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Origin of Huntington's disease found in brain; insights to help deliver therapy The gene mutation that causes Huntington’s disease appears in every cell in the body, yet kills only two types of brain cells. Why? Scientists used a unique approach to switch the gene off in individual brain regions and zero in on those that play a role in causing the disease in mice. Their findings shed light on where Huntington's starts in the brain. It also suggests new targets and routes for therapeutic drugs to slow the devastating disease, which strikes an estimated 35,000 Americans.
If You Don’t Respect Yourself, Who Will? It's really hard to connect with another person's humanity if you can't connect with your own....
The Seedy Underbelly of Rehab Centers’ Online Marketing Just over a year ago, I wrote about the curious marketing of addiction treatment centers online, which used what I believed to be deceptive marketing practices. The email that arrived on Oct. 2, 2013 piqued my curiosity yet again. It was promoting a self-made infographic about “porn addicted” communities online. ...
Research Reveals Simple Solution for Couples Who Argue How often do you find yourself snapping at one of your friends, colleagues or loved ones? Is it usually over something you wouldn’t find annoying, and can it usually be put down to just having a bad day or being stressed out? You might just need something to eat. A...
The Positive Effect of Creative Hobbies on Performance at Work Why photography, cooking or other creative hobbies might help you get on at work.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:10 Ways To Be Happier at Work Why People Secretly Fear Creative Ideas The Incubation Effect: How to Break Through a Mental Block 4 Life-Savouring Strategies: Which Ones Work Best? The Well-Travelled Road Effect: Why Familiar Routes Fly By
Every BODY Is Different: Lessons From Amy Poehler Oh, Amy Poehler, how I love thee. I won’t count the ways, but I will share this example: a video from Poehler’s YouTube channel, Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls. The video is titled “Bodies: Ask Amy” and it begins with Amy reading a letter from one of her fans: “Dear Amy,...
Questions to Spark Self-Discovery Self-reflection is a powerful tool for cultivating a fulfilling, meaningful life. When you dig deeper, you can discover “what it is you know, what you think and how you want to be in the world,” according to Rosie Molinary, who teaches body image at the University of North...
Grocery List, To Do List, Bucket List, What-Ever I’m invariably torn when I’m in the grocery store, list or no list, between things I know I’ll eat and that will be fast and easy, and things I think would be challenging and fun to cook. And that’s life for me as well. I mean, sure, there’s things that...
Tips for Worriers Help for the garden-variety worrywart
Psychology Teachers Earn APA TOPSS Award for Excellence in Teaching Award recipients recognized for commitment to psychology education
The Top 10 Leadership Competencies More than 100 years of leadership research has outlined the successful skills and abilities that are associated with leadership effectiveness. Here are the top 10.
The Body is Key in Trauma: Tips from Somatic Somatic Experiencing is a therapeutic technique based on a theory by Peter Levine. He theorizes that trauma is stored in the body and released through a discharge, ideally at the time of the incident. I remember a year and half ago I learned that a young client had died accidentally...
Sunday Silly: VIDEO “Stand-Up for Mental Health” Part 3 Youtube link: http://youtu.be/AhFL0pjlh6Q Today will be a two for 1 Sunday Silly… I will post the last past of my Stand-Up act in a few. Part 1 VIDEO: DBSA Stronger Together Conference “Stand-Up for Mental Health” Part 2 VIDEO: Stand-Up Video: Mother and Art School Part 3 Sunday Silly: VIDEO...
Sunday Silly: VIDEO “Stand-Up for Mental Health” Part 4 Youtube link: http://youtu.be/qfgLzaV_GDg Part 1 VIDEO: DBSA Stronger Together Conference “Stand-Up for Mental Health” Part 2 VIDEO: Stand-Up Video: Mother and Art School Part 3 Sunday Silly: VIDEO “Stand-Up for Mental Health” Part 3 Part 4 Sunday Silly: VIDEO “Stand-Up for Mental Health” Part 4...
The Ghost Number: Hypomania and Promiscuity They do go hand and hand, and it can be embarrassing, reckless and scary. Sometimes when I think about the time that I spent without psychiatric help I try to block those days out of my mind.  I remember the first time I went to my psychiatrist and he asked...
Alcohol use in adolescence connected to risky behavior in adulthood Teen drinking alters brain chemistry, suggesting early alcohol use has long-term effects on decision making, an animal study demonstrates. The findings could shed light on the development of alcohol and drug addiction. “In humans, the younger you are when you first experience alcohol, the more likely you are to experience problems with alcohol in adulthood," researchers say. The study bolsters the evidence that alcohol exposure early in life can have long-term effects on risk taking and decision making, which can increase a person’s risk for substance abuse problems.
Zinc supplementation shows promise in reducing cell stress after blasts Supplementation with zinc might reduce cell stress after the type of blast injury soldiers experience from IEDs, researchers say. Each year, approximately 2 million traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occur in the USA, including with soldiers, with little more than ibuprofen to treat them. Results of a new study suggest that zinc supplementation reduces blast-induced cell stress.
Fight memory loss with a smile (or chuckle) The stress hormone cortisol can negatively affect memory and learning ability in the elderly. Researchers found that showing a 20-minute funny video to healthy seniors and seniors with diabetes helped them score better on memory tests and significantly reduced their cortisol levels when compared to non-video watchers.
Unconscious, Gut-Level Lie Detection? If you ask people directly whether someone is lying or telling the truth, they seem like lousy lie detectors. But what if you could find a more indirect way of finding out what they know? Then, would you find that people really do have some unconscious or implicit or gut-level knowledge of when other people are being dishonest?
The Challenges of Remote Management It's not easy to manage when you've never met your employees or your own boss. One manager's perspective...