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Researchers find portable, low-cost optical imaging tool useful in concussion evaluation Two separate research projects, published recently, represent important steps toward demonstrating on patients the utility of portable, optical brain imaging for concussion and substantiating -- via a large-scale statistical analysis -- computerized neurocognitive testing for concussion.
The Perfect Partner The thing that is really hard, and really amazing, is giving up on being perfect and beginning the work of becoming yourself.” ~ Anna Quindlen But is there really such a thing as the perfect partner? Yeah, I think there actually is, at least one who is perfect for you—but your...
Stuck in Adolescence: Helping Your Young Adult Act Like She looks like an adult, sounds like an adult and occasionally dresses like an adult. But take a closer look and you’ll see someone who more closely resembles a teenager than a bona fide grown-up. The increasingly common phenomenon of taking the long road to adulthood goes by different names...
Chimps Like Listening to Music with a Different Beat, Research Finds Nonhuman primates preferred African, Indian tunes over strong beats typical of Western music
Shawn Ladd’s Excellent Amen Clinics Adventure – Part I As promised in yesterday’s blog post, I’d like to introduce guest blogger Shawn Ladd, who is gracious enough to share his experiences at the Amen Clinics in Costa Mesa, CA. Thanks, Shawn! I recently spent three days at the Amen Clinic in Costa Mesa, CA for further assessment and diagnosis...
7 Sure Signs that Life is Calling you to Grow The scariest thing about a crossroad in life isn’t the risk of making a change. Crossroads are all important times in life when the opportunity to grow is at its highest. And it really can be intimidating. These are times when everything we’ve invested into life seems to be on...
Using multiple pictures in an ad? Different perspectives can confuse consumers Have you ever wondered what it would be like to see the ocean from a private balcony at a luxury resort? Self-imagery is a powerful marketing tactic and many ads use pictures that help you see yourself using a product or service. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, showing photos from [...]
New insights for coping with personality changes in acquired brain injury Individuals with brain injury and their families often struggle to accept the associated personality changes. The behavior of individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) is typically associated with problems such as aggression, agitation, non-compliance, and depression. Treatment goals often focus on changing the individual’s behavior, frequently using consequence-based procedures or medication. In the current issue [...]
People with tinnitus process emotions differently from their peers, researchers report Patients with persistent ringing in the ears – a condition known as tinnitus – process emotions differently in the brain from those with normal hearing, researchers report in the journal Brain Research. Tinnitus afflicts 50 million people in the United States, according to the American Tinnitus Association, and causes those with the condition to hear [...]
Do disruptive classes really get better if they include more girls? By Catherine Kelly, University of Manchester Classrooms are highly complex environments. Maintaining a positive classroom environment, especially in classrooms that include potentially disruptive children with emotional or social problems, is very difficult, and the processes that teachers can use to achieve this are poorly understood. But a new study has concluded that in mixed gender [...]
Our dependence on digital devices may affect sleep and memory By Clio Korn, University of Oxford As smartphones have become ubiquitous, parents and teachers have voiced concerns that a technology-rich lifestyle is doing youngsters harm. Research on this question is still in its infancy, but other branches of study can give us a clue to what we are likely to find. Studies on stress, sleep [...]
Traumatic Brain Injury in Veterans May Increase Risk of Dementia Older veterans who have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are 60 percent more likely to later develop dementia than veterans without TBI, according to a new study.
Letting Go and Moving On After a Breakup or Divorce Heartbreak hurts. Loss is shattering. Put these two together and you’ve got the lovely one-two punch that can come with breakups of short-lived or long-term relationships. It brings most everyone down. Otherwise emotionally-guarded people crumble into a mess of anger, sadness and confusion. Task-oriented folks lose focus and motivation. Forgiving...
GLBT Addiction and Recovery: An Interview with Jeff Zacharias Because I sometimes find that the issues therapists deal with differ by region, I like to chat with men and women at the forefront of our profession in various areas of the country. Among these clinical leaders is Jeff Zacharias, Owner, President, and Clinical Director of New Hope Recovery Center...
The Core Need I find it useful to conceive of character and well-being as being shaped by the fundamental need to be known and valued by self and important others.
Why I Use Placebo Effects in Therapy So it’s totally not ethical for my doctor to give me a sugar pill and tell me it will make me feel happier, more energetic and confident. But the evidence shows that if she did, there’s a pretty good chance I’ll feel happier, more energetic and confident. In order to...
The normality trap I remember taking a bus to London Bridge when, after a few stops, a woman got on who seemed to move with a subtle but twitchy disregard for her surroundings. She found herself a seat among the Saturday shoppers and divided her time between looking out the window and responding to invisible companions, occasionally shouting […]
Chronic brain damage not as prevalent in NFL players, say researchers A different take on previous information regarding the prevalence of chronic brain damage in retired NFL players is being proposed by researchers. Researchers performed in-depth neurological examinations of 45 retired NFL players, ranging in age from 30-to 60-years old. "Our results indicated that there were brain lesions and cognitive impairments in some of the players; however the majority of the individuals in our study had no clinical signs of chronic brain damage to the degree that has been noted in previous studies," said the lead author.
8 Instances When No Response Is the Best Response There are many situations where it’s extremely difficult not to respond, especially when someone has just clobbered your buttons. But in tense, problematic circumstances it never makes much sense to respond—or better, react—impulsively. What’s needed is a moment to reflect on whether your instant reaction, if expressed, will make things better . . . or, more likely, worse.
Neural sweet talk: Taste metaphors emotionally engage the brain Researchers have found that taste-related metaphors such as 'sweet' actually engage the emotional centers of the brain more than literal words such as 'kind' that have the same meaning. If metaphors in general elicit a similar emotional response, that could mean that figurative language presents a 'rhetorical advantage' when communicating with others.