Article Description
Promising approach to slow brain degeneration in Huntington's disease uncovered Blocking a specific class of glutamate receptors can improve motor learning and coordination, and prevent cell death in animal models of Huntington's disease, research shows. As Huntington's disease is an inherited condition that can be detected decades before any clinical symptoms are seen in humans, this research could lead to preventive treatments that will delay the onset of symptoms and neurodegeneration.
Getting to the Good Part in Therapy When I was young, my mom would drive me to the airport for my return flight to California after a visit. The trip to the airport was about 20 minutes. Inevitably we would get into an intensely personal conversation where I would share whatever fears and insecurities I felt. At...
The day video games ate my school child The BBC is reporting that a UK teachers union “is calling for urgent action over the impact of modern technology on children’s ability to learn” and that “some pupils were unable to concentrate or socialise properly” due to what they perceive as ‘over-use’ of digital technology. Due to evidence reviewed by neuroscientist Kathryn Mills in […]
Why Losing a Loved One to Suicide Complicates Grief Suicide is unfortunately so common that everyone knows someone who has committed suicide. From the classmate who hung himself just six weeks before high school graduation to the widow who found her husband in their bedroom to the man who’s father shot himself and left him the head of the...
Preventing Future Isla Vistas - Sucking the Poison Out As a former clinical psychiatrist, suicide specialist/interventionist, out of the box trainer of FBI and police hostage negotiators and someone who’s passionate about neuroscience, I was hoping to be able to make sense of such shootings and more importantly how to intervene effectively with such troubled individuals before they act on their imbalanced minds.
Sound and vision: Visual cortex processes auditory information, too "Seeing is believing," so the idiom goes, but new research suggests vision also involves a bit of hearing too. "So, for example, if you are in a street and you hear the sound of an approaching motorbike, you expect to see a motorbike coming around the corner. If it turned out to be a horse, you'd be very surprised," researchers said.
Mice with 'mohawks' help scientists link autism to two biological pathways in brain “Aha” moments are rare in medical research, scientists say. As rare, they add, as finding mice with Mohawk-like hairstyles. But both events happened in a lab, months after an international team of neuroscientists bred hundreds of mice with a suspect genetic mutation tied to autism spectrum disorders.
Police Missed Locking Up Elliot Rodger, Santa Barbara Mass On Friday, a month after police were first alerted to Elliot Rodger’s odd YouTube videos and paid him a visit, Rodger took out revenge as he had promised on his “Day of Retribution.” Luckily for the rest of us, his “Day of Retribution” apparently lasted about 20 minutes. Which is...
52 Terrific Tips for Writing Better Why shouldn’t you benefit from my hoarded load of 52 tips, quotes, and links about writing and the writing life?
The Law of Unintended Consequences When I say the word commitment out loud, I cringe. The word alone makes me feel as if I’ve been sentenced to prison without bail, or that someone accidentally squirted a slice of lemon in my eye. This is ironic, since I am a commitment advocate. I encourage friends to...
The High Reliability Personality---With Notable Values High Reliability Organizations are the cutting edge with regard to safety and high performance across the health care spectrum. High reliability, however, begins with individuals: self-reflection, assessing personal values, action plans for refining quality of life that extends beyond self to others!
Analyzing Photos - 10 Important Things To Think About We love to analyze photos of friends or even politicians but are they always reliable in letting us know what people are thinking, feeling, desiring, or intending?
What the Internet is Doing to Young Minds 87% of US teachers think the internet is creating a distracted generation. Is it really true?→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:“Is the Internet Good/Bad For You?” and Other Dumb Questions Remote Control of the Mind – Over the Internet Why People Believe Weird Things and 8 Ways to Change Their Minds Making Music Dramatically Improves Young Children’s Behaviour Debunked: ‘Right-Brain’ and ‘Left-Brain’ Personalities
10 Small Ways to Cultivate Mindful Moments Sometimes, we move about our days as though we are asleep or at the mercy of someone else’s duties and dreams. In her book Head to Heart: Mindfulness Moments for Every Day , author and coach Jenifer Madson invites readers to awaken to our lives. Specifically, she shares 365 meditations...
UCSB Shooting: When stuff hits the fan Six people died.  And of course the gunman killed himself. He was in his early twenties. He said: “I will be a god compared to you. You will all be animals. You are animals, and I will slaughter you like animals. I hate all of you. Humanity is a disgusting,...
Time for Love: 8 Important Relationship Lessons from Pets If you’re like me, there are days when your “to do” list seems endless. This morning as I read through the list of things that absolutely had to get done today, one of my four cats jumped in my lap and began to purr vigorously. I petted him for a...
Victims want to change, not just punish, offenders A series of experiments conducted by researchers affiliated with Princeton University has found that punishment is only satisfying to victims if the offenders change their attitude as a result of the punishment. “Revenge is only ‘sweet’ if the person reacts with a change in attitude, if the person understands that what they did was wrong.
Important peculiarities of memory A slide from what looks like a fascinating talk by memory researcher Robert Bjork is doing the rounds on Twitter. The talk has just happened at the Association for Psychological Science 2014 conference and it describes some ‘Important peculiarities of memory’. You can click the link above if you want to see if the image, […]
Letting it go: Take responsibility, make amends and forgive yourself Forgiving ourselves for hurting another is easier if we first make amends — thus giving our inner selves a “moral OK,” according to Baylor University psychology researchers. The research, published in The Journal of Positive Psychology, is significant because previous studies show that the inability to self-forgive can be a factor in depression, anxiety and a weakened
Study indicates most young adults have a healthy mistrust of the information on Twitter Nearly anyone can start a Twitter account and post 140 characters of information at a time, bogus or not, a fact a new study’s participants seemed to grasp. The study is published in Springer’s journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review by lead investigator Kimberly Fenn, assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University. It is the first such study to