Article Description
The Realm of Love: Getting Real Once when I broke up with a man, I was struggling with getting over him. When he quickly got engaged to someone else, I was devastated. At the time, I was going to school and confided in my professor, who invited me to look deeper at my grief: “Consider whether...
Why Do We Yawn? It's not to do with inhaling more oxygen or expelling more carbon dioxide.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Why Do People Yawn? Does The Weather Affect Your Mood? Women 3 Times More Likely to Wear Red or Pink When Fertile Happiness is Contagious and Powerful on Social Media Connectivity: The Difference Between Men’s and Women’s Brains
5 Ways to Impress the People you Need to Impress Whether it’s in social relationships or at work, we’re often put on the spot to make a great impression. Unfortunately, the higher the stakes, the more challenging you find this task. By following 5 relatively simple principles, you can not only look impressive to others, but feel good about yourself in the process.
When You Didn’t Get the Mother You Deserved For some of my adult clients, Mother’s Day is painful.  That’s because they are surrounded by exhortations to tell their mothers how much they love her.  But what if they don’t feel that?  What if they missed out on the kind of mother they deserved? I’m assuming that if you’re...
Coping with Anxiety Anxiety happens to everyone. It can occur in new situations, testing or assessments, performance evaluations, competition and even asking something of another. Some may continue to feel anxious even after the nerve-wracking activity has ended. It can manifest as a “gut feeling” or as physical symptoms, such as sweating and...
‘Rice theory’ explains north-south China cultural differences, study shows A new cultural psychology study has found that psychological differences between the people of northern and southern China mirror the differences between community-oriented East Asia and the more individualistic Western world – and the differences seem to have come about because southern China has grown rice for thousands of years, whereas the north has grown
Study confirms mitochondrial deficits in children with autism Children with autism experience deficits in a type of immune cell that protects the body from infection. Called granulocytes, the cells exhibit one-third the capacity to fight infection and protect the body from invasion compared with the same cells in children who are developing normally. The cells, which circulate in the bloodstream, are less able to deliver
Researchers capture handoff of tracked object between brain hemispheres When tracking a moving object, the two halves of the human brain operate much like runners successfully passing a baton during a relay race, says a University of Oregon researcher. In a study online ahead of print in Current Biology, electroencephalogram (EEG) measured brainwaves from healthy young adults revealed how information about an attended object —
Psychologists explain how neurotic people may benefit from a romantic relationship It is springtime and they are everywhere: Newly enamored couples walking through the city hand in hand, floating on cloud nine. Yet a few weeks later the initial rush of romance will have dissolved and the world will not appear as rosy anymore. Nevertheless, love and romance have long lasting effects. Psychologists of the German
Quick test can help spot depressed teenagers A few minutes spent filling out a widely accepted mental health assessment in a health care provider’s waiting room could make a big difference for some teenagers suffering from depression, according to new study from a nursing researcher at The University of Texas at Arlington. Sharolyn Dihigo, a nurse practitioner and clinical assistant professor in
Longevity gene may boost brain power Scientists showed that people who have a variant of a longevity gene, called KLOTHO, have improved brain skills such as thinking, learning and memory regardless of their age, sex, or whether they have a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Increasing KLOTHO gene levels in mice made them smarter, possibly by increasing the strength of
Taking the Plunge? Keep These 12 Successful Marriage Tips Are you really ready to get married? See the 12 predictors of lasting love. The truth is answering the question, “Am I really ready to get married?” is the most important issue to consider. In fact, there are 12 indicators of a successful marriage that can help you decide if...
Autism-related protein shown to play vital role in addiction A gene essential for normal brain development, and previously linked to Autism Spectrum Disorders, also plays a critical role in addiction-related behaviors, researchers report. The team used animal models to show that the fragile X mental retardation protein, or FMRP, plays a critical role in the development of addiction-related behaviors. FMRP is also the protein that is missing in Fragile X Syndrome, the leading single-gene cause of autism and intellectual disability.
Rare, childhood neurodegenerative diseases linked to common problem in DNA repair Two rare, inherited childhood neurodegenerative disorders are being studied by researchers who have identified a new, possibly common source of DNA damage that may play a role in other neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and aging. Researchers showed for the first time that an enzyme required for normal DNA functioning causes DNA damage in the developing brain. DNA is the molecule found in nearly every cell that carries the instructions needed to assemble and sustain life.
Longevity gene may boost brain power: Researchers discover the gene may enhance cognitive abilities Scientists showed that people who have a variant of a longevity gene, called KLOTHO, have improved brain skills such as thinking, learning and memory regardless of their age, sex, or whether they have a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Increasing KLOTHO gene levels in mice made them smarter, possibly by increasing the strength of connections between nerve cells in the brain.
A Vision for Psychological Check-Ups Should we encourage folks to get psychological check-ups? If so, what would they look like?
How Your Name Influences How Believable You Are What's in a name?→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:10 Ways Your Voice Influences Other Minds Why People’s Names Are So Hard to Remember Gesturing While Talking Influences Thoughts The Myth of Cognitive Decline: Elderly Know More and Use it Better Memory Enhanced by a Simple Break After Reading
Are Religious Beliefs Going To Screw Up First Contact? Are humans really prepared to meet an extraterrestrial civilization in this century? A new study suggests we're psychologically ill-prepared for this monumental event — and that the prominence of religious beliefs has a lot to do with it....
The Concept “Rock Bottom” May Perversely Keep People Using There is no one “rock bottom” an addict must hit.
What's Wrong With 'Rock Bottom' There is no one “rock bottom” an addict must hit.