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The Explosive Personality: Understanding Histrionic Traits Do you know someone who is emotionally explosive (blowing up at the slightest thing, becoming hysterical over minor infractions), self-centered, rageful, and distorted self-image? Have you found yourself  repeatedly blamed and devalued in confrontations or arguments with this person? Have you noticed this person is desperate for attention, shifts emotions...
Yawning to cool the brain Common belief is that yawning helps to increase the oxygen supply. However, previous research has failed to show an association between yawning and blood oxygen levels. New research by a team of researchers led by Psychologist Andrew Gallup of SUNY College at Oneonta, USA now reveals that yawning cools the brain. Sleep cycles, cortical arousal
Genetic alterations in shared biological pathways as major risk factor for ASD A substantial proportion of risk for developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD), resides in genes that are part of specific, interconnected biological pathways, according to researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, who conducted a broad study of almost 2,500 families in the United States and throughout the world. The study, titled “Convergence
People with mild cognitive impairment may die at higher rate than people without condition Mayo Clinic research studying the relationship between death and the two types of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) suggests that people who have these conditions die at a higher rate than people without MCI. The research was presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. For
Researchers tackle ‘virtually ignored’ psychological study of spite Some of the world’s nastiest behavior grows out of spite, the dark art of hurting an opponent even when it comes at a price to yourself. Divorcing couples often go out of their way to hurt each other and even their kids, skirting the more peaceful path to moving on. Tax evaders can grow so
Is Personal Intelligence Important? Could personal intelligence be as important as verbal intelligence?
Preparing for parenthood: Pregnant women show increased activity in right side of brain Pregnant women show increased activity in the area of the brain related to emotional skills as they prepare to bond with their babies, according to a new study.
When newlyweds believe in sharing household chores, follow-through is everything Of all the starry-eyed just-married couples you know, which couples are likely to stay the happiest? A study says chances for bliss are highest when husband and wife both believe in divvying up the household labor equally. But that happiness won't last long if one partner is perceived as not carrying their fair share of the load.
Can Youth Suicide Be Prevented? May is Mental Health Awareness Month and much will be written on the status of mental health care in our country over the next 30 days. As the leading peer-led national organization for people living with mood disorders, the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance is pleased to contribute to that...
Researchers find ‘Seeing Jesus in toast’ phenomenon is perfectly normal People who claim to see “Jesus in toast” may no longer be mocked in the future thanks to a new study by researchers at the University of Toronto and partner institutions in China. Researchers have found that the phenomenon of “face pareidolia”– where onlookers report seeing images of Jesus, Virgin Mary, or Elvis in objects
Chimpanzees show similar personality traits to humans Chimpanzees have almost the same personality traits as humans, and they are structured almost identically, according to new work led by researchers at Georgia State University. The research also shows some of those traits have a neurobiological basis, and that those traits vary according to the biological sex of the individual chimpanzee. “Our work also
Scientists identify new protein in the neurological disorder dystonia A collaborative discovery involving Kansas State University researchers may lead to the first universal treatment for dystonia, a neurological disorder that affects nearly half a million Americans. Michal Zolkiewski, associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics at Kansas State University, and Jeffrey Brodsky at the University at Pittsburgh co-led a study that focused on a
Can you tell a person’s gender by their ‘World of Warcraft’ game avatar? A sexy wood elf with pointy ears. A hulking ogre with blue skin. An intimidating heroine with a buxom breastplate. When it comes to computer games, players can choose to be anyone or anything. But gamers don’t always mask their true identities with online avatars. According to a new study by researchers at Concordia University,
‘Exploding head syndrome’ — a real but overlooked sleep disorder It sounds like a phrase from Urban Dictionary, or the title of an animated gif, but a Washington State University researcher says “exploding head syndrome” is an authentic and largely overlooked phenomenon that warrants a deeper look. “It’s a provocative and understudied phenomenon,” said Brian Sharpless, a WSU assistant professor and director of the university
Black male incarceration can compromise research studies Federal restrictions on including prisoners in medical research have negatively impacted research involving black men, who are disproportionately imprisoned, according to a study by Yale School of Medicine researchers. Because individuals who are already in ongoing studies must be dropped if they are incarcerated, this compromises the ability of researchers to examine racial disparities in
New ‘magnifying glass’ helps spot delinquency risks Drug abuse, acts of rampage – what’s really the matter with kids today? While there are many places to lay blame – family, attitude, peers, school, community – a new study shows that those risks vary in intensity from kid to kid and can be identified. Scientists at Washington State University and Pennsylvania State University
Common, Baffling Mental Habit Linked to Depression Research has shown that those suffering with depression display a common yet self-sabotaging mind habit. This habit prevents them from feeling and enjoying the positive emotions that naturally throughout the course of a day. A new study conducted by KU Leuven suggest that those with depression (in this case, postpartum...
Calling All Yogis: Which of the 8 Limbs of Yoga International recently published an an ashtanga yoga Q&A with seasoned yogi Richard Freeman. Among other things, Freeman talks about the importance of breath, practicing mindfulness, and acting compassionately, but the question — and more specifically, answer — that caught my attention was about the 8 limbs of yoga and...
Coming Out of the Bipolar Closet I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in October 2008. I didn’t know I was bipolar. I didn’t know about mania or mixed episodes. I only knew my old friend depression. But a smart psychiatrist asked the right questions and got the right answer – bipolar 1. I believe my suicide...
Social workers can help patients recover from mild traumatic brain injuries A 20-minute conversation with a social worker has the potential to significantly reduce the functional decline of those diagnosed with a mild traumatic brain injury. More than a million people are treated for mild traumatic brain injuries in U.S. hospitals and emergency rooms each year. Yet few receive appropriate psychological and social follow-up care that can make the difference in whether or not they fully recover.