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Problem drinking in midlife doubles chance of memory problems in later life A study published today in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry indicates that middle-aged adults with a history of problem drinking are more than twice as likely to suffer from severe memory impairment in later life. The study highlights the hitherto largely unknown link between harmful patterns of alcohol consumption and problems with memory later in life [...]The post Problem drinking in midlife doubles chance of memory problems in later life appeared first on PsyPost.
Team studies the social origins of intelligence in the brain By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, scientists are tackling — and beginning to answer — longstanding questions about how the brain works. The researchers found that brain regions that contribute to optimal social functioning also are vital to general intelligence and to emotional [...]The post Team studies the social origins of intelligence in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Brainwaves can predict audience reaction for television programming Media and marketing experts have long sought a reliable method of forecasting responses from the general population to future products and messages. According to a study conducted at the City College of New York (CCNY) in partnership with Georgia Tech, it appears that the brain responses of just a few individuals are a remarkably strong [...]The post Brainwaves can predict audience reaction for television programming appeared first on PsyPost.
Autistic brain less flexible at taking on tasks, Stanford study shows The brains of children with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance, according to a new brain-imaging study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. Instead of changing to accommodate a job, connectivity in key brain networks of autistic children looks similar to connectivity in the resting brain. And the greater [...]The post Autistic brain less flexible at taking on tasks, Stanford study shows appeared first on PsyPost.
Short sellers not to blame for 2008 financial crisis, study finds Contrary to widespread media reports, the collapse of several financial firms during the 2008 economic crisis was not triggered by unsettled stock trades, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management. The study, forthcoming in the Journal of Financial Economics, analyzed the open interest of fails-to-deliver — stock trades in which [...]The post Short sellers not to blame for 2008 financial crisis, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Informal child care significantly impacts rural economies, study finds The child care industry has grown significantly in recent years, contributing considerably to the national economy through job creation and increased opportunities for parents to work. However, little knowledge exists of the size and economic impact of child care, especially informal child care, on rural economies. Now, University of Missouri researchers have studied the child [...]The post Informal child care significantly impacts rural economies, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
White lies make social networks stronger, but selfish lies tear them apart By Sylvia Tippmann, The Conversation “Lying is a bad thing – this is what mentors, parents and teachers tell us. But there is no society without lies.” So says theoretical physicist Rafael Barrio, and when he and his colleague Kimmo Kaski from the Aalto University School of Science in Finland thought about this blatant discrepancy, [...]The post White lies make social networks stronger, but selfish lies tear them apart appeared first on PsyPost.
Why being conscious is a barrier to understanding consciousness By Ken A. Paller, Northwestern University and Satoru Suzuki, Northwestern University We have no entirely satisfactory explanation for why a relentless stream of experiences normally fills your mind. On close examination, consciousness can seem truly miraculous and hopelessly ineffable. And, by this way of thinking, scientific research on consciousness would be pointless. The idea that [...]The post Why being conscious is a barrier to understanding consciousness appeared first on PsyPost.
Smart and smarter drugs: What they can do for us – and what they can’t Are we asking the right questions about smart drugs? Marek Kohn looks at what they can do for us – and what they can’t. “You know how they say that we can only access 20 per cent of our brain?” says the man who offers stressed-out, blank-screened ‘writer’ Eddie Morra a fateful pill in the [...]The post Smart and smarter drugs: What they can do for us – and what they can’t appeared first on PsyPost.
The Rebound: Understanding a Post Relationship Relationship When a relationship fails, and you find yourself back out there, sometimes it is hard to decipher if your next relationship is a rebound. It’s not like you can put a clock on when a rebound is a rebound, or when it’s not? You break up and you’re alone for...
iNertialized: The Hidden Problem with Cohabitation For decades, people have believed that living together should increase their odds of doing well in marriage because it provides a good test of the relationship beforehand. But there is almost no research support for this being true, which creates a mystery that I try to explain.
You Have Everything You Need Right Now To Be “Never underestimate the power of dreams and the influence of the human spirit. We are all the same in this notion: The potential for greatness lives within each of us.” - Wilma Rudolph There are so many excuses and rationalizations we come up with for not creating a more fulfilling and...
Now Arriving: A Cure for Lateness Why we are late and what we can do about it. Nearly everyone is late occasionally. But when the problem is persistent, and better-late-than-never isn’t getting us the outcomes we want, is there a solution? It turns out there is – if we are willing to play games.
Study identifies why some deal with stress better A specific electrical pattern in the brain of otherwise genetically identical mice can predict how well they will cope with stress.
Women are getting smarter faster than men When it comes to smarts, women are catching up to men in some areas and outpacing them in others, new research has found.
Women and Violence: Society's Double Standard Is there a double standard in society concerning the ways in which men and women should handle their anger; more specifically violent behavior? If so, why? Is it because of the traditional stereotypes that still exist in main-stream society about how women and men ought and should behave?
Addicted to Opiates: The Staggering Impact of Prescription Painkillers An in-depth look at the types of prescription painkillers, rise in opioid overdoses and who is at risk for abusing these legal drugs.   Prescription opiates, which have been formulated to alleviate pain, continue to rise on the scale of abuse and addiction. So much so, that the Obama administration...
My Love Hate Relationship with Women in Reality TV   I must admit, I watch the cocktail sipping, Range Rover driving and high end shopping of the Real Housewives franchise and the ridiculousness of Love and Hip Hop. But before you agree or disagree, let me explain why I watch these shows. I love the unscripted format of reality...
Watching neurons fire from a front-row seat They are with us every moment of every day, controlling every action we make, from the breath we breathe to the words we speak, and yet there is still a lot we don't know about the cells that make up our nervous systems. When things go awry and nerve cells don't communicate as they should, the consequences can be devastating. Speech can be slurred, muscles stop working on command and memories can be lost forever.
Brainwaves can predict audience reaction of television programming By analyzing the brainwaves of 16 individuals as they watched mainstream television content, researchers were able to accurately predict the preferences of large TV audiences, up to 90 percent in the case of Super Bowl commercials.