Article Description
Vitamin D can lower weight, blood sugar via the brain, study finds Vitamin D treatment acts in the brain to improve weight and blood glucose (sugar) control in obese rats, according to a new study. "Vitamin D deficiency occurs often in obese people and in patients with Type 2 diabetes, yet no one understands if it contributes to these diseases," said the study's principal investigator. A region of the brain called the hypothalamus controls both weight and glucose, and has vitamin D receptors there.
Veterans with blast traumatic brain injury may have unrecognized pituitary dysfunction In soldiers who survive traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, pituitary dysfunction after their blast injury may be an important, under-recognized, and potentially treatable source of their symptoms, a new study finds. "Our study suggests that deficiencies in the pituitary's growth hormone and testosterone are commonly seen after blast traumatic brain injury, especially in patients who are overweight," says an investigator.
Sensitive? Emotional? Empathetic? It could be in your genes Do you jump to help the less fortunate or cry during sad movie scenes? If yes, you may be among the 20 percent of our population that is genetically pre-disposed to empathy, according to a study. The results provide further evidence that highly sensitive people are generally highly tuned into their environment, and provide evidence that especially high levels of awareness and emotional responsiveness are fundamental features of humans characterized as HSPs.
When Parents Conflict over Their Adolescent To preserve their partnership, parents must not let the disagreements about the adolescent become divisive of the marriage.
Where in the World Do People Live Alone? One of the most significant demographic revolutions has been the dramatic rise in the number of people who live alone. It is a phenomenon that is not limited to Western nations. In their academic book, Living Alone: Globalization, Identity and Belonging, Lynn Jamieson and Roona Simpson offer the most comprehensive...
Do HIPAA Regulations Act as Barriers to Care? Privacy rights and protections of health information take on a special meaning when participating in mental health care. Many factors contribute. Stigma, family dynamics and employability are just a few reasons why it is important to protect a patient’s medical records from prying eyes. However, some would argue that HIPAA...
ADHD Parents: Stop Blaming Yourselves I had a great childhood, but I had a rough time anyway. When I was growing up, we didn’t know about ADHD. That was partly because we lived in a somewhat remote area, but mostly because ADHD had not been defined at that point as ADHD. Back then, it was...
How often do men really think about sex? Every seven seconds? Probably not. But rather than wonder about whether this is true, Tom Stafford asks how on earth you can actually prove it or not. We’ve all been told that men think about you-know-what far too often – every seven seconds, by some accounts. Most of us have entertained this idea for long […]
The Internet has changed how we curse Most swear words are used to convey emotion and not for their literal meaning.
Are Polite People More Violent and Destructive? Polite people seem to make society flow more smoothly. But a new experiment shows that they’re more likely to inflict harm on others. As we stumble in the search for a more livable world, we might want to embrace the people who rub us the wrong way occasionally. They’re more likely to choose the less destructive path.
APA Recognized as a Top Workplace by the Washington Post Award notes community involvement and healthy lifestyle offerings
Waiting to Trust: Life in Recovery Limbo For the partner of a sex addict, even one who is in recovery for a year or two, mistrust can develop a life of its own. The addict seems to be doing everything right but for some reason you are unable to feel happy or at peace. Sometimes even little...
10 Ways to Thrive if You’re Highly Sensitive   Do people tell you that you’re too “thin-skinned” or overly reactive? Do you tend to pick up on other people’s energy to the point where you “catch” their moods? Does being around a large group of people drain you? Do you need a lot of time alone to regroup...
Love is Auto-telic, Hate is Auto-exaleiphic When we love, we love the fact that we love. We love to love. Love is auto-telic* (self-reinforcing). When we hate, we hate the fact that we hate. We hate to hate. Hate is auto-exaleiphic** (self-limiting). Notice this distinction in yourself.*** - * Auto-Telic/autotelic: auto is Greek for “self” and...
Are Antidepressants Enough? Zinc, exercise, Vitamin D and potential stress busters top the list of new possibilities to supplement the widespread use of antidepressant medicines. The latest research is welcome because antidepressants only work about half the time, and they often come with unwanted side effects, such as low libido, weight gain, and...
What is Heart Rate Variability? And Why Does it Matter? How emotionally flexible are you?
Get Overwhelmed? Maybe This Easy Grounding Kit Can Summer. A season when we break routines. Maybe school is out. Maybe you’re going on vacation. Maybe you’re covering for other people who are going on vacation. Even good change causes stress, so it’s smart to stay aware that even these good breaks can bring stress and throw us off...
Computers can now accurately judge how masculine or feminine your face is Computers can mimic human perception of gender, according to new research published in the prestigious international journal PLOS One. A multi-disciplinary team of three computer scientists and two human anatomy experts at The University of Western Australia has, for the first time, developed a mathematical model that matches the gender scores people give to human faces [...]
How size-related food labels impact how much we eat Just what size is a “small” drink—8 ounces, 12 ounces, 16 ounces? The truth is, those are all “small” sizes depending on what restaurants and fast food joints you go to. As customers, we are used to ordering food based on relative size, but according to a new study from Cornell University, these seemingly standard [...]
Americans more likely to become depressed from job loss than Europeans due to lack of safety net A new study published online in the International Journal of Epidemiology (IJE) shows that while job loss is associated with depressive symptoms in both the USA and Europe, the effects of job loss due to plant closure are much stronger in American workers as compared with European workers. The ‘Great Recession’ of 2008 caused significant [...]