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The brain: Key to a better computer Your brain is incredibly well-suited to handling whatever comes along, plus it’s tough and operates on little energy. Those attributes -- dealing with real-world situations, resiliency and energy efficiency -- are precisely what might be possible with neuro-inspired computing. Neuro-inspired computing seeks to develop algorithms that would run on computers that function more like a brain than a conventional computer.
Combat A Giant Health Risk With Low Lighting Getting the right amount of sleep is important for our physical and mental health. What can we do about it? Dim the lights!...
Stereotyping Depression in Television When we turn on the TV often times the commercials that depict depression show a person in the dark, resting in emotional turmoil, sadness, walking in a forest alone and secluded. I find some of it comical yet sad that society gets fed these images that inaccurately depict depression. Stereotypes...
5 Essentials for a Strong (and Pleasurable) Relationship You should NOT treat your relationship like a chew toy, something you sink your teeth into every time you get bored, frustrated, or need to sharpen your fangs.
Dads can parent, too: Neural pathway to parenthood seen in mice Galanin neurons in the brain's medial preoptic area that appear to regulate parental behavior, a mouse study finds. If similar neurons are at work in humans, it could offer clues to the treatment of conditions like post-partum depression. "If you look across different animal species, there are some species in which the father contributes to caring for the young -- sometimes the work is divided equally, sometimes the father does most of the work -- and there are species in which the father does nothing," a researcher said. "The essential question is where is that variability coming from? We may be tempted to say that the mom has the neurons required to engage in parental behavior, and dads don't -- this paper shows that's wrong."
50 Years of Leadership: Women Rated As Effective Or More So Than Men What's the difference between how women see themselves and how they are seen by others?→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Women 3 Times More Likely to Wear Red or Pink When Fertile Are Men or Women Better at Multitasking? Empathy: Women Better Under Stress But Men Worse Are Men or Women More Cooperative? Men Want Women to Split Dating Costs But Are Scared to Ask
It's Hard to Be a Narcissist in a Recession The press and some psychologists love ragging on Millennials for their narcissistic tendencies. But the young people I come in contact with aren't especially self-centered, at least not more so than most twentysomethings of previous generations. New research suggests young people might not be so narcissistic after all—especially those who grew up in hard economic times.
Get me a sledge hammer: Depression as anger turned About 8 years ago, during my last major depression, I was told that depression was anger turned inward and that if I did not get rid of my anger, I would not get better. This baffled me because at the time I felt nothing but hopelessness. I had emotionally flatlined....
Suggestions for Quieting Your Inner Critic According to Jodie Gale, MA, a psychotherapist and life coach in Sydney, Australia, all of us have an inner critic. “Living with a strong inner critic can be life debilitating; it stops us from achieving growth and from living life to our full potential.” Where does this critic come from?...
What Causes Fear (and What to Do About It) I had an epiphany this morning. In fact, it is for just such mornings as these that I don’t mind being my own lab rat, studying my emotions, my choices, my habits and preferences, as if the survival of the human race (or at least one sole representative sample of...
This is your brain on meditation: Brain processes more thoughts, feelings during meditation, study shows Meditation is more than just a way to calm our thoughts and lower stress levels: our brain processes more thoughts and feelings during meditation than when you are simply relaxing, a coalition of researchers has found. "The study indicates that nondirective meditation allows for more room to process memories and emotions than during concentrated meditation," says a co-author of the study.
Studying behavior using light to control neurons Some of the neurons responsible for behavioral decisions in rats have been identified in a new study. Using a technique that employs light to control nerve cell activity, researchers inactivated a region of the brain and showed that it caused the rats to behave more flexibly while trying to get a reward. The technique, called optogenetics, allows researchers to “show that the firing or inhibition of certain neurons has a causative relationship with a given behavior, whereas previous methods only allowed us to correlate neuronal activity with behavior,” says one researcher.
Uniqueness is Beyond Comparison In my work with perfectionists I often ask: “Are you unique?”  Clients typically nod: “Yes.” And then I say: “To be unique is to be one of a kind, right?  Right.  If you are one of a kind, then no one is like.  Right?  Right.  If so, then what is the...
Primates and patience — the evolutionary roots of self control A chimpanzee will wait more than two minutes to eat six grapes, but a black lemur would rather eat two grapes now than wait any longer than 15 seconds for a bigger serving. It’s an echo of the dilemma human beings face with a long line at a posh restaurant. How long are they willing
Medications can help adults with alcohol use disorders reduce drinking Several medications can help people with alcohol use disorders maintain abstinence or reduce drinking, according to research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The work, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), provides additional options for clinicians to effectively
Only a Fool Pursues Happiness While I’m sure our Founding Fathers were well-intentioned, the “pursuit of happiness” is not really something one should consciously work toward. “How can I be happier?” is a question I often get. But people who ask this are really pursuing the wrong thing. You can’t “catch” happiness like some sort...
Unsure memories of murder The BBC News site has a special multimedia feature on a case of false confession to murder that has been been troubling Iceland from the 1970s and has recently erupted again. The Beeb have clearly gone a bit ‘Scandinavian detective drama’ on the whole thing but it is a gripping story, not least because it […]
How Do External Rewards Impact Your Behavior? When you want to get someone to do something, such as getting your kids to do their homework, what is the best way to motivate them? Many people might start by offering some type of reward like a special treat or toy. This is a great example of what is known in psychology as extrinsic motivation, since the behavior is motivated by a desire to gain an external reward. Unlike intrinsic motivation, which arises from within the individual, extrinsic motivation is focused purely on outside rewards....Read Full Post
Your Life as an Experiment (and the tools you   So you decided to change your life for the better. You have resolved to become more positive, more connected, or more resilient, perhaps to become healthier or to have a stronger sense of meaning and purpose.  Motivated and determined to transform your life, you start to read and to...
Sense of Obligations Lead to Trusting Strangers, Study Says Guilt may be a contributing factor