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New 'flight simulator' technology gives neurosurgeons peek inside brain before surgery A novel technology that serves as a "flight simulator" for neurosurgeons is being used before surgery, allowing the physicians to rehearse complicated brain surgeries before making an actual incision on a patient. The new simulator creates an individualized walkthrough based on 3D imaging taken from the patient's CT and MRI scans. Surgeons then plan and rehearse the surgeries using the unique software, which combines life-like tissue reaction with accurate modeling of surgical tools and clamps, to enable them to navigate multiple-angled models of a patient's brain and vasculature.
Has Technology Hijacked Your Quality of Life? Eight steps Unless you’ve been living in a cave since the mid-90’s, it’s probably not news to you that the domination of electronic technology in our lives is growing to a level that not only threatens to do great harm to our overall quality of life, but there is overwhelming evidence that...
Faith & Recovery From Mental Illness & Addiction Often I hear of people who enter treatment with deep questions about the meaning of their own life and life in general, and then come to belief in God....
“Borderline” Provocations Part VII: Parasuicidality Being in a relationship, by blood or romance, with someone with traits of borderline personality disorder is incredibly challenging. In Part VII of this series, I discuss one of the most problematic and frightening of all aspects of the disorder: parasuicidality (suicide attempts, gestures, threats and non-suicidal self-injurious behavior).
Me, Ourselves and We: Multiple Personalities R Us Integrity isn't being of one mind; it's being honest about being of several minds.
Here's A Survey To Determine How Much People Lie In Surveys What percentage of your income do you give to charity? If you saw an injured bunny rabbit, would you try to help it? These are questions with a "right" answer. And there's another survey to determine whether the person answering is likely to give that "right" answer, no matter what they'd actually do....
When couples disagree on stroke recovery, one partner can suffer When a stroke survivor and his/her caregiving spouse disagree on the survivor's rate of recovery, the caregiver is more likely to experience depression and emotional distress. Researchers found that the magnitude of the discrepancy in spousal perception is key to predicting depression in caregivers. They add that the magnitude of the discrepancy in perceptions between survivors and spousal caregivers is key to predicting depression in spousal caregivers -- which can then cycle back onto the survivors.
Aging Gracefully What can high school reunions and research teach us about aging well?
How You Can Help Too Much “I help too much. My kids tell me it is so annoying. What is wrong with helping?”  My girlfriend Anna was saying this to me over coffee last week. In Anna’s situation, she has an adult daughter who is married. She found out her son-in-law had hurt his ankle. Anna decided...
Why Is Home More Stressful Than the Workplace? It certainly goes against conventional wisdom, but according to a new study, reported in The Wall Street Journal, we experience more stress at home than we do at work, measured by cortisol levels in the blood.
BPA Substitute as bad as BPA? Exposure to BPA substitute causes hyperactivity and brain changes in fish A chemical found in many “BPA free” consumer products, known as bisphenol S (BPS), is just as potent as bisphenol A (BPA) in altering brain development and causing hyperactive behavior, an animal study finds.
Emotional Contagion on Facebook? More Like Bad Research Methods A study (Kramer et al., 2014) was recently published that showed something astonishing — people altered their emotions and moods based upon the presence or absence of other people’s positive (and negative) moods, as expressed on Facebook status updates. The researchers called this effect an “emotional contagion,” because they purported...
What a Jasmine Flower Has Taught Me About Trust About a month ago, I acted upon a long-delayed dream. I became Mommy to a hatchling red-foot tortoise named Malti. Malti is an Indian girl’s name that means “small fragrant jasmine flower.” She is very small indeed (3″ from nose to tail tip). Her fragrance comes in the form of trust....
Musical Training Increases Executive Brain Function in Children and Adults People with musical training make better choices and their brains process information more efficiently.Advertisement:→ Please participate in a PSYCHOMETRIC TEST on CIVIC BEAUTY at http://CitiesBeautiful.org Related articles:New Study of Improvising Jazz Pianists Shows Similar Brain Circuits Used for Music and Language Making Music Dramatically Improves Young Children’s Behaviour Childhood Poverty and Stress Harms Adult Brain Function The Psychology of Why Kids (and Adults) Should Play Outside Irregular Bedtimes Reduce Children’s Cognitive Performance
60 hours without my antidepressants? I went to visit my daughter this weekend. She lives about 2-1/5 hours away. Half way there I realized I had forgotten my medications. I take three medications, two antidepressants and mood-stabilizer. I have been taking them for 7 years. Every day. Morning. Night. I don’t mess around and skip...
Vitamin D can lower weight, blood sugar via the brain, study finds Vitamin D treatment acts in the brain to improve weight and blood glucose (sugar) control in obese rats, according to a new study. "Vitamin D deficiency occurs often in obese people and in patients with Type 2 diabetes, yet no one understands if it contributes to these diseases," said the study's principal investigator. A region of the brain called the hypothalamus controls both weight and glucose, and has vitamin D receptors there.
Veterans with blast traumatic brain injury may have unrecognized pituitary dysfunction In soldiers who survive traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, pituitary dysfunction after their blast injury may be an important, under-recognized, and potentially treatable source of their symptoms, a new study finds. "Our study suggests that deficiencies in the pituitary's growth hormone and testosterone are commonly seen after blast traumatic brain injury, especially in patients who are overweight," says an investigator.
Sensitive? Emotional? Empathetic? It could be in your genes Do you jump to help the less fortunate or cry during sad movie scenes? If yes, you may be among the 20 percent of our population that is genetically pre-disposed to empathy, according to a study. The results provide further evidence that highly sensitive people are generally highly tuned into their environment, and provide evidence that especially high levels of awareness and emotional responsiveness are fundamental features of humans characterized as HSPs.
When Parents Conflict over Their Adolescent To preserve their partnership, parents must not let the disagreements about the adolescent become divisive of the marriage.
Where in the World Do People Live Alone? One of the most significant demographic revolutions has been the dramatic rise in the number of people who live alone. It is a phenomenon that is not limited to Western nations. In their academic book, Living Alone: Globalization, Identity and Belonging, Lynn Jamieson and Roona Simpson offer the most comprehensive...