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To Change or Not To Change As humans, we typically hate change. We are generally more comfortable in environments and relationships that are familiar than in those that require us to evolve. This is true even if what is familiar is unhealthy or unfulfilling. Consequently, when confronted with an undesirable aspect of our lives, it helps to examine the costs of changing and of not changing.
Mindfulness for Introverts I have been busy working on my latest book project, The Awakened Introvert: Practical Mindfulness Skills to Help you Maximize Your Strengths and Thrive in a Loud and Crazy World (forthcoming from New Harbinger in spring 2015).
Contradictory findings about effect of full moon on sleep According to folklore, the full moon affects human sleep. International researchers are trying to determine whether there is any truth to the belief. Studies have found that people actually sleep 20 minutes less when the moon is full, take five minutes longer to fall asleep and experience 30 minutes more of REM sleep, during which most dreaming is believed to occur.
Personal Power: How to Own It (& Stop Giving A successful relationship is one that deals with issues – differences, arguments — as communications that, to be effective, must recognize the personal power of both self and the other. When you interact with another, you face power in its purest form, that is, the power of the other person as an...
Blood Test for Alzheimer’s Breakthrough New test for disease which affects 115 million people around the world.Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:A Blood Test for Depression High Blood Sugar Levels Linked to Brain Decay The Peanut Butter Test for Alzheimer’s Disease The Effects of Vitamin E on Alzheimer’s and Age-Related Memory Problems 5 Habits Proven to Reduce Risk of Alzheimer’s and Dementia
What Does Your Teen Really Think About You? In my novel, “Don’t Try to Find Me” (out today!), Rachel’s 14-year-old daughter Marley runs away, and during the social media campaign to bring her home, many secrets are revealed.  Among them: What Marley thinks about her mom is radically different from what Rachel believes she’s communicating. While my novel...
Does Food Addiction Really Exist? When people use heroin, their brains become physiologically dependent on the drug and the behavioral patterns of use become written alongside this need. That’s addiction: both behaviorally and biologically, heroin addicts need the drug. When they don’t get it, they crave it, even though they may no longer like it...
Best of Our Blogs: July 8, 2014 I often hear people diagnosed with an illness say: “But I’m not going to change my ___ (diet, lifestyle, etc.).” I didn’t get it. I didn’t understand why you wouldn’t want to feel better or do what you can now so you can live a healthier tomorrow. But then I...
Make Your Relationship a Safe Haven How can we learn to love better? How do we make our intimate relationships feel like a safe haven—a totally safe place in which we can open up our hearts to each other? We can do this by learning to speak to each other in a different way. If we...
High earners in a stock market game have brain patterns that can predict market bubbles If you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich? It may be that, when it comes to stock market success, your brain is heeding the wrong neural signals. In a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week, scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and Caltech found that, when they simulated market conditions for [...]The post High earners in a stock market game have brain patterns that can predict market bubbles appeared first on PsyPost.
Individuals with both book smarts and social adeptness achieve greatest success at work Wanted: Highly skilled individual who is also a team player. In other words, someone who knows his or her stuff and also plays well with others. Two qualities are particularly essential for success in the workplace: book smarts and social adeptness. The folks who do well tend to demonstrate one or the other. However, according to [...]The post Individuals with both book smarts and social adeptness achieve greatest success at work appeared first on PsyPost.
Teens who work summer or evening jobs more likely to earn more in the future A new UBC Sauder School of Business study shows that teenagers who work at summer or evening jobs gain a competitive advantage later in life. Developing early knowledge of the working world and how to manage in it, they are more likely to find good employment and earn more money in the future. “With summer in full [...]The post Teens who work summer or evening jobs more likely to earn more in the future appeared first on PsyPost.
Mathematical model illustrates our online ‘copycat’ behavior Researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Limerick, and the Harvard School of Public Health have developed a mathematical model to examine online social networks, in particular the trade-off between copying our friends and relying on ‘best-seller’ lists. The researchers examined how users are influenced in the choice of apps that they install [...]The post Mathematical model illustrates our online ‘copycat’ behavior appeared first on PsyPost.
Taking a short smartphone break improves employee well-being, research finds Want to be more productive and happier during the workday? Try taking a short break to text a friend, play “Angry Birds” or check Facebook on your smartphone, according to Kansas State University research. In his latest research, Sooyeol Kim, doctoral student in psychological sciences, found that allowing employees to take smartphone microbreaks may be a benefit [...]The post Taking a short smartphone break improves employee well-being, research finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Teen dating violence cuts both ways: 1 in 6 girls and guys are aggressors, victims or both Dating during the teen years takes a violent turn for nearly 1 in 6 young people, a new study finds, with both genders reporting acts like punching, pulling hair, shoving, and throwing things. The startling number, drawn from a University of Michigan Medical School survey of more than 4,000 adolescent patients ages 14 to 20 [...]The post Teen dating violence cuts both ways: 1 in 6 girls and guys are aggressors, victims or both appeared first on PsyPost.
The Effect of a Bellowing Child The distinction between nature and nurture is complicated and lost when considering older persons. But this case demonstrates how difficult it is to separate the causes of personality even when a chld is very young.
Young Adults and Suicide Suicide is a mental health problem affecting the lives of young adults. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cites suicide to be the third leading cause of death for people between the ages of 10 and 24. In order to prevent suicide of young adults, families need to talk...
Sleep deprivation leads to symptoms of schizophrenia Twenty-four hours of sleep deprivation can lead to conditions in healthy persons similar to the symptoms of schizophrenia. This discovery was made by an international team of researchers under the guidance of the University of Bonn and King’s College London. The scientists point out that this effect should be investigated more closely in persons who [...]The post Sleep deprivation leads to symptoms of schizophrenia appeared first on PsyPost.
Mind the gap: Socioeconomic status may influence understanding of science When it comes to science, socioeconomic status may widen confidence gaps among the least and most educated groups in society, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Science, Media and the Public research group. The findings, published in June in the journal Science Communication, show that similar levels of attention to [...]The post Mind the gap: Socioeconomic status may influence understanding of science appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuroscientists find dodging dots experiment helps explain brain circuitry A neuroscience study provides new insight into the primal brain circuits involved in collision avoidance, and perhaps a more general model of how neurons can participate in networks to process information and act on it. In the study, Brown University neuroscientists tracked the cell-by-cell progress of neural signals from the eyes through the brains of [...]The post Neuroscientists find dodging dots experiment helps explain brain circuitry appeared first on PsyPost.