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Model sheds new light on sports-related brain injuries Insight into the behavioral damage caused by repeated blows to the head has been highlighted in new research. The research provides a foundation for scientists to better understand and potentially develop new ways to detect and prevent the repetitive sports injuries that can lead to the condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
Breaking Up Doesn’t Have to Mean Breaking Away It's a myth that you have to “get over” the ending of a close relationship and eliminate all reminders of your ex. According to one theory,remnants of your former relationships remain with you, becoming part of your identity for life.
Women Taking Antidepressants: Improve Sexuality with Exercise One of the most common complaints related to taking antidepressant medications is their impact on one’s sexuality. For the most antidepressants prescribed today, sexual side effects are often significant — and troubling (in a way quite different than depression is). I mean, it’s one thing to think, “Great, this medication...
Other Ways to View Your Inner Critic Last weekend I wrote about taking a business-like approach to dealing with our inner critics. Because I’ve realized that fighting or ignoring my inner critic doesn’t really work. It just seems to add fuel to an already hungry, raging fire. Other approaches that may help with our inner critic include...
A Concrete Thinker is Not a Gullible Retard I am a concrete thinker. When someone tells me something I believe it.  No matter how outlandish it seems, sometimes when someone says something in jest, there is a moment when the information enters my brain and takes it as truth. This may often be met with a laugh by...
Stroke risk reduced if brain blood vessel disorder is left alone Treating patients who suffer from a common condition that affects blood vessels in the brain increases their risk of stroke, a study has found. People with a condition known as arteriovenous malformation (AVM) -- which causes blood vessels in the brain to tangle -- have a better outcome if doctors treat their symptoms only and not the AVM. A team of doctors looked at the long-term outcome of patients with the condition, which is caused by abnormal connections between the arteries and veins in the brain.
Depression detectable in the blood: Platelet serotonin transporter function The possibility of using a blood test to detect depression has been demonstrated by researchers. While blood tests for mental illnesses have until recently been regarded as impossible, a recent study clearly indicates that, in principle, depression can in fact be diagnosed in this way and this could become reality in the not too distant future.
You Do Have the Courage to Allow Time to Help You Heal You may not think this statement is true. I know I didn’t for many, many, MANY years. This is because, while it is happening, time appears to move ohhhhh sooooo slowly. This is a problem because, when we are in pain, we want healing NOW. Like yesterday. Like what the...
Why Do Parents Complain So Much? And Should We Stop? “The way we think about our lives affects how we live them.” KJ Dell’Antonia wrote these words in a recent post on her New York Times’ Motherlode blog. She was responding to a reader’s comment questioning why our generation of parents seems to complain so much. The reader isn’t entirely...
What Your Coffee Order Says About Your Personality Survey of 1,000 coffee drinkers reveals which type are "people-pleasers" and which are the most laid-back.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Comedians Have Psychotic Personality Traits 5 Habits Proven to Reduce Risk of Alzheimer’s and Dementia Happy Habits: How to Fix Bad Moods Tidy or Messy Desk: Which is Best For The Mind? 10 Simple Habits Proven to Make You Happier
Study Shows Drinking is Even More Contagious Than You It’s no secret that drinking is contagious: if your friends are binging or abstaining, there’s a good chance you’ll follow suit. But a fascinating study on early view at the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research shows just how far this influence goes – and also shows that the social...
Diabetes duration, severity associated with brain atrophy Type 2 diabetes may be associated with brain degeneration, according to a new multi-center study. The study also found that, contrary to common clinical belief, diabetes may not be directly associated with small vessel ischemic disease, where the brain does not receive enough oxygenated blood.
I don’t deserve to be this happy: Dampening of positive feelings found to predict postpartum depressive symptoms For the first time, research shows that the dampening or suppression of positive emotions plays an important role in the development of postpartum depression. This has implications for the treatment of depressed mothers. The researchers are currently working to develop a treatment method focused specifically on counteracting dampening. Existing methods, such as mindfulness, may also have a positive effect on dampening they say.
Brain saver: Vitamin E supplement helps 'redirect' blood during stroke Strokes are a leading cause of death and long term disability in the US. With the failure of more than 1,000 experimental neuroprotective drugs, one scientist has stopped trying to discover the next new stroke treatment, and instead is trying to prevent strokes from happening in the first place. He thinks he may have found the answer in a little known member of the vitamin E family, which appears to remodel the brain’s circulatory system and provide protection the instant a stroke strikes.
Metacognition Begins With an “Oops!” You know that moment when you say “Oops!” to yourself?  An “oops” is the beginning of metacognition – the beginning of self-awareness. And now researchers have found the neural signature of ”oops”: This may open the door to a class of behaviors called metacognition, or “thinking about thinking,” the self-monitoring of...
New Studies Show Long-Term Effects of Cannabis on the With the legalization of recreational marijuana in Washington and Colorado, questions about cannabis have vaulted into the public consciousness. For a couple minutes, let’s put aside policy concerns and look just at the effects of cannabis in the brain. Two studies published in top journals, both in April 2014, look...
Do You Have Fewer Friends Since Turning 30? Look One of the articles here at Single-at-Heart that attracted a lot of interest was called What’s really difficult about turning 30: It’s harder to make friends. In it, I discussed a story by a reporter on why it is harder to make friends after 30. The story was an intriguing...
Top 3 Ways the Media Screws Up Reporting Science In the process from going from a technical journal article to a splashy soundbite, important elements can get lost. Here’s how to look out for three of the most common traps when the popular media interpret scientific data.
Why We Lie to Ourselves I recently wrote a post about being honest with yourself, and an astute reader pointed out that I hadn’t really tackled the why of lying.  Why do people engage in self-delusion (especially when it’s often to their own detriment)?  Here are some of my thoughts and observations.  I’d love if...
Best of Our Blogs: April 29, 2014 Your health is rocky at best. You don’t love your job. Your relationships could use some work. It’s hard to love much less like your life. There are more things to gripe about than to be grateful for. You’re not mindful or peaceful. You’re anything, but grace under fire. In...