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Get it over with: People choose more difficult tasks to get jobs done more quickly Putting off tasks until later, or procrastination, is a common phenomenon — but new research suggests that “pre-crastination,” hurrying to complete a task as soon as possible, may also be common. The research, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggests that people often opt to begin a task as soon as possible just to get
Can anti-depressants help prevent Alzheimer’s disease? A University of Pennsylvania researcher has discovered that the common selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram arrested the growth of amyloid beta, a peptide in the brain that clusters in plaques that are thought to trigger the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Penn, in collaboration with investigators at Washington University, tested the drug’s effects on
4 Ways to Stop Being Needy and Start Being Confident Are you coming across as needy or confident? Find out! Trust me, you need to read this article. Why? Because I was that needy girl. Fine on the first date, content if I was not that into him, but as soon as I liked him I fell apart. I did...
People Choose Spouses With Similar DNA You can tell their DNA is similar because their arms are stuck at the same angle.→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Similarities in Dopamine System Between Highly Creative People and Schizophrenics Fear of Math: How Much is Genetic? The Cheerleader Effect: Why People Appear Better-Looking in Groups People Are More Moral in the Morning The Genetic Predisposition to Focus on the Negative
A 5-Step Survival Guide to Overcoming Criticism No one likes to be criticized, but when handled well, criticism can be the basis for growth and richer, and more rewarding relationships. These 5 tips show how you can survive, and benefit, from the critical words of your most important relationship partners.
Wild Animals Sneak Onto Laboratory Running Wheels to Exercise The wheel-running rodent is frequently associated with animals inside psychology laboratories. But what would happen if you gave wild animals access to a wheel? A pair of researchers found out....
What’s Your Toddler Thinking? Toddlers can be mystifying beings.  You’re cruising through a good morning, and then suddenly, they melt down at what seems like an entirely insignificant event (the loss of a sock would not be unheard of.)  What’s happening in that toddler brain? Developmentally, toddlers have some features in common with adolescents.   Both are trapped...
Can Cannabis Cause Psychosis? A Hard Question to Answer Although a number of long-term studies have linked cannabis use to later risk of mental illness, the question of whether the one causes the other remains unresolved. The possibility that a third factor, such as genetic or personality predispositions, underlies both cannabis use and the development of psychosis needs to be considered more carefully in future research.
Psychology Around the Net: May 24, 2014 Grab a cup of coffee (or tea, or whatever you prefer) and check out these mental health- and psychology-related tidbits from around the ‘net this week. The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding: Entrepreneur takes a look at the psychology of color, explaining the importance of color in branding...
Do You Really Need to Cure Your Perfectionism? Perfectionism is only sometimes a problem. Advice for perfectionists and the people around them.
Surviving Post-Mother’s-Day Blues Are you over Mother’s Day yet? And by that I mean, have you recovered from it? Healed again? Found your balance after the stormy emotions it might have rained down on you? Because for many people this single day in the calendar echoes painfully in their hearts for much, much...
A Doctor’s Most Dreaded Patient: The Addict It is an unfortunate reality that most doctors don’t like treating addiction, and they don’t like addicts. They’ll treat the consequences of the disease but they won’t always confront the underlying issues, discuss treatment options or provide referrals to an addiction specialist or even a self-help support group like AA....
Biologists identify new neural pathway in eyes that aids in vision A type of retina cell plays a more critical role in vision than previously known, a team led by Johns Hopkins University researchers has discovered. Working with mice, the scientists found that the ipRGCs – an atypical type of photoreceptor in the retina – help detect contrast between light and dark, a crucial element in
Scientists find an unlikely stress responder may protect against Alzheimer’s In surprise findings, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered that a protein with a propensity to form harmful aggregates in the body when produced in the liver protects against Alzheimer’s disease aggregates when it is produced in the brain. The results suggest that drugs that can boost the protein’s production specifically in
Genes discovered linking circadian clock with eating schedule For most people, the urge to eat a meal or snack comes at a few, predictable times during the waking part of the day. But for those with a rare syndrome, hunger comes at unwanted hours, interrupts sleep and causes overeating. Now, Salk scientists have discovered a pair of genes that normally keeps eating schedules in sync
Fruit flies show mark of intelligence in thinking before they act Fruit flies ‘think’ before they act, a study by researchers from the University of Oxford’s Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour suggests. The neuroscientists showed that fruit flies take longer to make more difficult decisions. In experiments asking fruit flies to distinguish between ever closer concentrations of an odour, the researchers found that the flies
Many mental illnesses reduce life expectancy more than heavy smoking Serious mental illnesses reduce life expectancy by 10-20 years, an analysis by Oxford University psychiatrists has shown – a loss of years that’s equivalent to or worse than that for heavy smoking. Yet mental health has not seen the same public health priority, say the Oxford scientists, despite these stark figures and the similar prevalence
Screening for autism: There’s an app for that Most schools across the United States provide simple vision tests to their students—not to prescribe glasses, but to identify potential problems and recommend a trip to the optometrist. Researchers are now on the cusp of providing the same kind of service for autism. Researchers at Duke University have developed software that tracks and records infants’
Brain imaging reveals clues about chronic fatigue syndrome A brain imaging study shows that patients with chronic fatigue syndrome may have reduced responses, compared with healthy controls, in a region of the brain connected with fatigue. The findings suggest that chronic fatigue syndrome is associated with changes in the brain involving brain circuits that regulate motor activity and motivation. Compared with healthy controls,
Social marketing at the movies Word-of-mouth marketing is recognized as a powerful route from long-tail sales to blockbuster, whether one is talking about the latest fishy ice cream flavor or a Hollywood romantic comedy. In the age of social media and online networking sites, such as Twitter and Facebook, the potential for spreading the word could mean the difference between