protein complex that plays a critical but previously unknown role in learning and memory formation. The study, which showed a novel role for a protein known as RGS7, was published April 22, 2014 in the journal eLife, a publisher supported by theRead More
Depressed? Researchers identify new anti-depressant mechanisms Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression. A team of physician-scientists at UT Southwestern has identified a major mechanism by which ghrelin (a hormone with natural anti-depressant properties) works inside the brain. Simultaneously, the researchers identified a potentially powerful new treatment for depression in the form of
Newly-approved brain stimulator offers hope for individuals with uncontrolled epilepsy A recently FDA-approved device has been shown to reduce seizures in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy by as much as 50 percent. When coupled with an innovative electrode placement planning system developed by physicians at Rush, the device facilitated the complete elimination of seizures in nearly half of the implanted Rush patients enrolled in the decade-long
Brain size matters when it comes to animal self-control Chimpanzees may throw tantrums like toddlers, but their total brain size suggests they have more self-control than, say, a gerbil or fox squirrel, according to a new study of 36 species of mammals and birds ranging from orangutans to zebra finches. Scientists at Duke University, UC Berkeley, Stanford, Yale and more than two-dozen other researchRead More
Child’s autism risk accelerates with mother’s age over 30 Older parents are more likely to have a child who develops an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) than are younger parents. A recent study from researchers from the Drexel University School of Public Health in Philadelphia and Karolinska Institute in Sweden provides more insight into how the risk associated with parental age varies between mothers’ andRead More
Pain curbs sex drive in female mice, but not in males “Not tonight, dear, I have a headache.” Generally speaking, that line is attributed to the wife in a couple, implying that women’s sexual desire is more affected by pain than men’s. Now, researchers from McGill University and Concordia University in Montreal have investigated, possibly for the first time in any species, the direct impact ofRead More
Research shows impact of Facebook unfriending: High school friends often first to go Two studies from the University of Colorado Denver are shedding new light on the most common type of `friend’ to be unfriended on Facebook and their emotional responses to it. The studies, published earlier this year, show that the most likely person to be unfriended is a high school acquaintance. “The most common reason forRead More
Sleep disorder linked to brain disease Researchers at the University of Toronto say a sleep disorder that causes people to act out their dreams is the best current predictor of brain diseases like Parkinson’s and many other forms of dementia. “Rapid-eye-movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is not just a precursor but also a critical warning sign of neurodegeneration that can leadRead More
Study: People pay more attention to the upper half of field of vision A new study from North Carolina State University and the University of Toronto finds that people pay more attention to the upper half of their field of vision – a finding which could have ramifications for everything from traffic signs to software interface design. “Specifically, we tested people’s ability to quickly identify a target amidstRead More
Speed-reading apps may impair reading comprehension by limiting ability to backtrack To address the fact that many of us are on the go and pressed for time, app developers have devised speed-reading software that eliminates the time we supposedly waste by moving our eyes as we read. But don’t throw away your books, papers, and e-readers just yet — research suggests that the eye movements weRead More
Five Things I Heard in Early Recovery That Blew My Mind My first few weeks of sobriety, I heard expressions that changed the way I viewed my life—none more so than these.read more
An Hour Later You're Hungry Again Not Just With Chinese Food The higher the highs, the lower the lows. The more fun you're having, the more you'll miss it when it's over. Happiness is relative, and once you've had some you want to be sustained in the manner to which you are accustomed. read more
Depressed? Researchers identify new anti-depressant mechanisms, therapeutic approaches Breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression are being made by researchers. A team of physician-scientists has identified a major mechanism by which ghrelin (a hormone with natural anti-depressant properties) works inside the brain. Simultaneously, the researchers identified a potentially powerful new treatment for depression in the form of a neuroprotective drug known as P7C3. The study is notable because although a number of anti-depressant drugs and other treatments are available, an estimated one in 10 adults in the U.S. still report depression.
3 Signs You’re In an Ego Battleship Instead of Would you ask your poorest friend for financial advice? While they may be well intentioned, they likely don’t have the skills to make good suggestions when it comes to money. Instead, you would likely turn to higher source of reliable information, someone whose financial decisions you admire. However, when it...
9 Ways We Set Ourselves Up To Be Controlled Do you often feel like others are controlling? Or do you feel like the pressures of life are too much? Do you give your power away to others and feel helpless? If so, this post will shed light on how you might be setting yourself up to feel controlled by...
6 Steps for Overcoming Boredom in Your Relationship It’s perhaps inevitable that, over time, a relationship loses some of its zest. There are many benefits to feeling comfortable with your long-term partner, but if you're not careful, this may become a slippery slope into outright boredom. These 6 steps will help you restore that perfect balance by helping you define and overcome the problems causing your own boredom.read more
Life stressors trigger neurological disorders, researchers find When mothers are exposed to trauma, illness, alcohol or other drug abuse, these stressors may activate a single molecular trigger in brain cells that can go awry and activate conditions such as schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder and some forms of autism. Until now, it has been unclear how much these stressors have impacted the cells of a developing brain. Past studies have shown that when an expectant mother exposes herself to alcohol or drug abuse or she experiences some trauma or illness, her baby may later develop a psychiatric disorder later in life. But the new findings identify a molecular mechanism in the prenatal brain that may help explain how cells go awry when exposed to certain environmental conditions.
Trust of Strangers Requires Effort (Sometimes) Trust is important. You have to trust that people will generally deal with you honestly, and that they will follow through on their commitments. After all, you do not know all the people who grow your food, make your clothes, and take care of your money in the bank. You do not have the time to do all of these things for yourself.read more
Why Trust Isn't Easy Trust is important. You have to trust that people will generally deal with you honestly, and that they will follow through on their commitments. After all, you do not know all the people who grow your food, make your clothes, and take care of your money in the bank. You do not have the time to do all of these things for yourself.read more
Commonly available blood-pressure medication prevents epilepsy after severe brain injury A team of neuroscientists has shown in rats that a drug commonly prescribed for hypertension can nearly eliminate the epilepsy that often follows severe head injury. The drug blocks a receptor on astrocytes, preventing a cascade of signals that lead to inflammation and neuron damage. The experiments also prove that epilepsy results from temporary breaks in the blood-brain barrier following head trauma.