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APA Applauds NBA's Response to Racist Comments
Is Asking for Help a Sign of Weakness? John came into his session with big news to report. John had been working to push his comfort zone and turns out he had more courage then he thought possible. He had been feeling discouraged about his job for some time. Recently he took a risk and had a talk...
25 Excuses We Make To Justify Drinking I have a really bad hangover and a beer might help I’m on vacation! It’s bottomless mimosas..yeah! You can’t find this drink anywhere I have to have a Sapporo when I eat sushi I had a bad day My planes been delayed It’s Cinco de Mayo (or any other Holiday)...
Things You Know and Might Not Know About ADHD Milos Milosevic via Compfight Sure, you’ve been reading ADHD blogs, and you’ve got your subscription to ADDitude Magazine. You’re a webinar junkie and you’ve been using ADD Crusher’s instructional videos to crush your ADHD. You’ve read the ADHD classics and all the latest, including ADHD According to Zoë – The...
Want to Take Better Notes? Get the Lead Out One of the modern challenges for classroom teachers, especially at the college level, is how to deal with student use of laptops and other personal technology in the classroom. A new study suggests that, even when used solely for notes, laptops may not always be the best choice.
Working memory differs by parents’ education; effects persist into adolescence Working memory—the ability to hold information in your mind, think about it, and use it to guide behavior—develops through childhood and adolescence, and is key for successful performance at school and work. Previous research with young children has documented socioeconomic disparities in performance on tasks of working memory. Now a new longitudinal study has found
Babies recognize real-life objects from pictures as early as 9 months Babies begin to learn about the connection between pictures and real objects by the time they are nine-months-old, according to a new study by scientists at Royal Holloway, University of London, and the University of South Carolina. The research, published today in Child Development, found that babies can learn about a toy from a photograph of
Watch out: Children more prone to looking but not seeing Children under 14 are more likely than adults to be ‘blinded’ to their surroundings when focusing on simple things, finds a new UCL study. It explains a somewhat frustrating experience familiar to many parents and carers: young children fail to notice their carer trying to get their attention because they have little capacity to spot
MRI shows disrupted connections in the brains of young people with ADHD A new study has found that children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have disrupted connections between different areas of the brain that are evident on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI). The results of this research are published online in the journal Radiology. The findings point to the potential of rfMRI to help
Stereotypes waning? Women leaders perceived as effective as male counterparts When it comes to being perceived as effective leaders, women are rated as highly as men, and sometimes higher – a finding that speaks to society’s changing gender roles and the need for a different management style in today’s globalized workplace, according to a meta-analysis published by the American Psychological Association. “When all leadership contexts
Children’s TV time is closely linked to parents’ viewing habits The amount of time children spend in front of TV, phone and computer screens is closely associated with their parents’ own habits, with much higher weekend viewing than during the week, a new study has found. Researchers at the University of Bristol analysed the amount of time children aged five and six spent watching television,
In recognizing speech sounds, the brain does not work the way a computer does How does the brain decide whether or not something is correct? When it comes to the processing of spoken language – particularly whether or not certain sound combinations are allowed in a language – the common theory has been that the brain applies a set of rules to determine whether combinations are permissible. Now the
Study calls for U.S. to significantly reduce the rate of incarceration Given the minimal impact of long prison sentences on crime prevention and the negative social consequences and burdensome financial costs of U.S. incarceration rates, which have more than quadrupled in the last four decades, the nation should revise current criminal justice policies to significantly reduce imprisonment rates, says a new report from the National Research Council. A
Merely observing stressful situations can trigger a physical stress response Stress is contagious. Observing another person in a stressful situation can be enough to make our own bodies release the stress hormone cortisol. This is the conclusion reached by scientists involved in a large-scale cooperation project between the departments of Tania Singer at the Max Planck Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and
Yoga can help keep expectant mothers stress free: First evidence found The effects of yoga on pregnant women has been studied, with results showing that it can reduce the risk of anxiety and depression. Stress during pregnancy has been linked to premature birth, low birth weight and increased developmental and behavioral problems in the child as a toddler and adolescent, as well as later mental health problems in the mother. A high level of anxiety during pregnancy is linked with postnatal depression which in turn is associated with increased risk of developing depression later in life.
Stem cells from teeth can make brain-like cells Researchers have discovered that stem cells taken from teeth can grow to resemble brain cells, suggesting they could one day be used in the brain as a therapy for stroke.
# 91 Buckets of Tears Shandi-lee Cox via Compfight We all cried buckets of tears that summer. After three weeks of training, Matt was flown to New York’s La Guardia Airport for the next leg of his journey to Germany. We decided to meet him there for one last good-bye. It must have been quite...
A Tale of Two Defiers Shelley, a college sophomore, is an actively aggressive defier. She prides herself on being a fiercely independent person who doesn’t need or want anyone to tell her what to do. She often resorts to fighting words in her verbal outbursts: – “How could he give me such a crappy grade?”...
With No Formal Diagnosis or Treatment Plans, How Can After more than twenty years spent treating, speaking about, and writing about sexual addiction, I’ve heard all the arguments (and then some) both in favor of and against utilizing an addiction-focused model of diagnosis and treatment to identify and help individuals who self-report repetitive, problematic patterns of impulsive and/or compulsive...
Why Do Some People Get PTSD and Others Don’t?   Trauma is complicated.  Not everyone who experiences a traumatic event has post-traumatic stress symptoms and many people who have symptoms see a natural decrease in those symptoms while others wind up with post-traumatic stress disorder.  Still others see other symptoms that are bit different and get other diagnoses.  Why?...