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New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer’s, related diseases There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, but the research community is one step closer to finding treatment. University of Washington bioengineers have designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body’s normal proteins into a state that’s linked to widespread diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, [...]The post New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer’s, related diseases appeared first on PsyPost.
Don’t tell me the good news yet: Early warning about goal completion a buzzkill Set goal, work to achieve goal, attain goal and react accordingly — that’s the script we write when we set our sights on an achievement. But what happens when the script isn’t followed, and you learn too soon that you will accomplish what you set out to do? New research from the University of Chicago [...]The post Don’t tell me the good news yet: Early warning about goal completion a buzzkill appeared first on PsyPost.
Glucose ‘control switch’ in the brain key to both types of diabetes Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have pinpointed a mechanism in part of the brain that is key to sensing glucose levels in the blood, linking it to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The findings are published in the July 28 issue of Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences. “We’ve discovered that the [...]The post Glucose ‘control switch’ in the brain key to both types of diabetes appeared first on PsyPost.
Stimulation of brain region restores consciousness to animals under general anesthesia Stimulating one of two dopamine-producing regions in the brain was able to arouse animals receiving general anesthesia with either isoflurane or propofol. In the August issue of Anesthesiology, investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) report that rats anesthetized with continuous doses of either agent would move, raise their heads and even stand up in response to [...]The post Stimulation of brain region restores consciousness to animals under general anesthesia appeared first on PsyPost.
Think You’re Not Guilty of Verbal Abuse? Think Again Never speak badly about yourself. It’s a simple statement, one many of us would agree with in concept. But do you follow it’s advice? Probably not. Because our inner critic speaks to us in a voice so familiar we rarely notice it’s presence. Recently, I had a friend say out...
Squashing Mania I truly did not want to go back to being manic. Some people chase their mania’s, but I’ve learned the crash is too horrible to enjoy a mania for too long. I did all I could to avoid it, sleeping right, staying on schedule, making sure I took my medications....
New tools help neuroscientists analyze ‘big data’ In an age of “big data,” a single computer cannot always find the solution a user wants. Computational tasks must instead be distributed across a cluster of computers that analyze a massive data set together. It’s how Facebook and Google mine your web history to present you with targeted ads, and how Amazon and Netflix [...]The post New tools help neuroscientists analyze ‘big data’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Ancient and tiny part of the brain signals how bad things could be An evolutionarily ancient and tiny part of the brain tracks expectations about nasty events, finds new UCL research. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, demonstrates for the first time that the human habenula, half the size of a pea, tracks predictions about negative events, like painful electric shocks, suggesting a role [...]The post Ancient and tiny part of the brain signals how bad things could be appeared first on PsyPost.
Some gender disparities in cognition will not diminish even in more equal societies Improved living conditions and less gender-restricted educational opportunities reduce the cognitive disparities between men and women or improve the gap in favor of women, according to new research by the IIASA. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, investigated the extent to which improvements in living conditions and educational opportunities [...]The post Some gender disparities in cognition will not diminish even in more equal societies appeared first on PsyPost.
Megan Fox is a Loner? Megan Fox has it all.   The 28 year-old actress and model is currently starring in the latest Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles film. She’s probably best known for her roles in some of the internationally popular Transformer movies. She’s also regularly featured among breathless media lists of the most beautiful women in...
Learning the smell of fear: Mothers teach babies their own fears via odor, research finds Babies can learn what to fear in the first days of life just by smelling the odor of their distressed mothers, new research suggests. And not just “natural” fears: If a mother experienced something before pregnancy that made her fear something specific, her baby will quickly learn to fear it too — through the odor [...]The post Learning the smell of fear: Mothers teach babies their own fears via odor, research finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Facial features are the key to first impressions A new study by researchers in the Department of Psychology at the University of York shows that it is possible to accurately predict first impressions using measurements of physical features in everyday images of faces, such as those found on social media. When we look at a picture of a face we rapidly form judgements [...]The post Facial features are the key to first impressions appeared first on PsyPost.
Study suggests disruptive effects of anesthesia on brain cell connections are temporary A study of juvenile rat brain cells suggests that the effects of a commonly used anesthetic drug on the connections between brain cells are temporary. The study, published in this week’s issue of the journal PLOS ONE, was conducted by biologists at the University of California, San Diego and Weill Cornell Medical College in New [...]The post Study suggests disruptive effects of anesthesia on brain cell connections are temporary appeared first on PsyPost.
Memory relies on astrocytes, the brain’s lesser known cells When you’re expecting something—like the meal you’ve ordered at a restaurant—or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. These waves are called gamma oscillations and they reflect a symphony of cells—both excitatory and inhibitory—playing together in an orchestrated way. Though their role has been debated, gamma waves have been associated [...]The post Memory relies on astrocytes, the brain’s lesser known cells appeared first on PsyPost.
What is happening to the mental health of young people caught up in Gaza conflict? By Victoria Tischler, University of Nottingham I was approached to write this piece a few weeks back. Everyday matters took precedence: a family visit, work deadlines, an imminent house move. Yesterday, after saying I didn’t have time to write it, I woke up to see Jon Snow’s report from his recent visit to Gaza and [...]The post What is happening to the mental health of young people caught up in Gaza conflict? appeared first on PsyPost.
The Experiment That Makes People Face Up to Their Moral Hypocrisy Here's a delicious little experiment that give us a look at the seedy immorality of its research participants. No, it's not the Milgram Experiment or the Stanford Prison Experiment. It's as simple as a coin toss....
Brain's habenula signals how bad things could be An evolutionarily ancient and tiny part of the brain tracks expectations about nasty events, according to new research. The study demonstrates for the first time that the human habenula, half the size of a pea, tracks predictions about negative events, like painful electric shocks, suggesting a role in learning from bad experiences.
Glucose 'control switch' in the brain key to both types of diabetes Researchers have pinpointed a mechanism in part of the brain that is key to sensing glucose levels in the blood, linking it to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
Learning the smell of fear: Mothers teach babies their own fears via odor, animal study shows Babies can learn what to fear in the first days of life just by smelling the odor of their distressed mothers’, new research suggests. And not just “natural” fears: If a mother experienced something before pregnancy that made her fear something specific, her baby will quickly learn to fear it too -- through her odor when she feels fear.
The Best Way to Learn a Foreign Accent One common way to improve foreign-language skills is to watch videos in the foreign language. But if you’ve ever tried watching a foreign film, you know it can be quite difficult to follow along. Characters in movies talk in idioms, and faster than your high school French or German teacher...