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Unconscious, Gut-Level Lie Detection? If you ask people directly whether someone is lying or telling the truth, they seem like lousy lie detectors. But what if you could find a more indirect way of finding out what they know? Then, would you find that people really do have some unconscious or implicit or gut-level knowledge of when other people are being dishonest?
The Challenges of Remote Management It's not easy to manage when you've never met your employees or your own boss. One manager's perspective...
Workplace Bullying: The Important of Catching It Early Workplace bullying is probably one of the most expensive experiences you will endure. It can cost you your job, mental, physical and financial health, and in worse cases lead to suicide. The good news is that workplace bullying has a timeline. If you intervene early enough, you can plan for...
Understanding Peer Pressure: Walking in Their Shoes Fitting in, finding acceptance, and establishing identity are activities often played out through the child’s “body self”—feelings, attitudes, and behaviors about how kids look. While this is a topic where angels (much less parents) dare not tread, parents can provide invaluable support as their children confront these challenges.
Four Ways to Increase Your Interpersonal Skills Emotionally sensitive people experience more intense emotions that are more easily aroused and that last longer than those who are not emotionally sensitive. You react faster with greater emotional intensity that lasts longer. Your emotional reactions can be triggered by television shows, magazine articles, places that trigger memories, anniversaries and...
Research illuminates ‘touchy’ subject: The Merkel cell responsible for sensing touch By solving a long standing scientific mystery, the common saying “you just hit a nerve” might need to be updated to “you just hit a Merkel cell,” jokes Jianguo Gu, PhD, a pain researcher at the University of Cincinnati (UC). That’s because Gu and his research colleagues have proved that Merkel cells— which contact many
Hallucinations I never knew that some people who live with bipolar disorder experience hallucinations – that is, until it happened to me. I am seeing a new internal medicine doctor and she asked about my bipolar disorder. She asked if I had hallucinations. I said yes. She said “Auditory or visual?”...
Researchers reveal relationships between rare languages in the Colombian Amazon The only linguistic data available for Carabayo, a language spoken by an indigenous group that lives in voluntary isolation, is a set of about 50 words. This list was compiled in 1969 during a brief encounter with one Carabayo family. Frank Seifart of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and Juan
A reality rabbit-hole from the dream world I’ve got an article in The Observer about how the science of lucid dreaming is being pushed forward by the development of ‘in-dream’ experiments. A lucid dream is where you become aware you are dreaming and where you can potentially change elements of the dream as it happens. The piece discusses how eye movements allow […]
Channel makeover bioengineered to switch off neurons Scientists have bioengineered, in neurons cultured from rats, an enhancement to a cutting edge technology that provides instant control over brain circuit activity with a flash of light. The research funded by the National Institutes of Health adds the same level of control over turning neurons off that, until now, had been limited to turning
New Research On How Your Gender Affects Your Pain Have you ever been in severe pain? I am not a happy pain sufferer. Luckily, I have never been in severe pain over a long period of time. Given the statistics though, we women might be in for this experience at some point in our lives. And I am not...
In child custody disputes, LGBT parents face bias in the courts Court decisions that favor a heterosexual parent over a gay or lesbian parent in a custody dispute often do not consider important social science research on parenting by gay and lesbian individuals, according to a new review from Drexel University. Previous research shows that gay and lesbian individuals are as effective in parenting as heterosexuals
Online reviews: When do negative opinions boost sales? When purchasing items online, reading customer reviews is a convenient way to get a real-world account of other people’s opinions of the product. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, negative reviews that are offset by a politeness-factor can actually help sell the item. “Most of the research on consumer reviews has
Spike activity 25-04-2014 Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Induced hallucination turns doctors into pizza chefs. New Scientist on a recent brain stimulation study that sadly didn’t actually get doctors to make pizza. The Telelgraph has an interesting piece on human vision and its impossibilities. There’s an excellent piece in The Guardian asking […]
More should be done for female parolees As the female prison population grows, a new study funded partly by the National Science Foundation says more should be done to help women probationers and parolees in poor urban areas remain crime-free. A team of Michigan State University criminologists found black women on probation and parole feel they have little choice but to isolate.
Acquiescence and Social Desirability: Psychometric Bogeymen It seems obvious to may lay persons and professional psychologists that people are likely to misrepresent themselves on personality tests, especially when being evaluated. After some 50 years of research, strong evidence for this alleged problem is lacking. Nonetheless, belief in response sets and styles continues, just like children's belief in the bogeyman...
When You Want What Your Friend Has There are many unspoken but virtually universal rules of friendship that have been uncovered by researchers. In the next several blogs, we are going to explore the Top 10 Rues of Friendship. We take a look at Rule #1 in this entry: Do not be jealous or critical of your friend’s other relationships...
The Age At Which You Reach Peak Cognitive Performance ...but there's a silver lining for those over the magic age.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:The Myth of Cognitive Decline: Elderly Know More and Use it Better Irregular Bedtimes Reduce Children’s Cognitive Performance Boosting Your Brainpower in Old Age: Do Scientists Really Think Mental Workouts Can Help? Green Tea Improves Working Memory Higher Risk of Mental Illness for Those With Older Fathers
Anger Management: From “No” to “Yes” During my recent workshop series in Wisconsin, I described the clinical trajectory of anger management as follows: “It’s a shift from saying “No!” to reality to saying “Yes” to reality.” Put differently, it’s a shift from taking everything personally to realizing that nothing is personal. Rudolf Steiner, the founder of...
Break the “Busy”ness Cycle: Live with More Intention Is the daily routine of life getting you down? Find your passion and live a more authentic life! Do you ever have those times when you have been on the go non-stop trying to stay on top of all your responsibilities and get all the necessary things on your “to...