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Couples You Meet in Counseling: Mr. Perfect and His “What is her problem all the damn time? Why can’t she just chill out? We don’t have problems, she has problems. I have to get back to work.” The man who comes into counseling with this sort of mindset we will call Mr. Perfect. This high-achieving specimen of masculinity is...
How Someone With BPD Learns to Finally Let Go A woman recovering from a life spent suffering (unknowingly until recently) from Borderline Personality Disorder shares personal letters between herself and the ex-fiance who recently left, in part because of her BPD behaviors, to illustrate the strides she has made in learning to control her negative emotions and mindfully let go.
What Is A Soul-Mate? Can a soul mate be someone who opposes you?...
Mindfulness with CBT May Rewire the Brain Sensitized by Why do addicts seek their drug? Why can’t they stop? The 21st century view is that an addict’s brain becomes literally hardwired to crave the drug. It’s called “incentive-sensitization” – the theory has been around since 1993 and was made mainstream by an article in the journal Addictionin 2000. Basically,...
New brain-based marker of stress susceptibility: Finding might help prevent mental illnesses linked with stress Some people handle stressful situations better than others, and it's not all in their genes: Even identical twins show differences in how they respond to adversity. Researchers have identified an electrical pattern in the brains of genetically identical mice that predicts how well individual animals will fare in stressful situations. The results may eventually help researchers prevent a range of mental illnesses that have been linked with stress.
Life is so Unfair: What can I do about it Many people become angry at the unfairness in their lives. Unfairness is not about morality, altruism or equality. It is a temper tantrum that is used to gain an advantage or relieve the imbalance that is causing pain. The experience of unfairness can be heard is statements like, “I want...
Preterm children's brains can catch up years later There's some good news for parents of preterm babies -- latest research shows that by the time they become teenagers, the brains of many preterm children can perform almost as well as those born at term.
5 Ways to Raise Better Readers "Let them have apps!" and other interesting pieces of advice on raising readers in a digital age, courtesy of Jason Boog.
How The Right Type of Materialism Can Make You Happy All products were not created equal: some can even make you happy, new psychological research finds.Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Buy More Experiences and Less Stuff How Aging Changes What Makes You Happy Happy Habits: How to Fix Bad Moods How To Be Happy: 6 Most Uplifting TED Talks Here’s Why Materialistic People Are Less Happy and Less Satisfied
Recovery Need Not Be Your Only Identity Rollins once wrote: He tells me he’s doing better now It’s been a long upward crawl up from the sewer The bottom floor was hell for real He used to be addicted to junk Now he’s addicted to talking about How he’s not addicted to junk Counting the days he’s...
The Parenting Trick That Saves My Sanity This one is for all the parents of toddlers out there.  I started doing it three weeks ago and since then, no tantrums (from her, or from me!).  So I thought it was my civic duty to pass it on. My daughter is two and a half and she can...
6 Summer Activities to Boost Your Spirits Come summer, we may bask under blue skies, gorge on delicious barbecue and frequent the outdoors, acquiring boosts of vitamin D. However, seasonal affective disorder (SAD) can occur in the summer months, too. Here are summery activities that may reignite innocence and enjoyment: 1. Visit the water. This recent article discusses...
Best of Our Blogs: July 29, 2015 It is the unknown that scares us most. Pain, anguish, hurt can be grounding. They can prepare us for future challenges. Armed with their knowledge, difficulties can direct us toward action. They can remind us of a sad familiarity from our past. They can be an unconscious justification for victimhood...
Top 10 Mistakes in Making Behavioral Changes (and their Do you want to create irresistible habits that lead to a healthy, happy and long life? Sustaining long-term, positive habits is beyond frustrating for many people because they sabotage their success, sooner or later. According to Stanford researcher BJ Fogg, the key to success with positive habits lies in establishing...
Motivation may explain disconnect between cognitive testing and real-life functioning for older adults A psychology researcher at North Carolina State University is proposing a new theory to explain why older adults show declining cognitive ability with age, but don’t necessarily show declines in the workplace or daily life. One key appears to be how motivated older adults are to maintain focus on cognitive tasks. “My research team and [...]The post Motivation may explain disconnect between cognitive testing and real-life functioning for older adults appeared first on PsyPost.
Preschoolers with special needs benefit from peers’ strong language skills The guiding philosophy for educating children with disabilities has been to integrate them as much as possible into a normal classroom environment, with the hope that peers’ skills will help bring them up to speed.  A new study provides empirical evidence that peers really can have an impact on a child’s language abilities, for better or worse. [...]The post Preschoolers with special needs benefit from peers’ strong language skills appeared first on PsyPost.
New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer’s, related diseases There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, but the research community is one step closer to finding treatment. University of Washington bioengineers have designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body’s normal proteins into a state that’s linked to widespread diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, [...]The post New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer’s, related diseases appeared first on PsyPost.
Don’t tell me the good news yet: Early warning about goal completion a buzzkill Set goal, work to achieve goal, attain goal and react accordingly — that’s the script we write when we set our sights on an achievement. But what happens when the script isn’t followed, and you learn too soon that you will accomplish what you set out to do? New research from the University of Chicago [...]The post Don’t tell me the good news yet: Early warning about goal completion a buzzkill appeared first on PsyPost.
Glucose ‘control switch’ in the brain key to both types of diabetes Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have pinpointed a mechanism in part of the brain that is key to sensing glucose levels in the blood, linking it to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The findings are published in the July 28 issue of Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences. “We’ve discovered that the [...]The post Glucose ‘control switch’ in the brain key to both types of diabetes appeared first on PsyPost.
Stimulation of brain region restores consciousness to animals under general anesthesia Stimulating one of two dopamine-producing regions in the brain was able to arouse animals receiving general anesthesia with either isoflurane or propofol. In the August issue of Anesthesiology, investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) report that rats anesthetized with continuous doses of either agent would move, raise their heads and even stand up in response to [...]The post Stimulation of brain region restores consciousness to animals under general anesthesia appeared first on PsyPost.