Article Description
Pathological Lying: Can You Spot A Liar? Think back to an age at which you told the most lies or “fibs?” Were you 4, 5, 8, or 10? Why did you tell the lie? Were you trying to get something in return, manipulate a situation in your favor, or avoid hurting someone’s feelings? If so, you are...
Edward Snowden, the War on Terrorism, and the War on Drugs Much of the debate triggered by Edward Snowden’s leaks is about deciding on the proper level of electronic surveillance. While important, this discussion involves a static view of the problem. I would like to call attention to a dynamic aspect of the relationship among government surveillance, security crackdowns, and leaks.
Are You Making Excuses that Prevent You from Finding Are you the reason you’re still single? I’ve heard many excuses from women telling why they can’t find a man to love. I understand where they’re coming from; there was a time when I had plenty of excuses myself. But making excuses for why you can’t find a partner is...
Fear, not data, motivates sunscreen users, research shows We’re often told that worrying can be harmful to one’s health. But University at Buffalo researchers say that when it comes to preventing skin cancer, a little fear is good for you. In a study published in the Journal of Behavioral Medicine, the UB researchers found that fear and worry about skin cancer had a [...]The post Fear, not data, motivates sunscreen users, research shows appeared first on PsyPost.
Study examines neurological outcomes for TBI treatments In patients with a traumatic brain injury (TBI), neither the administration of the hormone erythropoietin (EPO) or maintaining a higher hemoglobin concentration through blood transfusion resulted in improved neurological outcome at 6 months, according to a study. Transfusing at higher hemoglobin concentrations was associated with a higher risk of adverse events.
Research links Alzheimer’s disease to brain hyperactivity Patients with Alzheimer’s disease run a high risk of seizures. While the amyloid-beta protein involved in the development and progression of Alzheimer’s seems the most likely cause for this neuronal hyperactivity, how and why this elevated activity takes place hasn’t yet been explained — until now. A new study by Tel Aviv University researchers, published in Cell Reports, [...]The post Research links Alzheimer’s disease to brain hyperactivity appeared first on PsyPost.
Are You a Victim of Change? One day a wise and respected king decided to humble his son, whom he saw as arrogant and unfit to take over the thrown. The king said to his son the prince, “My son, there is a certain ring that I want you to bring to me. I wish to...
The biology of addiction risk looks like addiction Research suggests that people at increased risk for developing addiction share many of the same neurobiological signatures of people who have already developed addiction. This similarity is to be expected, as individuals with family members who have struggled with addiction are over-represented in the population of addicted people. However, a generation of animal research supports [...]The post The biology of addiction risk looks like addiction appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain cells in the amygdala respond to subjective opinions instead of true emotion expressed When evaluating another person’s emotions – happy, sad, angry, afraid – humans take cues from facial expressions. Neurons in a part of the brain called the amygdala “fire” in response to the visual stimulation as information is processed by the retina, the amygdala and a network of interconnected brain structures. Some of these regions respond [...]The post Brain cells in the amygdala respond to subjective opinions instead of true emotion expressed appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds online bullying creates off-line fear at school Cyberbullying creates fear among students about being victimized at school, a recent study by Sam Houston State University found. While traditional bullying still creates the most fear among students, cyberbullying is a significant factor for fear of victimization at school among students who have experienced bullying or disorder At school, such as the presence of [...]The post Study finds online bullying creates off-line fear at school appeared first on PsyPost.
Studies: Addiction starts with an overcorrection in the brain The National Institutes of Health has turned to neuroscientists at the nation’s most “Stone Cold Sober” university for help finding ways to treat drug and alcohol addiction. Brigham Young University professor Scott Steffensen and his collaborators have published three new scientific papers that detail the brain mechanisms involved with addictive substances. And the NIH thinks [...]The post Studies: Addiction starts with an overcorrection in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Video games could provide venue for exploring sustainability concepts Could playing video games help people understand and address global sustainability issues such as pollution, drought or climate change? At least two researchers believe so, outlining their argument in a concept paper published in the journal “First Monday.” Video games have the potential to educate the public and encourage development of creative solutions to social, economic [...]The post Video games could provide venue for exploring sustainability concepts appeared first on PsyPost.
The power of the mind: Can meditation really slow ageing? Is there real science in the spiritualism of meditation? Jo Marchant meets a Nobel Prize-winner who thinks so. It’s seven in the morning on the beach in Santa Monica, California. The low sun glints off the waves and the clouds are still golden from the dawn. The view stretches out over thousands of miles of [...]The post The power of the mind: Can meditation really slow ageing? appeared first on PsyPost.
Explainer: What is emotional contagion and can you catch it on Facebook? By Bhismadev Chakrabarti, University of Reading Facebook has faced a storm of protest since it revealed that it had carried out a large-scale secret experiment to find out if it could make users feel more positive or negative by editing feeds to expose more “positive emotional” or “negative emotional” content. The researchers behind the study [...]The post Explainer: What is emotional contagion and can you catch it on Facebook? appeared first on PsyPost.
On the Nature of Words: Part 1 The meanings of words are less transparent than many assume.
Mental health wins when teens play school sports Adolescents who play team sports in grades 8 through 12 have less stress and better mental health as young adults, finds new research. "There is surprisingly little known about school sport, so we can only speculate as to the unique effects, but we suspect it might be due to school sport providing adolescents with opportunities to bond with other students, feel connected to their school, interact with their peers and coaches, thus, really providing a social and active environment," one investigator explained.
Addiction starts with an overcorrection in brain, study shows A trio of new studies show how the brain overcorrects to drugs and alcohol in a way that suppresses dopamine long-term, leading to withdrawal symptoms. "Addiction is a brain disease that could be treated like any other disease," one researcher said. "I wouldn't be as motivated to do this research, or as passionate about the work, if I didn't think a cure was possible."
Finally — Golden Gate Bridge Suicide Barrier Approved For decades, mental health advocates in the community have been calling for one of the most popular and iconic suicide sites in the world to erect a suicide barrier. We’ve been talking about it for nearly a decade here on this blog and noted 6 years ago that a suicide...
Get Angry to Get Happy "Stop crying this instant!" "Don't take that attitude with me!" You might not hear these commands anymore, but the things your parents and caregivers told you when you were angry as a child have stuck with you.
People on Autism Spectrum at Increased Risk for Substance Generally, people on the autism spectrum tend to be personally cautious and socially withdrawn. As you would expect, previous research shows that people with autism tend to have low rates of substance abuse – the preference for low risk and avoidance of social situations means less drinking or drug use....