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Unpicking the autism puzzle by linking empathy to reward By Bhismadev Chakrabarti, University of Reading Empathy is at the heart of human social life. It allows us to respond appropriately to others’ emotions and mental states. A perceived lack of empathy is also one of the symptoms that defines autism. Understanding this is key to devising effective therapies. While empathic behaviour takes many forms, [...]The post Unpicking the autism puzzle by linking empathy to reward appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Moral victories’ might spare you from losing again It’s human nature to hate losing. Unfortunately, it’s also human nature to overreact to a loss, potentially abandoning a solid strategy and thus increasing your chances of losing the next time around. That’s one conclusion of a Brigham Young University study published this week by the journal Management Science. The finding is based on an analysis of [...]The post ‘Moral victories’ might spare you from losing again appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers find epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain’s prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to UC Irvine scientists. This epigenetic alteration of gene activity in brain cells that receive this neurotransmitter showed for the first time [...]The post Researchers find epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders appeared first on PsyPost.
Philosopher uses game theory to understand how words, actions acquire meaning Why does the word “dog” have meaning? If you say “dog” to a friend, why does your friend understand you? Kansas State University philosopher Elliott Wagner aims to address these types of questions in his latest research, which focuses on long-standing philosophical questions about semantic meaning. Wagner, assistant professor of philosophy, and two other philosophers and a mathematician [...]The post Philosopher uses game theory to understand how words, actions acquire meaning appeared first on PsyPost.
Mental health issues uncovered in kids with relatives in manhunt after Boston Marathon attack Children with relatives who were called upon to participate in the interagency manhunt following the Boston Marathon attack carried a particularly heavy mental health burden, according to a Depression and Anxiety study that included surveys of Boston-area parents and other caretakers. Researchers found that the proportion of youth with likely PTSD was 5.7 times higher among youth [...]The post Mental health issues uncovered in kids with relatives in manhunt after Boston Marathon attack appeared first on PsyPost.
Homophobia is a health hazard, not just for Australian swimmer Ian Thorpe By Anne Mitchell, La Trobe University Ian Thorpe coming out as gay during an interview with Michael Parkinson last night was both the most ordinary of stories and the most extraordinary. It also showed how deeply homophobia is ingrained in Australian society. It was ordinary because, over the last 20 years, my colleagues and I [...]The post Homophobia is a health hazard, not just for Australian swimmer Ian Thorpe appeared first on PsyPost.
Chris Pine Has a Secret   5 Life Lessons from Chris Pine Chris Pine is one of the fastest rising stars in Hollywood and it seems folks want to know everything about him. Fans are curious about who Pine is dating, what he looks like shirtless and if those aqua blue eyes are real! This...
Why Your Potential is Unlimited and You Should Read “What one can be, one must be!” ― Abraham Maslow I’m sure you’ve heard at some point in your life, “You have a lot of potential!” (If not, then jump on the bandwagon of potential, because you do!) We may not realize it at the time but we are all infinite potential....
Diagnostic criteria for Christianson syndrome Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson syndrome was first reported only in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. A new study that doubles the number of cases now documented in the scientific literature provides the most definitive characterization of CS to [...]The post Diagnostic criteria for Christianson syndrome appeared first on PsyPost.
Your Profile Photo Is A Liar Psychology researchers want us to know something about our profile photo-centrism – it’s a lie, and it’s leading us to draw conclusions that likely have zero basis in reality.
Missing sleep may hurt your memory Lack of sleep, already considered a public health epidemic, can also lead to errors in memory, finds a new study by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of California, Irvine. The study, published online in the journal Psychological Science, found participants deprived of a night’s sleep were more likely to flub the details [...]The post Missing sleep may hurt your memory appeared first on PsyPost.
Study links enzyme to Alzheimer’s disease Unclogging the body’s protein disposal system may improve memory in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), according to a study from scientists at Kyungpook National University in Korea published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. In AD, various biochemical functions of brain cells go awry, leading to progressive neuronal damage and eventual memory loss. One example is [...]The post Study links enzyme to Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain waves show learning to read does not end in 4th grade, contrary to popular theory Teachers-in-training have long been taught that fourth grade is when students stop learning to read and start reading to learn. But a new Dartmouth study in the journal Developmental Science tested the theory by analyzing brain waves and found that fourth-graders do not experience a change in automatic word processing, a crucial component of the reading shift theory. Instead, [...]The post Brain waves show learning to read does not end in 4th grade, contrary to popular theory appeared first on PsyPost.
Nearsightedness increases with level of education and longer schooling Education and behavior have a greater impact on the development of nearsightedness than do genetic factors: With each school year completed, a person becomes more nearsighted. The higher the level of education completed, the more severe is the impairment of vision. These are the conclusions drawn by researchers at the Department of Ophthalmology at the [...]The post Nearsightedness increases with level of education and longer schooling appeared first on PsyPost.
Large twin study suggests that language delay due more to nature than nurture A study of 473 sets of twins followed since birth found that compared to single-born children, 47 percent of 24-month-old identical twins had language delay compared to 31 percent of non-identical twins. Overall, twins had twice the rate of late language emergence of single-born children. None of the children had disabilities affecting language acquisition. The [...]The post Large twin study suggests that language delay due more to nature than nurture appeared first on PsyPost.
New research links bad diet to loss of smell Could stuffing yourself full of high-fat foods cause you to lose your sense of smell? A new study from Florida State University neuroscientists says so, and it has researchers taking a closer look at how our diets could impact a whole range of human functions that were not traditionally considered when examining the impact of [...]The post New research links bad diet to loss of smell appeared first on PsyPost.
Mothers of children with autism benefit from peer-led intervention Peer-led interventions that target parental well-being can significantly reduce stress, depression and anxiety in mothers of children with disabilities, according to new findings released today in the journal Pediatrics. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers from Vanderbilt University examined two treatment programs in a large number of primary caregivers of a child with a disability. Participants in [...]The post Mothers of children with autism benefit from peer-led intervention appeared first on PsyPost.
Try, try again when learning a new language? Study says no When it comes to learning languages, adults and children have different strengths. Adults excel at absorbing the vocabulary needed to navigate a grocery store or order food in a restaurant, but children have an uncanny ability to pick up on subtle nuances of language that often elude adults. Within months of living in a foreign [...]The post Try, try again when learning a new language? Study says no appeared first on PsyPost.
Parents rank their obese children as ‘very healthy’ A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine-led study suggests that parents of obese children often do not recognize the potentially serious health consequences of childhood weight gain or the importance of daily physical activity in helping their child reach a healthy weight. The study is published online in the Journal of the Academy of [...]The post Parents rank their obese children as ‘very healthy’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Lessons from ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ If you’re brave enough to leave behind everything familiar and comforting, which can be anything from your house to bitter, old resentments, and set out on a truth-seeking journey, either externally or internally, and if you are truly willing to regard everything that happens to you on that journey as...