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Study shows that mice can identify specific odors amid complex olfactory environments For many animals, making sense of the clutter of sensory stimuli is often a matter or literal life or death. Exactly how animals separate objects of interest, such as food sources or the scent of predators, from background information, however, remains largely unknown. Even the extent to which animals can make such distinctions, and how [...]The post Study shows that mice can identify specific odors amid complex olfactory environments appeared first on PsyPost.
Want to Increase Your Happiness? Try Increasing Your Gratitude “A simple grateful thought turned heavenwards is the most perfect prayer.” — Doris Lessing Think of anything — big or small — that exists in your life, whether it is a relationship, a job, a particular flower, or your morning coffee. Now, if this thing were to disappear tomorrow and...
Risk-glorifying video games increase high-risk behaviors in teens: study Previous studies show that violent video games increase adolescent aggressiveness, but new Dartmouth research finds for the first time that teen-agers who play mature-rated, risk-glorifying video games are more likely subsequently to engage in a wide range of deviant behaviors beyond aggression, including alcohol use, smoking cigarettes, delinquency and risky sex. More generally, such games [...]The post Risk-glorifying video games increase high-risk behaviors in teens: study appeared first on PsyPost.
Happiness of over 18,000 people worldwide predicted by an equation The happiness of over 18,000 people worldwide has been predicted by a mathematical equation developed by researchers at UCL, with results showing that moment-to-moment happiness reflects not just how well things are going, but whether things are going better than expected. The new equation accurately predicts exactly how happy people will say they are from [...]The post Happiness of over 18,000 people worldwide predicted by an equation appeared first on PsyPost.
Implanted neurons reprogrammed from skin cells become part of the brain: study Scientists at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have grafted neurons reprogrammed from skin cells into the brains of mice for the first time with long-term stability. Six months after implantation, the neurons had become fully functionally integrated into the brain. This successful, because lastingly stable, implantation of neurons [...]The post Implanted neurons reprogrammed from skin cells become part of the brain: study appeared first on PsyPost.
Children in immigrant families more likely to be sedentary Immigrant children from all racial and ethnic backgrounds are more likely to be sedentary than U.S.-born white children, according to a new study by sociologists at Rice University. The researchers said their findings should remind pediatricians and parents of children in immigrant families to encourage physical activity. The research revealed that children of immigrants from [...]The post Children in immigrant families more likely to be sedentary appeared first on PsyPost.
Evolutionary explanation for why some lessons more easily learned than others It’s easy to guess why it doesn’t take long to learn to avoid certain behaviors and embrace others. But how do we know what drives these predilections? A study led by Aimee Dunlap at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, and co-authored by University of Minnesota researcher David Stephens, offers insight into the evolutionary underpinning of [...]The post Evolutionary explanation for why some lessons more easily learned than others appeared first on PsyPost.
Positive emotions and a deadly disorder: Anorexia fueled by pride about weight loss Positive emotions – even those viewed through a distorted lens – may play an exacerbating role in fueling eating disorders like anorexia nervosa, which has a death rate 12 times higher for females between the ages of 15 and 24 than all other causes of death combined, according to a Rutgers study. In research published in Clinical [...]The post Positive emotions and a deadly disorder: Anorexia fueled by pride about weight loss appeared first on PsyPost.
Goalkeepers prone to ‘gambler’s fallacy’ but penalty takers fail to exploit it After a string of penalties aimed in the same direction, goalkeepers are more likely to dive in the opposite direction on the next penalty but kickers fail to exploit this pattern, finds new UCL research. The study, published in Current Biology, shows that penalty shoot-outs in international tournaments resemble a psychological game. The researchers studied penalty [...]The post Goalkeepers prone to ‘gambler’s fallacy’ but penalty takers fail to exploit it appeared first on PsyPost.
Birthday matters for wiring-up the brain’s vision centers Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have evidence suggesting that neurons in the developing brains of mice are guided by a simple but elegant birth order rule that allows them to find and form their proper connections. The study is published online July 31 in Cell Reports. “Nothing about brain wiring [...]The post Birthday matters for wiring-up the brain’s vision centers appeared first on PsyPost.
Women in military less likely to drink than civilian women While it is known that members of the U.S. military overall are more likely to use alcohol, a new study finds that female enlistees and female veterans are actually less likely to drink than their civilian counterparts. This study was published today in Armed Forces & Society, a SAGE journal published on behalf of the Inter-University [...]The post Women in military less likely to drink than civilian women appeared first on PsyPost.
Intelligent, Artistic, More Likely to Recover from BPD A large scale study shows that highly intelligent, artistic, disciplined, and attractive women stand the greatest chance of recovering from Borderline Personality Disorder.
Hallucinating in the deep waters of consciousness On Saturday I curated a series of short films about other inner worlds, altered states and the extremes of mental health at London’s Shuffle Festival. I discovered one of the films literally a couple of days before the event, and it completely blew me away. Narcose is a French documentary about a dive by world […]
Flores bones show features of Down syndrome, not a new 'Hobbit' human In October 2004, excavation of fragmentary skeletal remains from the island of Flores in Indonesia yielded what was called 'the most important find in human evolution for 100 years.' Its discoverers dubbed the find Homo floresiensis, a name suggesting a previously unknown species of human.
Mathematical equation to predict happiness: Doesn't depend on how well things go, but on whether things are better than expected The happiness of over 18,000 people worldwide has been predicted by a mathematical equation, with results showing that moment-to-moment happiness reflects not just how well things are going, but whether things are going better than expected.
Rape Jokes Are Not Funny There are times when I read something, and I shake my head in disbelief, wondering what prompted that kind of response. When I read about this tweet, I experienced something much greater than disbelief. It made me angry. If Ms. Alley was violated by the person she is referring to,...
Why Labeling Emotions Matters Labeling our emotions can help us regulate them better.
"Borderline" Provocations VIII: Lets You and Him Fight Being in a relationship, by blood or romance, with someone with traits of borderline personality disorder is incredibly challenging. While they may seem at times to be irrational, there is in fact a method to their madness. In part VIII of this series, I discuss situations in which other parties fight with one another over how a person with the disorder is being treated.
Anorexia Nervosa and Positive Emotion Is there more to anorexia than just a fear of gaining weight?
Eating baked, broiled fish weekly boosts brain health, study says Eating baked or broiled fish once a week is good for the brain, regardless of how much omega-3 fatty acid it contains, according to researchers. The findings add to growing evidence that lifestyle factors contribute to brain health later in life. Scientists estimate that more than 80 million people will have dementia by 2040, which could become a substantial burden to families and drive up health care costs.