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Chandelier of Pattern Interruption There is a chandelier in my sitting room. It’s hung too low. I bump into it with my noggin now and then. Everyone tells me I need to get an S-hook and raise it up a bit. They assure me that it is an easy fix. But I am not...
Is There a Cure for Bitterness? The classic poem “Desiderata” says that if you compare yourself to others you will either become vain or bitter. I don’t worry about becoming vain, as my self-esteem is still beneath sea level. But bitterness? That one had a hold of me last weekend. I reached out to a guy...
I’ve Done It Again, ADHD And Overload I’ve told you all before how I get caught up in my schedule. Not caught up as in everything done, caught up like a fish in a net. And I know I’ve mentioned that it seems to happen without me seeing it coming. It’s usually like a walk in the...
Study: Contrary to image, city politicians do adapt to voters Political scientists have long wondered whether city governments in the U.S. are really responsive to their voters. Aren’t local governments simply mired in machine politics, or under the sway of local big-money interests? Does ideology matter? Now a uniquely comprehensive study co-authored by an MIT political scientist has produced a pair of distinctive findings: first, [...]The post Study: Contrary to image, city politicians do adapt to voters appeared first on PsyPost.
A new brain-based marker of stress susceptibility Some people can handle stressful situations better than others, and it’s not all in their genes: Even identical twins show differences in how they respond. Researchers have identified a specific electrical pattern in the brains of genetically identical mice that predicts how well individual animals will fare in stressful situations. The findings, published July 29 [...]The post A new brain-based marker of stress susceptibility appeared first on PsyPost.
Preterm children’s brains can catch up years later There’s some good news for parents of preterm babies – latest research from the University of Adelaide shows that by the time they become teenagers, the brains of many preterm children can perform almost as well as those born at term. A study conducted by the University’s Robinson Research Institute has found that as long as the preterm child [...]The post Preterm children’s brains can catch up years later appeared first on PsyPost.
First grade reading suffers in segregated schools A groundbreaking study from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute has found that African-American students in first grade experience smaller gains in reading when they attend segregated schools—but the students’ backgrounds likely are not the cause of the differences. According to the Center for Civil Rights, although the United States is becoming more racially [...]The post First grade reading suffers in segregated schools appeared first on PsyPost.
A blood test for suicide risk? Alterations to a single gene could predict risk of suicide attempt Researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that, if confirmed in larger studies, could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person’s risk of attempting suicide.
HARO: My Secret Weapon to Landing Media Interviews Media interviews are a great way to share your passions and spread the word about your practice.  They can connect you with other professionals in the field, get your name out there to potentially attract more clients, and can often give you an additional source of income.  But how exactly...
Love is NOT Never Having To Say You’re Sorry The 1970 film Love Story was a beautiful film and considered one of the most romantic of all time. The most memorable line was “Love means never having to say you’re sorry.” At the time we were all moved by that line. Perhaps this is where the myth of unconditional...
Kids with Autism Live in an "Intense World" People who seem to be ‘tuned out’ of social interaction may, counter-intuitively, have become that way not because they have a deficit of empathy or mental/social apparatus, but because they have fled from too much sensory or emotional input.
Kids With Autism Live in an Intense World People who seem to be "tuned out" of social interaction may, counter-intuitively, have become that way not because they have a deficit of empathy or mental/social apparatus, but because they have fled from too much sensory or emotional input.
Autism and Sensory Processing Disorder Some children’s brains have difficulty interpreting a sensation, especially if it comes on the heels of another, different sensation.
35 Lessons on Body Image, Well-Being And Life Today is my 32nd birthday. Every year, for my b-day, I’ve been republishing a version of the below post. It’s become sort of a tradition around here. In it, I share what I’ve learned about body image, well-being and life in my years on this earth thus far. Why 35?...
Evaluating Your Mental Health Provider’s Credentials Last week I had a conversation with the parent of a child receiving both therapy and counseling services within the same agency. One of the first questions I was asked was “why is my daughter receiving counseling and therapy, aren’t they the same things?” I began to explain the differences...
Back to School: 5 Tips to Help the depressing 9B Pencil: Look at’em in their glass house… Oblivious to their new reality. Caption: The depressing Life of grade-schooler pencils   5 Tips to Help the Depressing Life of Grade-Schooler…PENCILS! 1. YOU have an eraser…comes in handy. 2. Use your eraser sparingly…make it last. 3. Avoid electric pencil sharpeners. 4....
Brand-specific TV alcohol ads a significant predictor of brand consumption among youth Underage drinkers are three times more likely to drink alcohol brands that advertise on television programs they watch compared to other alcohol brands, providing new and compelling evidence of a strong association between alcohol advertising and youth drinking behavior. This is the conclusion of a new study from the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth [...]The post Brand-specific TV alcohol ads a significant predictor of brand consumption among youth appeared first on PsyPost.
Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages during adolescence impairs memory, animal study suggests Daily consumption of beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup or sucrose can impair the ability to learn and remember information, particularly when consumption occurs during adolescence, a study done in rats suggests.
Blood sugar levels closely linked to how our brains respond to the sight of food, twin study finds Our brain's response to the sight of food appears to be driven more by how low our blood sugar level is at the moment than our upbringing or genetics.
Striatal dopamine transporter binding correlates with body composition and visual attention bias for food cues in healthy young men Scientists have described a way that brain chemistry may make some people notice food more easily, which can tempt overeating even in people who are not overweight.