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The NFL’s Brandon Marshall and His Mental Health Crusade I am a mental health consumer and advocate. I am also a huge NFL fan. So, I’m extremely excited about the Chicago Bears’ Brandon Marshall. A few days ago, Marshall received the biggest Bears’ wide receiver contract ever—3 years at $30 million. It’s obvious from this payout that he’s a...
Best of Our Blogs: May 23, 2014 I spent twenty minutes concocting a story about the woman sitting across of me on the airplane. She was elderly, well-dressed, and polite. She also quietly requested to be moved to another seat. As she listened to the flight attendant apologize for the full plane, I secretly analyzed her. I...
Do You Hear The ADHD Music Do you have ADHD? Do you find yourself easily distracted? Do you think sometimes that you are so different you may have originated on a different planet? Do you forget things? Do you forget the list when you go shopping? Do you stray from the list if you remember it?...
When One Wedding Is Not Enough When writers of movies and TV shows want to reach for an easy plot line, they all come up with the same sort of answer – a marriage proposal, a wedding, or some other tired old form of matrimania. It doesn’t matter what the genre is – comedies, dramas, crime...
An Exercise for Getting to Know Yourself One of my favorite topics to explore on Weightless, in addition to cultivating a positive body image and compassionate self-care, is self-discovery. (I also like to explore self-discovery on Psych Central’s main blog “World of Psychology.”) That’s because in order to care for ourselves, it’s important to know what we...
It’s Easy to Forget the Bad Stuff Last week’s cartoon,  which is about a man all women want, (even if they don’t admit it),  is here.  All rights reserved, and content including cartoons is © Donna Barstow 2014,  My own website is Donna Barstow Cartoons. And Like me  on Facebook to get notified of new cartoons. Thanks!...
7 Dirty Little ADHD Secrets – Part II Cedward Brice via Compfight Yesterday we covered the first three of seven dirty little ADHD secrets. Draw near. Shhhhh… remember, I’m not supposed to be sharing these. Let’s keep this between you and me, ok? Dirty Little ADHD Secrets #4 – 7 4 ) We’re smarter than you Don’t worry,...
Caveman instincts may explain our belief in gods and ghosts By Steve Kelly, Strathclyde University Notions of gods arise in all human societies, from all powerful and all-knowing deities to simple forest spirits. A recent method of examining religious thought and behaviour links their ubiquity and the similarity of our beliefs to the ways in which human mental processes were adapted for survival in prehistoric
A new target for alcoholism treatment: Kappa opioid receptors The list of brain receptor targets for opiates reads like a fraternity: Mu Delta Kappa. The mu opioid receptor is the primary target for morphine and endogenous opioids like endorphin, whereas the delta opioid receptor shows the highest affinity for endogenous enkephalins. The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) is very interesting, but the least understood of
Growing inequalities make science more of a ‘winner takes all’ field As new research documents growing inequalities in health and wealth, the gap between “haves” and “have-nots” is growing in the field of scientific research itself, says University of Michigan sociologist Yu Xie. “It’s surprising that more attention has not been paid to the large, changing inequalities in the world of scientific research, given the preoccupation
Aggressive behavior observed after alcohol-related priming Researchers from California State University, Long Beach, the University of Kent and the University of Missouri collaborated on a study to test whether briefly exposing participants to alcohol-related terms increases aggressive behavior. It has been well documented by previous research that the consumption of alcohol is directly linked to an increase in aggression and other
What is being said in the media and academic literature about neurostimulation? Over the past several decades, neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have gradually gained favour in the public eye. In a new report, published yesterday in the prestigious scientific journal Neuron, IRCM ethics experts raise important questions about the rising tide of tDCS coverage in the media, while regulatory action is lacking and
Despite economic blows, infant health has improved among US poor Despite worsening economic conditions for those at the bottom, infant health has steadily improved among the most disadvantaged Americans, according to a review published in Science by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. The researchers cite programs and policies like Medicaid, the Supplemental Feeding Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and the
Repeated sexual assault victims report more psychological problems than previously thought According to recent studies, one in five adult women and one in 100 adult men have reported being raped. The prevalence increases to two in five among women and one in five among men who report experiencing other forms of sexual violence, such as repeatedunwanted sexual contact and sexual coercion. Now, researchers at the University
Think positively about sleep by all means, but you can’t fool your body By Gemma Paech, University of South Australia and Siobhan Banks, University of South Australia Sleep – elusive, precious, restful sleep – is a topic close of many of our hearts. Such is the importance of this activity that sometimes people cling on to half-baked ideas about it with an unnatural fervour. Consider a paper on
Do men have a higher threshold for pain, or are they just a bit emotionally repressed? By Edmund Keogh, University of Bath It’s a commonly held belief that women are better able to tolerate pain than men. The reasoning behind this is often that women are built to withstand pain because of how frequently they experience pain in their lives from events such as periods and childbirth. On the other hand,
Five brain challenges we can overcome in the next decade By Barbara Sahakian, University of Cambridge Just prior to him leaving office, I was asked by John Beddington, the UK’s chief scientific adviser, to scope the future of neuroscience over the next ten years. It seemed to me that the best way to consider this was to determine how we could improve brain health for
Energy and Depression Psychiatrist Dan Siegel once got a definition of energy from a conference of physicists: “It’s the capacity to make stuff happen.” “Making stuff happen” is extremely important when we’re talking about depression, since depression acts primarily as a monitor and regulator of energy level. Like a nuclear power plant technician,...
How to Get the Balance Right in Your Couple Relationship One of my favourite pastimes as a child was playing on the playground equipment in the local park. Walking home from school each day, I anticipated the joy and freedom of those moments; the swing that swept you up to meet the vast and ever-changing sea that is the sky, the metal slide that threatened […]
One-third of all brain aneurysms rupture: size is not a significant risk factor Approximately one third of all brain aneurysms rupture during a patient's lifetime, resulting in a brain haemorrhage. A recent study demonstrates that, unlike what was previously assumed, the size of the aneurysm does not significantly impact the risk of rupture. The total number of individual risk factors is more important. Smoking, for example, increases the risk for ruptures, particularly in women.