Article Description
The Cause Of ADHD Revealed Okay, I think I’ve figured something out. The cause of ADHD is everywhere. It’s iodine. I mean think about it, iodine is in the salt we eat, and no matter how we try to avoid salt, it’s in everything. Of course you’re asking why doesn’t everyone have ADHD. Well, if...
Postpartum Depression Or Bipolar Disorder When I got pregnant with our seventh child Mollie, Emmie was only 10 weeks old at the time. At first I was on top of the world that I was pregnant with baby number seven. Hubs and I had always wanted a big family and we assumed if anyone could...
Why is Institutional Betrayal so Traumatic? Since the posting on psychcentral a year ago of the article called “Organizational Infidelity Amplifies Sexual Trauma“there has been a great deal of attention paid to the poor handling of sexual trauma by institutions such as universities, the military and the church. That article cited a study showing that victims...
A key to success – with interest We are constantly looking for ways to maximize our success. Recent research suggests our level of interest may have a substantial impact, both in terms of our level of performance as well as its sustainability.
Accepting Loss Humor is a very powerful tool to help in every situation when used properly.  It can build up, or tear down.  I try to use it to build.  Today’s Mental Health Humor cartoon looks cute and feels cute and is cute, but is about a serious subject… Accepting Loss.   Or...
New stem cell research points to early indicators of schizophrenia Using new stem cell technology, scientists at the Salk Institute have shown that neurons generated from the skin cells of people with schizophrenia behave strangely in early developmental stages, providing a hint as to ways to detect and potentially treat the disease early. The findings of the study, published online in April’s Molecular Psychiatry, support the
Some Guidelines to Minimize Conflict and Maximize Connection I often hear clients ask whether it’s always wise to express their true feelings — and how to share them in ways that invite contact rather than conflict. Some people insist that every feeling they notice needs to be expressed to their partner or friends.They fear that by holding back,...
When Diagnoses are Harmful I have seen and heard the following from clients and clinicians: A client goes for inpatient care at a hospital for suicidal thoughts and comes out with a borderline personality diagnosis after a 30 minute assessment. Clients who have been diagnosed with bipolar II whose symptoms disappear once we treat...
Anti-craving drug and counseling lower alcohol harm in homeless, without sobriety demands Chronically homeless, alcohol-dependent individuals might benefit from a new intervention that does not require them to stop or even reduce drinking, according to the results of a preliminary study in Seattle. Participants in the 12-week pilot program received monthly injections of an anti-craving medication, extended-release naltrexone. They also met regularly with study physicians to set
Justifying wartime atrocities alters memories Stories about wartime atrocities and torture methods, like waterboarding and beatings, often include justifications – despite whether the rationale is legitimate. Now, a study by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School shows how those justifications actually creep into people’s memories of war, excusing the actions of their side. The researchers report in Psychological Science shows how Americans’ motivation
A vestige of patriarchy? Study strikes a blow to the theory of sexual economics New research suggests that men — not women — are the ones who tend to view sex as if it were a commodity to be exchanged. The findings appear to debunk a theory known as sexual economics. “In concert, the findings support our reasoning that sexual economics is a vestige of patriarchy rather than a system that
Distance influences accuracy of eyewitness IDs Eyewitness accuracy declines steadily and quite measuredly as the distance increases. Additionally, a good deal of guess work or so-called “false alarms” also comes into play as the distance increases. These findings have implications for the trustworthiness of eyewitness accounts that are used to solve criminal cases. Research led by James Lampinen of the University of
Leptin also influences brain cells that control appetite, researchers find Twenty years after the hormone leptin was found to regulate metabolism, appetite, and weight through brain cells called neurons, researchers have found that the hormone also acts on other types of cells to control appetite. Leptin, a naturally occurring hormone, is known for its hunger-blocking effect on the hypothalamus, a region in the brain. Food intake is influenced by signals that travel from the body to the brain. Leptin is one of the molecules that signal the brain to modulate food intake.
How to erase a memory –- and restore it: Researchers reactivate memories in rats Researchers have erased and reactivated memories in rats, profoundly altering the animals’ reaction to past events. The study is the first to show the ability to selectively remove a memory and predictably reactivate it by stimulating nerves in the brain at frequencies that are known to weaken and strengthen the connections between nerve cells, called synapses.
A Bite of Knowledge from a Tree of Mindful Eating   When you eat a fruit, such as an apple, you are stepping—wittingly or unwittingly—into someone else’s reproductive cycle, becoming involved in a kind of ménage à trois with a tree and Earth in a life-giving project. In fact, when you eat a piece of fruit, you are literally eating...
A Parental Guide to Surviving the Teen Years Are you a parent of an adolescent? Are you so upset with your teen that you’re ready to enroll him or her in the “Witless Protection Program?” A new identity! Wouldn’t that be a superb solution to getting your teen to renounce his risky behavior, shut her mouth and show...
Enzyme used in antidepressants could help researchers develop prostate cancer treatments An enzyme commonly used as a target for antidepressants may also promote prostate cancer growth, an international team of scientists report. The study found that suppressing the enzyme monoamine oxidase A, or MAOA, may reduce or even eliminate prostate tumor growth and metastasis in laboratory mice. The finding could open the door for physicians to use antidepressants to fight prostate cancer. Currently, drugs that inhibit MAOA enzymes are used to treat patients with mental illnesses like depression.
My Top Four Criteria for a Psychiatrist After My Last week, I visited my new psychiatrist for the first time. After seven years with my last doctor, her retirement forced me into a much-needed change. Besides the appointment being two hours behind schedule, during my work day, the visit was productive and encouraging. After the visit, in the spirit...
How to Spot and Deal with Manipulative People Psychological manipulation can be defined as the exercise of undue influence through mental distortion and emotional exploitation, with the intention to seize power, control, benefits and privileges at the victim’s expense. How can you successfully manage these situations? Here are eight keys to handling manipulative people...
Vocal Fry: Why Women Should Avoid Speaking With a ‘Creaky’ Voice From Meredith Grey in Grey's Anatomy, through Britney Spears, the Kardashians and Katy Perry. They all do it, but how is vocal fry perceived?→ Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:10 Ways Your Voice Influences Other Minds Connectivity: The Difference Between Men’s and Women’s Brains 50 Years of Leadership: Women Rated As Effective Or More So Than Men Are Men or Women Better at Multitasking? Women 3 Times More Likely to Wear Red or Pink When Fertile