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Counting Coup in Recovery The Indians in North America had a ritual that was bolder than the slaying of their enemies. Warriors gained prestige by being the first to touch the enemy dead or even touching the enemy’s defensive positions. A warrior could also show his bravery by stealing the enemy’s horses. The possibility...
About Those 23 Ways Single Life is Superior For the second time in just a few months, a reporter asked me if there are scientifically-documented ways in which single people are not just doing as well as married people, but better. It was time for me to start my list, and so far, I came up with 23...
3 Ways to Quiet Self-Criticism For many of us self-criticism is just the way we talk to ourselves. Our inner dialogue regularly sounds like this: I can’t do anything right. I look horrible. What’s wrong with me? I’m such an idiot! We assume that such self-critical statements somehow safeguard against laziness, mistakes and complacency; that...
A Busy, Busy, Busy ADHD Boy Do I take on more things than I should? Of course I do. I have ADHD. Do I plan things out in advance? Of course I don’t. I have ADHD. Do I reconsider my commitments, and make my fond excuses to others when it becomes clear that I can’t follow...
Tynan Joins APA's Center for Psychology and Health Tapped to promote psychology’s importance to integrated health care
PCSD: Positive Commencement Success Decisions As you graduate from college earning your Certificate, AA, BA, MA or doctoral degree, you face a series of post commencement success decisions. My main purpose in this article is to offer seven steps to success and encourage you to think positively. Your Post Commencement Success Decisions (PCSD) establish your roadmap to your future. Comments to BernieLuskin@gmail.com
Transfused blood rejuvenates old mice Research may point to ways to reverse some effects of human aging.
Bullying victims may be more likely to bring a weapon to school A new study says thousands of kids who say they're the victims of bullying are bringing some kind of weapon to school.
A Troubled Past: When to Remember, When to Forget We often hear two conflicting messages about the painful events of the past.  Treatment for addiction and psychological problems involves remembering working through hurtful experiences.  At the same time it seems as if growth and change involve letting go of the past; forgiving, forgetting and moving on. Using the past...
Want a young child to ‘help’ or ‘be a helper’? Choice of words matters How do you get a preschooler to help with chores and other household tasks? A new study suggests that adults’ word choice can make a big difference. The study, by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the University of Washington, and Stanford University, appears in the journal Child Development. The researchers carried out two
Very overweight teens face stigma, discrimination, and isolation Very overweight teens face a social world of stigma, discrimination, and isolation because of their body size, reveals an analysis of their views, published in the online journal BMJ Open. And they have to overcome many other additional barriers to lose weight, making it especially hard for them to shed the pounds, the findings suggest. The
Diabetes duration and severity associated with brain atrophy Type 2 diabetes may be associated with brain degeneration, according to a new multicenter study published online in the journal Radiology. The study also found that, contrary to common clinical belief, diabetes may not be directly associated with small vessel ischemic disease, where the brain does not receive enough oxygenated blood. “We found that patients
Do Impostor Feelings Dampen Your Creativity? Even very talented people may experience fraud or impostor feelings, which can lead to insecurity about their abilities, despite their accomplishments. “I always feel like something of an impostor. I don’t know what I’m doing.” Jodie Foster made that comment in her acceptance speech as recipient of the Sherry Lansing...
New research shows brain’s predictive nature when listening to others Our brain activity is more similar to that of speakers we are listening to when we can predict what they are going to say, a team of neuroscientists has found. The study, which appears in the Journal of Neuroscience, provides fresh evidence on the brain’s role in communication. “Our findings show that the brains of both
Can You Tell if Someone Was Abused Based on Last week, Dr. Drew suggested a caller’s fiancée had a history of childhood sexual abuse based on her medical diagnoses.  She did, but since 1 in 4 women experience sexual assault before the age of 18, it wasn’t exactly a long shot. He also enraged a lot of women when...
25 Simple Ways to Improve Your Relationships at Work Smile. Put a smile on your face and in your eyes, voice and heart as often as possible. Make eye contact. Look people openly, warmly and squarely in the eye. Open your body language. While facing the person with whom you are talking, open your chest, your heart and your arms. Address people...
Connecting with Others Through Music It’s probably not too difficult to fathom how certain music may mirror your own thoughts and feelings. Lyrics or melodies can potentially communicate the message that you want to convey. Songs can capture an emotional state or personal situation in the best way possible. I love words, and I consider...
The Obstacle Is the Way What’s the worst problem you have right now? Have you lost your home? Your job? Are you worried you might? Or are you facing a terrible illness? Long-time readers of this blog know much of my philosophy has been shaped by my study and practice of Buddhism. One of the most useful concepts I've adapted is the concept of changing poison into medicine.
Picture books aren’t just fun: Moms are exposing toddlers to rich information about animals Children hear as much sophisticated information about animals when parents read picture book stories about animals as when they read flashcard-type animal vocabulary books, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. “Marketers tell parents and educators that vocabulary books are more educational, so picture books are often dismissed as being just for
Loss of memory in Alzheimer’s mice models reversed through gene therapy Alzheimer’s disease is the first cause of dementia and affects some 400,000 people in Spain alone. However, no effective cure has yet been found. One of the reasons for this is the lack of knowledge on the cellular mechanisms which cause alterations in nerve transmissions and the loss of memory in the initial stages of