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Neuro researchers advocate for shift in thinking for stroke rehabilitation A systematic shift in perspective has been proposed by neuroscientists, who suggest that chronically stimulating premotor areas of the brain would strongly promote stroke motor recovery, for example by restoring balance between the stroke and the intact hemispheres while establishing greater widespread connectivity.
Adults with ADHD: Tips for Juggling Life in Today’s We live in a wired, fast-paced world. We’re constantly plugged in — checking email and social media sites from all of our devices. We’re trying to meet ever-increasing expectations and demands, juggling careers and school, raising kids, managing our homes, entertaining, and much more, says Terry Matlen, MSW, ACSW, a...
Stigmatizing and Shunning the Severely Ill This is the worst of times for people with severe mental illness–many hundreds of thousands rare locked away in prison or languishing homeless on the streets. We are shunning them because of stigma and a misplaced preoccupation with the promise of future neuroscience research.
The Trouble With Heart Trouble For Women My friend Shannon’s mother had a heart attack this weekend. Luckily, her mom is okay and they discovered she had severe blockages that had been occurring for a long time. Shannon’s mother reported that in hindsight, she had been experiencing heart burn for years and had felt a marked decrease...
Teen insomnia linked with depression, anxiety A study of high school students has shed new light on the links between insomnia-related mental health conditions among teens. "People with insomnia find it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep for as long as they need to. This is a widespread sleep disorder among the general public, and in most countries about 11% of teens aged 13-16 years experience insomnia at some stage," one researcher said.
Brain response to appetizing food cues varies among obese people People who have the most common genetic mutation linked to obesity respond differently to pictures of appetizing foods than overweight or obese people who do not have the genetic mutation, according to a new study. More than one-third of adults are obese. Obesity typically results from a combination of eating too much, getting too little physical activity and genetics.
How We Learn: Reading and Math Ability Driven By The Same Genes First study to pinpoint the sole influence of genes on how we learn.Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Fear of Math: How Much is Genetic? Our Genes Respond Positively to The Right Kind of Happiness Meditation Changes How Genes Are Expressed Here’s The Psychological Key to Early Academic Achievement You Can Learn a New Language While You Sleep, Study Finds
What Really Happens at ‘The Great Love Debate’? Guest Bella's intro: There are some events I would never want to attend, such as ones that pose the question, "Why is everyone still single," as if that's a bad thing. Fortunately, the wonderful Kim Calvert went to one iteration of "The Great Love Debate" so we don't have to....
Chandelier of Pattern Interruption There is a chandelier in my sitting room. It’s hung too low. I bump into it with my noggin now and then. Everyone tells me I need to get an S-hook and raise it up a bit. They assure me that it is an easy fix. But I am not...
Is There a Cure for Bitterness? The classic poem “Desiderata” says that if you compare yourself to others you will either become vain or bitter. I don’t worry about becoming vain, as my self-esteem is still beneath sea level. But bitterness? That one had a hold of me last weekend. I reached out to a guy...
I’ve Done It Again, ADHD And Overload I’ve told you all before how I get caught up in my schedule. Not caught up as in everything done, caught up like a fish in a net. And I know I’ve mentioned that it seems to happen without me seeing it coming. It’s usually like a walk in the...
Study: Contrary to image, city politicians do adapt to voters Political scientists have long wondered whether city governments in the U.S. are really responsive to their voters. Aren’t local governments simply mired in machine politics, or under the sway of local big-money interests? Does ideology matter? Now a uniquely comprehensive study co-authored by an MIT political scientist has produced a pair of distinctive findings: first, [...]The post Study: Contrary to image, city politicians do adapt to voters appeared first on PsyPost.
A new brain-based marker of stress susceptibility Some people can handle stressful situations better than others, and it’s not all in their genes: Even identical twins show differences in how they respond. Researchers have identified a specific electrical pattern in the brains of genetically identical mice that predicts how well individual animals will fare in stressful situations. The findings, published July 29 [...]The post A new brain-based marker of stress susceptibility appeared first on PsyPost.
Preterm children’s brains can catch up years later There’s some good news for parents of preterm babies – latest research from the University of Adelaide shows that by the time they become teenagers, the brains of many preterm children can perform almost as well as those born at term. A study conducted by the University’s Robinson Research Institute has found that as long as the preterm child [...]The post Preterm children’s brains can catch up years later appeared first on PsyPost.
First grade reading suffers in segregated schools A groundbreaking study from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute has found that African-American students in first grade experience smaller gains in reading when they attend segregated schools—but the students’ backgrounds likely are not the cause of the differences. According to the Center for Civil Rights, although the United States is becoming more racially [...]The post First grade reading suffers in segregated schools appeared first on PsyPost.
A blood test for suicide risk? Alterations to a single gene could predict risk of suicide attempt Researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that, if confirmed in larger studies, could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person’s risk of attempting suicide.
HARO: My Secret Weapon to Landing Media Interviews Media interviews are a great way to share your passions and spread the word about your practice.  They can connect you with other professionals in the field, get your name out there to potentially attract more clients, and can often give you an additional source of income.  But how exactly...
Love is NOT Never Having To Say You’re Sorry The 1970 film Love Story was a beautiful film and considered one of the most romantic of all time. The most memorable line was “Love means never having to say you’re sorry.” At the time we were all moved by that line. Perhaps this is where the myth of unconditional...
Kids with Autism Live in an "Intense World" People who seem to be ‘tuned out’ of social interaction may, counter-intuitively, have become that way not because they have a deficit of empathy or mental/social apparatus, but because they have fled from too much sensory or emotional input.
Kids With Autism Live in an Intense World People who seem to be "tuned out" of social interaction may, counter-intuitively, have become that way not because they have a deficit of empathy or mental/social apparatus, but because they have fled from too much sensory or emotional input.